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Ancestor list for the children of Leo James Lubiniecki and Alma Cecilia Reagan

We briefly summarize here everything we know of the ancestry of the five children of Leo James Lubiniecki, of Sturgis, Saskatchewan, and his wife Alma Cecilia Reagan. We note that he was half Polish and half Ukrainian, while she would appear to have been entirely of Irish ancestry, although some details remain uncorroborated at this time.
     For fuller, documented accounts of some of the families figuring in these notes see Lubiniecki, Demchuk, Warowy, Sołonynka, Reagan, Heaney, Healy, and McCann, where more detailed acknowledgements will be found. Treatment of several of these lines is given in Harvest of Memories: Sturgis and District …, 1900-2000, by the Sturgis and District History Book Committee (Sturgis, Saskatchewan: the Committee, 2000), from which we draw heavily for accounts of Lubiniecki (518-21), Reagan (622-25, 662-66), and Healy (407-8). For the Demchuk family, we are much indebted to Vladimir J. Kaye, Dictionary of Ukrainian Canadian Biography [vol. 1] — Pioneer Settlers of Manitoba, 1891-1900 (Toronto, 1975), 18-19, despite some inconsistencies and misprints in the dates, and to the typescript Demchuk genealogy prepared by Demetrius Paul Demchuk (ca. 1895-1978), of Grandview, Manitoba (from a copy kindly supplied by Larry Hrehirchuk, of Winnipeg). A breakthrough on this family came when the brothers Chris and Mike Bostwick, descended from the Bazczak and Panagabko families, provided copies of the baptismal records of Kataryna Demchuk (no. 5 below) and her younger sister Mariya. For all the families ancestral to Kataryna Demchuk we are profoundly indebted to Gary Duschl for additional research in church registers. For all the families ancestral to Helen Healy (no. 7) we owe much to the notes of Florence (Healy) Keller, copies of which were kindly supplied by her daughter, Marsha Keller Weaver, of Kansas.
     We should also like to thank Del Lubiniecki, Kevin Lubiniecki, Mrs. Janice Reagan, and especially Yvonne (Desroches) Hawkins, Lorraine (Gregrash) Barlow, and Tom Schaffner, for providing some of the material appearing here. The photograph of Antonina (Warowy) Demchuk is from the collection of the late Eugene Blahitka, via his son and daughter-in-law Bill and Mary (Allen) Blahitka. Special gratitude is due to Jan (O’Brien) Ehresmann for invaluable help with the Reagan and Heaney families.
     The table ends at the eighth generation, as none of the lines can presently be extended further.


Generation II

  1. Leo James Lubiniecki, born 4 July 1907 at Dauphin, Manitoba, died 20 April 1976 in the Preeceville Hospital, Preeceville, Saskatchewan. He appears with his mother as a child in the 1911 census, his father being absent from the household at the time. As an adult Leo Lubiniecki lived at Front Street, Sturgis. Leo James Lubiniecki He began teaching at Sturgis High School in 1945, then from 1948 to 1972 was its Principal, making him the longest-serving Principal in the school’s history (as of the year 2000); he appears in a staff group photograph of 1971-72 which is reproduced in Harvest of Memories, p. 76. He supervised the construction of the huge letters in cement which spell out the name “Sturgis” on a hill on the north side of the town, a drawing of which appears on the title-page of Harvest of Memories. He was also an accomplished amateur photographer, and some of his work may be seen in the Sturgis Station House Museum. Leo Lubiniecki and his wife are buried in St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Cemetery, in the north part of the town. He married 17 October 1936 in St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church, Sturgis,
  2. Alma Cecilia Reagan, born 14 July 1915 at Sturgis, died 21 September 1980 at Yorkton Union Hospital, and buried beside her husband. Alma Cecilia Reagan According to Harvest of Memories, pp. 518-19, “She was educated at Mannanah and Sturgis schools until Grade 8. She then worked at home and [at] farms in the area.” She may be seen in her mid-twenties in a group photograph with her parents and siblings, evidently taken ca. 1940, which is reproduced in Harvest of Memories, p. 665. She and her mother were charter members of the Sturgis Council of the Catholic Women’s League in 1949, and apear in a group photograph thereof taken at the time which is reproduced in Harvest of Memories, p. 205; Alma served as its President from 1959 to 1961 and from 1971 to 1973.

Generation III

  1. Julian Lubiniecki, born 7 July 1880 (?) at Jazłowiec, in the province of Podolia, Galicia (then in Austria, now in Ukraine), died 16 September 1962 at Regina, Saskatchewan, aged over 82 years. He was brought by his parents to Canada, sailing from Hamburg on the Pisa and arriving at Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 23 May 1898. In the ship’s passenger list, in which his name is recorded as “Julian Lubinikie,” the age of 16 years reported for him does not agree with family records, and may be slightly understated. As “Julian Lubinickie” he is enumerated in the census of the town of Morton, near Brandon, as a domestic servant in the household of a George Armstrong; this source states his birthdate as 7 July 1881 but his “age at last birthday” as 20, which is contradictory, and gives his year of immigration (wrongly) as 1895 and his annual income as $300. He was naturalized in 1905. After his marriage Julian and his wife came to the Keld District, near Dauphin, Manitoba, where they were enumerated in the 1906 census at section 24, in township 23, range 21 west of the Principal Meridian, with livestock consisting of 2 milk-cows, 6 other head of cattle, and no horses, sheep, or hogs, and his year of immigration to Canada given (again wrongly) as 1897. On 19 March 1909 Julian Lubiniecki was patented the 160 acres forming the northwest quarter of this same piece of land. His family is listed at section 24, but inexplicably without him, in the 1911 census. But by August 1920 he and his wife were living on 9th Avenue S.W., Dauphin. According to his grandchildren, “Julian farmed for a while and worked as a carpenter, at times for as little as one dollar a day. He spoke five languages and often acted as an interpreter and teacher for other immigrants in the area. After Julian’s marriage to Katherine Demchuk, they moved to Sturgis around 1930, where Julian built and set up the first Red and White Store in town (where the former Sturgis Bookstore is located). Apparently he loved carpentry more than running the store.” In February of 1937 he placed a newspaper advertisement which ran in places as far away as Winnipeg, announcing the sale of a “Red and White Store building, fixtures, and stock [worth] around $6000” (Winnipeg Free Press, 13 February 1937, p. 36). The account in Harvest of Memories continues, “After Kateryna died in 1945, Julian moved to Regina. He continued working as a carpenter.” After Katherine died in 1945, Julian moved to Regina. He continued working as a carpenter.” His grandniece, Lorraine (Gregrash) Barlow, daughter of Lillian (Lubiniecki) Gregrash, informs us: “My mother was fond of her Uncle Julian. They both had red hair, shared a love of books, and she considered him her mentor — he encouraged her to pursue a career in teaching.” He married 15 May 1904 at Winnipeg, a few weeks before her fifteenth birthday,
  2. Kataryna Demchuk, born 3 June 1889 at Tsyhany, in the district of Borshchiv, oblast of Ternopil’, Ukraine, baptized the same day in the Greek Catholic church, died 24 May 1945 at Sturgis, aged over 55 years. The Lubiniecki family has preserved a correct tradition of her birthdate being 1889, which agrees with the statement in her marriage certificate that she was [nearly] 15 years of age at the time.
  3. Christopher Lawrence Reagan, of Sturgis, born 5 August 1880 at Eden Valley, Meeker Co., Minnesota, U.S.A., baptized at Manannah, Minnesota (according to his marriage record), died 1 November 1961 in Preeceville Hospital, aged over 81 years, and buried with his wife in St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Cemetery, Sturgis. Christopher Lawrence Reagan Christopher Reagan may be seen in his late teen years in a group photograph with his parents and siblings, probably taken ca. 1896-98, which is reproduced in Harvest of Memories, p. 665. He accompanied his parents to Saskatchewan in 1903. He was living near Sturgis, Saskatchewan, by 18 December 1907, when he was patented the 160 acres of the northeast quarter of section 24, township 34, range 4 of the second meridian west of the Principal Meridian, this land being about 6 miles west of the town. Christopher Reagan, along with his brother Thomas P. Reagan and two other members of the Reagan family, was one of the ten founders of the Sturgis Credit Union in 1939. A photograph of him and his wife, taken in 1950, is also reproduced in Harvest of Memories, p. 665. He married 1 January 1909 in St. Gerard’s Catholic Church, Yorkton, Saskatchewan,
  4. Elizabeth Helen Healy, born 4 March 1891 at or near Ardoch, Walsh County, North Dakota, Helen Healy bapt. at Minto, North Dakota (according to her marriage record), died 16 November 1951 at or near Sturgis, aged 60 years, and buried in the Roman Catholic cemetery on the hill overlooking Sturgis. She was brought by her parents to Saskatchewan in 1904. Helen (Healy) Reagan and her daughters “Van” (Reagan) Reed and Alma (Reagan) Lubiniecki (our no. 3) were charter members of the Sturgis Council of the Catholic Women’s League in 1949, and appear in the group photograph thereof which has already been mentioned.

Generation IV

  1. Anton(ius) Lubieniecki, of Jazłowiec, later of Dauphin, Manitoba, born ca. 1842 at Jazłowiec in the province of Podolia, Galicia (then in Austria, now in Ukraine), and still living there in 1880, when his son Julian was born, but died (testate) 13 August 1917 at Dauphin, Manitoba, aged 75 years. Antonius Lubieniecki was described as a town-dweller (oppidanus in the Latin record) of Jazłowiec when he served as a baptismal sponsor to two of the children of Ignac Witwicki and Magdalena Wecław, whose daughter Maria would later become the wife of Antonius’s son Marian. He is called Antoni in his death record, but Antonius in the 1904 marriage record of his son Julian. He is attested at Jazłowiec in 1888 and 1890, when he served as a baptismal sponsor in the Roman Catholic church. According to his great-granddaughter Lorraine (Gregrash) Barlow, “Anton was born in Jazłowiec, which was under Austria-Hungary at the time. He did the required military service (age 18-28) and then married Mary Nyczek [i.e. Nasadiuk] who was the only child from a well-to-do family…. They lived in town where Anton had a business — something to do with wheels for carts, carriages and the like. Due to economic misfortunes and the promise of a good life in Canada, they decided to make the move…. They sailed to Halifax harbour and were in quarantine for three months before making their way out to the Dauphin area.” Indeed, he and his wife brought their family of four children to Canada, sailing from Hamburg on the Pisa and arriving at Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 23 May 1898; in the ship’s passenger list he is recorded as “Antonie Lubinikie,” aged 54, born in Austria, farmer. We have not found him in the 1901, 1906, or 1910 census. His death certificate states that he was of no occupation, had been living at Dauphin for 9 years and in the province (of Manitoba) for 20 years, and that his father was also born at Jazłowiec; the informant was his son, “J[ulian] Lubiniecki” (our no. 4). He married (as her first husband) before 1878,
  2. Maria Nasadiuk, born 1853-54 (aged 44 in 1898, 65 in 1919) at Jazłowiec (according to the record of her second marriage), died 21 April 1926 (per her tombstone), and buried (as Maria Rolski) with her first husband. She married secondly, 30 May 1919 in the Church of the Resurrection, Dauphin, by Greek Catholic rites, Tymko Rolski/Rolsky, born 1848-49 (aged 70 in 1919) in the Borshchiv district, Galicia, died 14 July 1928 in a railway accident at Dauphin, aged 81 years, son of Demko Rolsky and Justina Slywka.
  3. Wasyl (”William”) Demchuk, born 1 August 1860 (according to the 1901 census), at Tsyhany aforesaid, in the province of Galicia, Austria (now in the Ukraine), Wasyl Demchuk died 7 March 1934 at the General Hospital, Dauphin, Manitoba, aged “77 yrs.,” and buried in St. Josaphat’s Ukrainian Catholic Cemetery, Sifton. He is said in Harvest of Memories to have been a land overseer before his immigration. The very interesting typescript history of the Demchuk family by his nephew Demetrius P. Demchuk mentions that before leaving the Ukraine, Wasyl Demchuk visited the old cemetery at Tsyhany and copied the names of their ancestors into a “prayer book” (we do not know if it has survived). He brought his family to Canada on the Christiania, arriving at Halifax on 12 July 1898. On 26 August following, as “Wasyl Demtchuk, farmer” he applied (successfully) for a patent to SE-30-27-20-W.1.M., at Valley River, just west of Sifton, Manitoba, where he is also listed in a directory published in 1923. He was naturalized on 31 March 1902. He should not be confused with an apparently unrelated and somewhat older Wasyl Demchuk, born 1834, who died 21 April 1926 in the municipality of Rockwood, near Selkirk, Manitoba. Demetrius P. Demchuk mentions him regularly visiting his daughter Kataryna (Demchuk) Lubiniecki in Dauphin to take her farm produce in the 1920s. He married 1 June 1884 in the Greek Catholic Church, Tsyhany (not in 1882 as stated in his wife’s death notice),
  4. Antonina Warowy, born at Tsyhany about 1866 (her birthdate is given as 4 July 1865 in 1901 census but as October 1866 in the 1911 census, Antonina Warowy and her age is given as 39, implying a birthdate of 1866-67, in the 1906 census), died 5 October 1963 at Dauphin, “in her 95th year” (i.e. aged 94 years), and buried in the new section of St. Josaphat’s Cemetery, Sifton. She and her husband settled near her probable kinsman Peter Waroway, who had come with his wife Warwara from Tsyhany to the Dauphin area in 1897. Her mother followed in 1904. Antonina Warowy had ten children, and at the time of her death, 40 grandchildren, 81 great-grandchildren, and 12 great-great-grandchildren.
  5. Patrick John Reagan, of Sturgis, Saskatchewan, said to have been born 17 March 1841 (which date is borne out as to the month and year by the 1852 census), in Ireland, the place being given variously as Dublin or co. Cork, died (testate) 18 December 1913 at or near Sturgis, apparently aged 71 years, and buried in St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Cemetery. Patrick John Reagan He was brought by his parents to Canada some time after 1845, and with them as an 11-year-old child in the 1852 census of Grey Co., Ontario. A directory published in 1865 lists “Patrick Ragan” at lot 41, concession 2 of Normanby Tp., only two lots away from his father. However, the family tradition that he and his wife were living at Mount Forest, Arthur Tp., Wellington Co., Ontario, when their eldest child was born in 1866, is in conflict with that child’s place of birth as given in U.S. census records. In any case, they moved shortly after their marriage to Manannah Tp., Meeker Co., Minnesota, where they were enumerated in the censuses of 1870 and 1875, 1880, and 1900 (the 1890 census is lost for most of Minnesota). The 1900 census correctly states that they had then been married 35 years. On 10 June 1872 Patrick Reagan was patented the southwest quarter of section 8, in township 121N, 31W of the 5th Principal Meridian, in Meeker County, consisting of 160 acres of land. In 1903, Patrick and his family came to Saskatchewan, where Patrick Reagan purchased the northwest quarter of section 13, in township 34, range 4 of the second meridian west of the Principal Meridian, and the northeast quarter of section 26 in the same township. On a map of the Sturgis area issued ca. 1907 (?) by the Scandinavian Canadian Land Co., his name is given as Patrick Reagan (not O’Reagan). According to the account in Harvest of Memories, they lived in sod houses for the first few years in Saskatchewan, but later “built a 25×18 foot lumber house as well as some out-buildings.” A photograph of his family is reproduced in Harvest of Memories, p. 622. He married 10 February 1865 in Grey Co. (per Grey County marriage register),
  6. Catherine Heaney, said to have been born 10 May 1841 in Ireland (which is compatible with her age as given in the 1852 and 1870 censuses), Catherine Heaney died 1 January 1916, at or near Sturgis, Saskatchewan, apparently aged 74 years, and buried with her husband. She was brought to Normanby Tp., Grey Co., Upper Canada by her parents about 1842. Her parents are named in her marriage record as Owen “Henry” (sic) and Mary Smith, and she is found as a 11-year-old child in the household of Owen and Mary Heaney in the 1852 census. Corroboration of this identification comes from the memory of descendants that she was aunt to Timothy Gibney, of Sturgis; Gibney family records showed the latter as a son of John Gibney and Anne Heaney, which couple were found in the 1861 census of Normanby Tp.
  7. John Joseph Healy, born 16 August 1858 at Portland, a village mainly in Bastard Tp. but partly in South Burgess Tp., Leeds Co., Ontario, baptized 24 September 1858 in (Old) St. Philip Neri Roman Catholic Church, in the town of Kitley (now Toledo), Kitley Tp., Leeds Co., died 20 August 1938, at the home of his daughter, Helen (Healy) Reagan, near Sturgis, Saskatchewan, aged over 80 years, John Joseph Healy and buried with his wife in St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic cemetery, just north of Sturgis, where their tombstone survives (2015). He is found as a child in the household of his parents in 1871. From a later reference to him in the 1900 census of North Dakota, which supplies birthdates precise to the month, we are told that John J. Healy and his wife came to the United States in 1880 and 1883 respectively. If this is true, their marriage must have occurred during a return trip by John Healy to Canada. In any case, Elizabeth’s death notice states that “in the same year” as their marriage, “she and her husband emigrated to the United States, where they settled near Adroch, North Dakota.” The 1900 census suggests that this couple was in Minnesota in June 1884, April 1886, and October 1887, when their first three children were born, and were in North Dakota between May 1889 and Jan. 1897, when their five younger children were born. However, it was at the city of Grand Forks, in the Dakota Territories, that this couple was enumerated in the 1885 census; John is called a farmer, and the record agrees with the 1900 census in giving the birthplace of his eldest child as Minnesota. The 1890 census of North Dakota is lost, but further detail on John is supplied by his immigration application, dated 29 April 1880 in Grand Forks County, Territory of Dakota, which states, in part: “John Haley [sic] personally appeared … and made oath that he was born in Canada on or about the year 1858, that he emigrated to the United States, and landed at the port of Huron on or about the month of November in the year 1879, that it is bona fide his intention to become a Citizen of the United States….” On 1 November 1890, having more than satisfied the five-year residency requirement, “John J. Healey” was granted the requested citizenship. On 1 September 1891 John J. Healy was patented the northeast quarter of section 30, in township 154N, 52W of the 5th Principal Meridian, in Grand Forks County, North Dakota, consisting of 160 acres of land. Again as John J. Healy, he is enumerated with his family in the 1900 census of Levant Township, Grand Forks County, North Dakota, which calls him a farmer, indicates that everyone in his family was literate and that no children had died in infancy, and states that both of his and both of his wife’s parents were born in Ireland. According to the local history, he and his wife “immigrated … to the Eden Valley area of the District of Assiniboia [now Saskatchewan] in the fall of 1904 and started homesteading in the Spring of 1905.” The 1906 census agrees that Healy and his wife came to Canada in 1904; thus the date of 1906 reported both in their 50th wedding anniversary announcement and in Elizabeth’s death notice is clearly too late. As “John Joseph Healy” he received a crown grant of the southwest quarter of section 34, in township 34, range 4 of the second meridian west of the Principal Meridian, and the map of the Sturgis area issued ca. 1907 (?) by the Scandinavian Canadian Land Co. shows him there and on the northwest-quarter of section 27 in the same township, which was kitty-corner to it. He married 22 April 1883 in (Old) St. Phillip’s Church, in the town of Kitley (now Toledo), Kitley Tp., Leeds Co., Ontario, possibly during a return trip to Canada,
  8. Elizabeth Ellen McCann, born 8 October 1859 near Portland, Bastard Tp., Leeds County, Ontario, baptized 21 December 1859 in the (Old) St. Philip Neri Roman Catholic Church, in the town of Kitley (now Toledo), Kitley Tp., Leeds Co., died 3 April 1936, at her home in Sturgis, aged over 76 years, and buried 7 April following with her husband. Elizabeth E. McCann Her middle name is given as Ellen in the record of her baptim, but seems to be given as “Elenor” in the 1861 census, which is not very legible; elsewhere she is usually recorded only as “Elizabeth E.” As noted above, she went to the U.S. in 1883, probably close to the time of her marriage, then subsequently went with her husband and family to Canada. According to Harvest of Memories, when the school at Mannanah, Saskatchewan, opened and the original teacher hired was unable to continue, Elizabeth Healy took over in the fall of 1907 and continued teaching until, a year and a half later, the school was closed because of a severe outbreak of measles. She was also active at Eden Valley and Sturgis in organizing theatrical and dance productions, writing and producing a play entitled The Real Irish. Her poem about Sturgis, entitled “The City on the Hill,” placed first in a contest sponsored by the Saskatchewan Homemakers Clubs in July 1933.

Generation V

  1. (Lubieniecki)
  2. Iwan Nasadiuk, of Jazłowiec, farmer, whose name is known from the record of the second marriage of his daughter Maria.
  3. Catharina Kruszelnicka, whose name is known from the record of the second marriage of her daughter Maria, and who as “Catharina Nasatiuk [sic] wife of Joannes” (Catharina Nasatiuk Joannis uxor) served as a baptismal sponsor in the Roman Catholic church of Jazłowiec on 14 April 1878.
  4. Fedor Demchuk, a landowner at Tsyhany aforesaid, in the province of Galicia, Austria (now in the Ukraine), born about 1826-27 (aged 39 in 1866), died 19 March 1866, aged 39 years, and buried two days later at Tsyhany, “in the new cemetery on the west side of the village.” The baptismal record of his own daughter Petronella, baptized 12 July 1859 at Tsyhany, names his and his second wife in the latinized forms Theodorus Demczuk (son of Alexius Demchuk and Maria ____) and Maria Panagabka (daughter of Petrus Panagabko and Anna ____). The fact that this wife Mariya was the mother of his son Wasyl (no. 10) is proved by the baptismal records of Wasyl’s daughters Kataryna Demchuk (no. 5) and Mariya Demchuk, in which the names of the paternal grandparents are given, again in latinized form, as Theodorus Demczuk and Maria ____. He married (as her first husband) by 1852,
  5. Mariya Panagabka, born 1830-31 (aged 38 in 1869), still alive in 1869 (the date of her second marriage), whose name is given in the baptismal records of her granddaughters Kataryna Demchuk (no. 5) and Mariya Demchuk. She married (2) in 1869, Joannes Sytnik. The mother of no. 10 is incorrectly named as Anna Bilinski in the manuscript Demchuk history by Demetrius P. Demchuk.
  6. Martin Warowy, born 1838-39 (aged 24 at his marriage in 1863), alive in 1865, but died by 1904 when his wife is called a widow. His name is known only from the baptismal records of his granddaughters Kataryna Demchuk (no. 5) and Mariya Demchuk. As “Martinus Basilii et Irenæ Worowy filius” he married 2 May 1863 in house no. 146, Tsyhany, according to Roman Catholic rites,
  7. Mariya Sołonynka, born 1842-43 (aged 20 at her marriage in 1863) in “Poland” (i.e. probably in Galicia), died 12 March 1914 at Lake St. Martin in the Rural Municipality of Coldwell, Manitoba (death record, which gives a wildly exaggerated age at death and an impossible birthdate of 20 August 1825). Her first name is known from the baptismal records of her granddaughters Kataryna Demchuk (no. 5) and Mariya Demchuk. She is called “Maria, Procopii et Agnetis Sołonynka filia” in her marriage record, and the statement in her death record that her parents were J. Solonynka and Agathe Syracusa is possbibly a confusion with her paternal grandparents, Jacob Sołonynka and Marianna Szewcuwa. The widow Maria Warowy, with her sons Peter and Fedor, departed from Hamburg on the S.S. Blücher on 13 April 1904, arriving on 24 April at New York. The entry gives the family’s nationality as Austrian and “race” as Polish, last residence as Cygany, and final destination as Winnipeg, Manitoba, with a note that they were going to join “brother of [sic] law Wasyl Demczuk [of] Winnipeg.” The notation describing Wasyl Demczuk as a brother-in-law falls not beside Mariya’s name but rather beside that of one of her sons; and while it is not clear that this was intentional, it would appear to be correct, agreeing with the statement in his death notice that the son Peter and “Mrs. A[ntonia] Demchuk” were siblings. The passenger list gives Mariya’s age as 58, implying a birthdate of 1845-46 and in reasonably good agreement with her marriage record. But records of her in later life contain preposterous statements respecting her age. “Mary” Warowy is found in the household of her son Peter at Winnipeg in the 1911 census (see below), with a stated age of 85 years and year of birth of 1826, and less than three years later a newspaper report of her death gives her age as 89. Her son Peter, explicitly identified as such, was the informant for her death.
  8. Thomas Regan (Sr.), of Normanby Tp., Grey Co., Ontario, and Manannah Tp., Meeker Co., Minnesota, born ca. 1809 (aged “45 at next birthday” in 1852, aged 65 in 1875) in Ireland, of Irish-born but unidentified parents; alive in 1875 but probably not in 1880. It seems likely that Thomas and his wife were from Cork, which is said to have been the birthplace of their daughter Alice, and whence (an admittedly somewhat vague) family tradition also derives their son Patrick. They came to Canada some time after Alice’s birth, which was almost certainly in 1845, and were enumerated in the 1852 census of Normanby Tp., which gives Thomas’s occupation as farmer and the family’s religion as Roman Catholic. A directory published in 1865 lists “Thomas Ragan” at lot 39, concession 2 of Normanby. Thomas Reagan went by 1870 to Manannah Tp., where he is listed alone, as a farmer, in the census of that year. He married (2) between 1870 and 1875, Mary ____, born ca. 1824-25 (aged 50 in 1875) in Ireland, of Irish-born parents; alive in 1875. They are listed in the 1875 census of Manannah Tp., but have not been found in that of 1880. He married (1) by 1831, presumably in Ireland,
  9. Margaret McEnter (spelling of surname uncertain), born ca. 1810-11 (aged “42 at next birthday” in 1852), died by 1870.
  10. Owen Heaney (Sr.), of Normanby Tp., Grey Co., Ontario, born probably in 1799 (he was said to be aged “54 at next birthday” in January 1852) in Ireland, died January 1870, aged at least 69 years (there does not appear to have been any official registration), and buried in Chapel Hill Roman Catholic Cemetery, Orchardville, on the Normanby-Egremont townline. It would appear from the birthplaces of their children that he and his wife came from Ireland to Canada West (now Ontario) some time between 1841 and 1843, likely in 1842. They were enumerated in the 1852 census of Normanby Tp., which gives Owen’s occupation as farmer and the family’s religion as Roman Catholic, their children including a daughter Catherine (our no. 13), aged 12 “at next birthday.” We have not found this family in the 1861 census of Normanby Tp., but there are lengthy illegible stretches in the record. A directory published in 1865 lists “Owen Heany” at lot 17, concession 1 of Normanby. He married before 1833, presumably in Ireland,
  11. Mary Smith, born ca. 1811-12 (aged “41 at next birthday” in 1852) in Ireland, died 11 April 1887 in Normanby Tp., the age of 78 years given in her death record being probably exaggerated. In 1871 and 1881 she appears as a widow in the household of her son, Owen Heaney, Jr. Her full name is provided in the 1865 marriage record of her daughter Catharine, in the 1866 marriage record of her son Christopher, and in the 1915 death record of her son Patrick.
  12. Michael Healy, of Bastard Township, Leeds County, Ontario, born about 1819-21 (his age is given rather inconsistently in census records as 40 years in 1861, 48 in 1871, and 63 [!] in 1881) in Ireland, died 27 September 1881, and buried two days later beside his parents in the yard of the Church of the Japanese Martyrs (Roman Catholic), Philipsville, Bastard Tp., the burial record giving his age as 63 years but his tombstone as a more plausible 57 years. He and his wife were in Canada by the birth of their daughter Maryanne, no later than 1848, and were possibly married in Canada. Between 1857 and 1860 they had three children baptized in (Old) St. Philip Neri Roman Catholic Church, in the town of Kitley (now Toledo), Kitley Tp., Leeds Co. We have not succeeded in locating Michael Healy in the 1852 census of Leeds County, but he appears as a farmer in Bastard Tp. in that of 1861, in which the family’s religion is given as Roman Catholic. Similar information is given in the 1871 census of Bastard & Burgess townships, Leeds County, and in 1881, when they are enumerated under the spelling Haley. Michael died before the end of the year. According to the death notice of their son John Joseph Healy (no. 14 above), there were thirteen children in this family. He married by 1852,
  13. Catharine Moran (as her name is spelled in her children’s baptismal records), born 1828-31 (aged 21 in 1852, 32 in 1861, 40 in 1871, 50 in 1881, “about 55” at her death in 1884) in Ireland, also still alive in 1881, died shortly before 17 May 1884, when as Mrs. Michael Healy she was buried “in the graveyard adjoining the R.C. church of Philipsville in the presence of John Hart and Thomas Rogers.” Catharine is found, just before her marriage, as an unmarried 21-year-old in the household of her parents in the 1852 census.
  14. Patrick McCann, of South Burgess township, Leeds County, Ontario, born apparently in 1806-16 (allegedly aged 19 at his marriage; aged 50 in 1861, 64 in 1871, aged 71 in 1880) in Ireland, died 25 July 1880 “at his residence in South Burgess (per his burial record and a death notice in the Perth Courier of 30 July 1880), and buried 27 July following in St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic Cemetery, Perth. We have not found a registration for either his or his wife’s death. The 1861 census shows that Patrick McCann and his wife were still in Ireland at the birth of their son Thomas in 1841 or 1842, but were in Ontario by the birth of their daughter Margaret in 1848 or 1849. It would appear from evidence cited below under our account of his wife that they came to Canada about 1846, and this is also the precise immigration date given for their son John in the 1901 and 1911 censuses. We have not succeeded in locating Patrick McCann in the 1852 census, but he appears as a farmer in Burgess Tp. in that of 1861, in which the family’s religion is given as Roman Catholic. Similar information is given for Patrick McCann in the 1871 census of Bastard and South Burgess townships, Leeds County. He married about 1839,
  15. Anne FitzPatrick, born about 1823 (allegedly aged 15 at her marriage; aged 38 in 1861, 50 in 1870, 66 in 1888) in Ireland, died 23 March 1888, allegedly aged 66 years, and buried 25 March following in St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic Cemetery, Perth, Drummond Tp., Lanark Co. A brief death notice for her in the Perth Courier of 30 March 1888 reads: “On Friday last there passed away from this life in the person of the late Mrs. Patrick McCann, one of the oldest and most respected settlers in this part of the country. By her kind and affable manners she endeared herself to all with whom she came into contact, and her loss will be felt not only by her sorrowing children, but by all those who had the pleasure of her acquaintance. She was the daughter of the late John Fitzpatrick, Laurel Hill, County Monaghan, Ireland, and coming to this country forty-two years ago [i.e. around 1846], settled with her husband in the county of Leeds, where she remained till her death. Although unaccustomed to the hardships of country life, [she] cheerfully undertook the burden of trials which a settler in the wild woods of Canada had to undergo. Of a family of thirteen children whom she bore nine survive her. Her death was made happy in being surrounded at the last moments by her remaining children, who in her lost a good, christian, and charitable mother.”

Generation VI

  1. Aleksandr/Oleksandr Demchuk, of house no. 205, Tsyhany, at the time of his death; born about 1785 (aged 80 in late 1865), but probably not “on the farmstead near Yaskorunya” as claimed in D. P. Demchuk’s typescript family history; died 11 December 1865, aged 80 years, and buried two days later at Tsyhany, reportedly in the old cemetery (per Demetrius P. Demchuk). It is thus evident that the tradition, reported by Demetrius P. Demchuk, that he was born in 1770 and was aged 95 at his death, is without foundation. He married by 1827,
  2. Mariya ____.
  3. Petro Panagabko, born 17 May 1807 in house no. 48, Tsyhany, and baptized in the Roman Catholic church as a child of Antonius Panagabko and Rosa ____; still alive in 1836. He married 27 October 1828 in the Catholic church, Tsyhany,
  4. Anna Krawcow, born 1809-10 (aged 18 at marriage), still alive in 1836.
  5. Wasyl Warowy, possibly the one of this name born January 1801 in house no. 40, Tsyhany, baptized in the Catholic Church, Tsyhany, son of Anton Warowy and Agnes Jakubko. His name is known from the marriage record of his son Martin (no. 22), in which it is given in the latinized form of Basilius. He married certainly by 1838 and probably by 1836,
  6. Irena Czornobaj, alive in 1838. Her first name is known only from the marriage record of her son Martin (no. 22), and her name is given in full in the baptismal record of Martin’s son Joannes (1865).
  7. Prokop Sołonynka, of house no. 41, Tsyhany, born 1820-21, and died 25 July 1844, the record stating his age as 25 years although he was probably even younger. His name is given in the latinized form of Procopius Sołonynka in the marriage record of his daughter Mariya (no. 23), and in the baptismal records of several grandchildren. As “Procopius, Jacobi et Mariannæ Sołonynka filius” (the record also gives his name in the vernacular form of Prokop Sołonynka), of house no. 41, Tsyhany, aged 25 years, he married (as her first husband) 3 November 1839 at house no. 41, Tsyhany, according to Roman Catholic rites,
  8. Agnes/Agneta Bazczak, born 1822-23, died 13 March 1849 in house no. 53, Tsyhany, and buried according to Roman Catholic rites as “Agnes, Martini Latusz uxor,” aged 25 years [sic]. She is called “Agnes, Lucæ Bazczak et Franciscæ filia” aged 22 years, in the record of her first marriage, and the same, but aged 23 [sic], in that of her second marriage on 4 November 1844 to Martin Latusz, and 25 [sic] at her death in 1849. She is called Agneta ____ in the marriage record of her daughter Mariya. She is erroneously called Anna in the baptismal records of several of her grandchildren.
  9. (Reagan)
  10. (Heaney)
  11. (Smith)
  12. John Healy, of Philipsville (sometimes spelled Phillipsville), Bastard Township, Leeds County, Ontario, farmer, born probably in 1796-97 (his age being reported, with progressive inflation, as 64 in 1861, 79 in 1871, 90 in 1881, and 98 in 1885) in co. Mayo, Ireland (per his tombstone), died 13 November 1885, and buried two days later in the yard of the Church of the Japanese Martyrs, Philipsville, Bastard Tp., where a tombstone survives. The burial is entered in the records of St. Philip Neri Roman Catholic church, in the town of Kitley (now Toledo), Kitley Tp., Leeds Co., which call him John Healy of Phillipsville, and credit him with the wildly exaggerated age of 98 years, irreconcilable with any reasonable estimate of his date of birth based on census records; the same age is given on his tombstone. It is possible this John Healy was of the neighboring township of Kitley before coming to Bastard Township, as the 1839, 1841, and 1844 censuses show a man of this name; but these pre-1852 census records supply the names only of the heads of households, so with such a common combination of names it is impossible to be sure whether they relate to our subject. John Healy and his wife have not been found in the 1852 census in Kitley Tp. or in Bastard Tp., but John “Healey,” farmer, and his wife appear in the 1861 census, very close to their son, Michael, in Bastard Tp., and they also appear in the 1871 census of Bastard & Burgess townships. “John Haley,” appears in 1881 as a widower in the household of a Francis Haley, who was doubtless his son. He married by 1821 (assuming she was the mother of all his children),
  13. Mary O’Connor, born probably around 1803 (her age being inconsistently reported as 55 in 1861, and as 73 or 75 in 1871) in Ireland, died 26 December 1871, and buried two days later in the yard of the Church of the Japanese Martyrs, the age on her tombstone being credibly given as 75 years. Her burial record, found by a correspondent in the records of St. Edward Church, Westport, Ontario, reads: “Mrs. John Healy 28 December 1871, Mary O’Connor, wife of John Healy of Bastard, age 80 [surely an exaggeration], died 26 December 1871, interred in Catholic cemetery at Philipsville. Present: Michael Healy and Francis Healy.”
  14. Anthony Moran, of Bastard Township, Leeds County, of Mara Township, Simcoe County, and of Carden Township, Victoria County North, born about 1802 (aged 50 in 1852, 58 in 1861, 68 in 1871, 76 in 1878) in Ireland, died 17 December 1878 in Victoria County, of consumption, from which he had suffered for the previous two years. He was enumerated as a farmer in Bastard Township in 1852, in Mara Township, Simcoe County, in 1861, and in Carden and Dalton Townships, Victoria County North, in 1871. He married by 1830, presumably in Ireland,
  15. Mary Connor(s), born around 1805 (aged 45 in 1852, 58 in 1861, 65 in 1871, 73 in 1881, 86 in 1891) in Ireland, still alive in 1891. Her maiden surname is given as Connor in the 1877 marriage record of her daughter Margaret, and as Connors in the 1881 marriage record of her son Patrick. The widow Mary Moran was enumerated with her son Patrick in the 1881 and 1891 censuses of Carden Township, Victoria County North.
  16. Anthony McCann, of Ireland.
  17. Molly McDonald.
  18. John FitzPatrick, of Laurel Hill, in the parish of Errigal-Trough (lying mainly in the barony of Trough, co. Monaghan, Ireland, but partly in the barony of Clogher, co. Tyrone), alive in 1828 (the earliest possible birthdate for his daughter Margaret). However, there was no-one named FitzPatrick in the parish of Errigal Trough at the taking of Griffith’s Valuation in 1848-1864. He married before 1823 (the latest possible birthdate of their daughter Anne),
  19. Bridget McLenag [McLenagh?].

Generation VII

  1. Anton Panagabko, of Tsyhany, born 1767-68, died 24 December 1825, aged 57 years, and buried according to Roman Catholic rites at Tsyhany. He is named in the marriage record of his son Petro (no. 42). His parentage has not been found, but he was presumably related in some way to no. 95 below. He married by 1795,
  2. Rosalia Cycaj, born 1769-70, died 24 October 1824, aged 54 years, and buried according to Roman Catholic rites at Tsyhany. Her first name is given in the marriage record of her son Petro (no. 42), and her full name is given in the baptismal record of her sons Ignatius (1809) and Anton (1813).
  3. Bartholomeus Krawcow, alive in 1810; named in the marriage record of his daughter Anna (no. 43).
  4. Catharina ____, alive in 1810; named in the marriage record of her daughter Anna.
  5. (?) Anton Warowy, born 1762-63 (calculated), alive in 1806. He married January 1786 in the Roman Catholic church, Tsyhany,
  6. (?) Agnes Jakubko, born 1770-71 (calculated), alive in 1806.
  7. Jacob Sołonynka, of house no. 39, Tsyhany, born 1771-72, and still alive on 14 March 1843, as at the death of his third wife she is called his wife (uxor) rather than his widow (vidua). His marriage record names him as “Jacobus Sołonynka,” of house no. 39, Tsyhany, aged 40 years, while the marriage record his son Prokop (no. 46) calls the groom “Procopius, Jacobi et Mariannæ Sołonynka filius.” He married (1) before 1801, Maria Resznyk, who died before November 1811. He married (3) 12 November 1811 at Tsyhany, according to Roman Catholic rites,
  8. Marianna Szewcuwa, born 1781-82 (aged 30 in 1811), died 14 March 1843 at house no. 39 Tsyhany, allegedly aged 45 years [surely a gross understatement], and buried two days later at Tsyhany as “Marianna, Jacobi Sołonynko [sic] uxor.” Her marriage record names her as “Marianna, Pauli Szewcuwa [?],” of Gusztyn, aged 30 years.
  9. Luca Baszczak/Bazczak, born 26 September 1792 at Tyshany, and baptized there in the Roman Catholic church as Lucas, son of Adalbertus Baszczak and Constantina Hutnik; died 2 January 1833, and buried according to Roman Catholic rites at Tsyhany. He is named in the marriage record of his daughter Agneta (no. 47). As Luca Bazczak, aged 25 (sic), son of Adalbert Bazczak (mother not named), he married 6 February 1820 in the Catholic church, Tsyhany,
  10. Francisca Panagabka, born probably in 1800 (aged 19 at her marriage, 31 in at her death), died 29 August 1831, aged 31, during a cholera epidemic in which eight other people died on the same day, and buried at Tsyhany according to Roman Catholic rites as “Francisca, Lucæ Bazczak uxor.” Her first name is given in the marriage record of her daughter Agneta, and her own marriage record names her parents as Anton Panagabko and Agneta ____.

Generation VIII

  1. Joseph Cycaj.
  2. ________.
  3. Joannes Petrykow.
  4. ________.
  5. Paulus Szewcuw, of Gusztyn [Гуштин], in Borszczów, named in the marriage record of his daughter Marianna (no. 93).
  6. ________.
  7. Adalbert Baszczak, born about 1758, died 24 April 1809, aged 50 years, and buried at Tsyhany. He is named as Adalbertus Baszczak in the baptismal record of his son Luca (no. 94), and as Adalbertus Bazczak in the marriage record of the same son. He married by 1792,
  8. Constantia/Constantina Hutnik, born about 1758-59, died 5 June 1829, aged 70, and buried at Tsyhany as “Constantia, Adalberti Bazczak vidua.” She was living in house no. 52, Tsyhany, at the time of her death. She is named as Constantina Hutnik in the baptismal record of her son Luca.
  9. Anton Panagabko (not the same as no. 84 above), of Tsyhany, born say 1750, alive in 1800 but died before 6 March 1819 (when his wife is called his widow in her burial record). He is named as Antonius Panagabko in the marriage record of his daughter Francisca. He married by about 1800,
  10. Agneta ____, born 1756-57, died 6 March 1819, aged 62 years, at house no. 21, Tsyhany, and buried as “Agnes Antonii Panagabko uxor vidua.” Her surname is given in the baptismal records of her children Mathias and Magdalena, but seems to be given as Skarpinska in the former and as something resembling "Laskardka" in the other.

From the Genealogy Page of John Blythe Dobson
URL = johnblythedobson.org/genealogy/AT/Lubiniecki-AT.html
This page first appeared 15 June 2001
Last revised 12 January 2020