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D E M C H U K

Preface

When we began our research on this family we were unaware of the typescript Demchuk family history by Demetrius Paul Demchuk, of Grandview, Manitoba, a copy of which was later given to us by Larry Hrehirchuk, of Winnipeg.[1] Thus we in fact began with Vladimir J. Kaye’s Dictionary of Ukrainian Canadian Biography — [vol. 1] Pioneer Settlers of Manitoba, 1891-1900, which lists Wasyl Demchuk (ca. 1857-1934) and Ivan Demchuk (ca. 1863-1905+), who both came from Tsyhany [Цигани] (known as Rudka during the Soviet period), in the district of Borshchiv, oblast of Ternopil’, and province of Galicia, Austria (formerly part of Ukraine), in 1898, although on different ships.[2] If they were kinsmen, we have failed to find any direct evidence on this point. Wasyl Demchuk’s son Toma, interviewed in the 1980s, rather vaguely stated that “other Demchuks came to Canada, but they settled elsewhere: one at Gilbert Plains and one at Benito.”[3] Demetrius P. Demchuk’s manuscript genealogy mentions “one Mikhail Demchuk who was born near Kolomya, under the Carpathian mountains and farmed near Ethelbert in Manitoba,” and who had a concordant family tradition regarding “two brothers who left wealth in Russia and fled to seek freedom in Austria.”[4]

In these notes, while an attempt has been made to supply likely Cyrillic versions of names as an aid to further research, we disclaim any expertise in the Ukrainian language, and warn that these versions have in most cases been inferred from indirect evidence, so may not correspond to contemporary recordings of these names in Ukrainian sources. However the spelling of the name Demchuk [Демчук] has been definitely confirmed in a documentary source.

Thanks are due to the following persons for assistance with these notes:

  • Larry Hrehirchuk, of Winnipeg, who has supplied much material from his extensive files on the Demchuk family, including a copy of Demetrius P. Demchuk’s typescript Demchuk history (see links at the end of these notes)
  • Sam Knight Gershen and Mary (Allen) Blahitka, for information on the Blahitka family
  • The brothers Chris and Mike Bostwick, descendants of the Baszczak and Panagabko families, who kindly provided copies of the baptismal records of Petronilla Demchuk, and of Kateryna and Mariya Demchuk
  • Shirley Bomak, daughter-in-law of a brother of Peter Bomak, late husband of Joyce Danylishen, for information on the Bomak family
  • Carrie (Dyck) Campbell, a great-granddaughter of Michael Trush and Paulina Demchuk, who supplied information on their family, along with several family photographs
  • Dr. Dave Demchuk
  • Gary Duschl (not a Demchuk decendant), author of the Kuzyk Family Tree at MyHeritage.com, who kindly shared his extensive researches in the registers of the Catholic church, Tsyhany (including the marriage record of Wasyl Demchuk and Antonina Warowy), and offered many helpful suggestions as to their interpretation.

An associated page on this website is our Ancestor table of the children of Leo James Lubiniecki and Alma Cecilia Reagan.

Introduction

In our account below, the first generation of the direct line is taken from the work of Demetrius P. Demchuk, which has not been corroborated with documentary evidence; we have somewhat revised his spelling, which is Anglicized and inconsistent. From that point onward documentary evidence has been found for the connections, if not for all of the dates. D. P. Demchuk’s knowledge of the dates is explained in a passage of his narrative, in which he states:

In the village Tzihani there are two cemeteries, or at least were two in my days. One small “Old” cemetery fenced with a deep fossa or ditch, surrounded with a large bass tree and located on the northeast side of the Count Bilecki’s dvir or farmstead…. Both strys [uncles], Wasil and Fedor Jr., assured me that all Demchuks buried on that cemetery had the tombstones with their names inscribed by the man who sold the tombstones, and dates of the years of birth and deaths, and all of them Stry Wasil copied the names into the prayer book like we in Canada, keep the records in the bibles. Only on first Michael Demyanchuk-Demchuk’s tombstone there was no inscription. Yet both strys, Wasil and Fedor Jr., were sure of his grave and that he was born in the fall (November) and moved into Austria at the age of thirty years.

Alas, the whereabouts of the prayer book into which the tomstone inscriptions were copied does not seem to be known. D. P. Demchuk’s discussion of the family’s lineage is somewhat scattered, but the main outline is given in the following passage, near the end of the work:

It would be around 1748 A. D. [that the] first Michael Demyanchuk-Demchuk was born…. Olexa (Alexander), [the] first Michael’s son, was born on the farmstead near Yaskorunya in the year 1770 [he was in fact born about 1785] and died in [December] 1865, which means that he lived for 95 years [his death record gives his age as 80 years]. His wife’s name was Marina, or Maria. Both were buried on the old cemetery. (Olexa was seven years old when [the family] moved into Austria.) … Olexa and Maria had three sons and two girls, [the sons being] Fedor, Danil and Mikhail…. Fedor, my grandfather, was born in the village Tzihani in the year 18__ A. D., died in April [actually March] 1866 A. D. and was buried in the new cemetery on the west side of the village Tzihani. He was married to Anna Bilinski [no, Mariya Panagabka] and they had four sons and one girl: Paul (my father), Wasil, Fedor J., and Stefan (died young boy) and Petrunelia.

Had the work been completed within the lifetimes of the writer’s uncles Wasyl and Fedor, its failure to mention their mother, Mariya Panagabka, would surely not have gone unnoticed. The substitution of the name Anna Bilinski for Mariya Panagabka is perhaps attributable, at least in part, to the fact that on 16 November 1856 Mariya’s sister, Magdalena, was married at Tsyhany to Franciscus Bilinski, son of Vincentius and Anna, of Borszczow.[5] If Mariya Panagabka died while her children were still young, perhaps the Bilinski family was involved in their upbringing.
    The manifest of the ship on which the Canadian branch of this line of the family arrived in 1898 would seem, according to Kaye’s account, to give ages for the children. However, comparison of these with their birthdates as stated in the 1901 census and ages as stated in the 1906 census, which are for the most part in fairly good agreement, force the conclusion that the ages stated on the manifest are completely unreliable.

              age in 1898     age in       age in       age in
        according to Kaye     June 1898*   July 1898**  June 1898**
-------------------------------------------------------------------
    Stefan             17     12           13            11
    Katharina           5     --           10            --
    Maria               4      6            7 [or 8]     --
    Ilash [Oleksandr]   4      3            6-7         5-6
    Hnat                1      1            2            --
--------------------------------------------------------------------
 * calculated from date of birth, or age, as given in 1901 census
** Age as given in 1906 census, minus 8 years
** calculated from date of birth, or age, as given in 1911 census

Armed with Stefan’s drastically-revised birthdate from the 1901 census, it became clear that he was born well after the marriage of his father to Antonina Warowy, and so the supposition made in earlier versions of these notes that he was his father’s son by an unknown first wife is groundless, and must be retracted.
    Another listing of this family is supplied by the letters of administration on the estate of the son Hnat, who died young and intestate in 1924. On 30 June 1924 his heirs were listed as:[6]

  • Wasyl Demchuk, father, aged 67 years
  • Jantoska Demchuk, mother, aged 54 years
  • Stefan Demchuk, brother, aged 36 years
  • Kateryna Lubinetsky [i.e. Lubiniecki], sister, aged 33 years
  • Marynka Buyar, sister, aged 30 years
  • Alec Demchuk, brother, aged 27 years
  • Pawlina Trush, sister, aged 22 years
  • Tomko Demchuk, brother, aged 20 years
  • Tanashko Demchuk, brother, aged 18 years
  • Natalie Demchuk, sister, aged 16 years
  • Helen Demchuk, sister, aged 11 years

    Wasyl Demchuk was possibly uncle to Sylvester Demchuk,[7] who is grouped with the “nephews” mentioned as pallbearers in the 1963 death notice of Wasyl’s widow, Antonina (therein called Antonia). Sylvester was demonstrably not a son of Fred Demchuk, another early settler of the Dauphin area who was also from the Borshchiv District but not Tsyhany.[8] Therefore he may have been a son of Ivan Demchuk, the only other early settler of this surname. However, it is possible, and perhaps likelier, that the death notice included him among Antonina’s nephews in error, and that he was really her grandson Sylvester, son of her son Oleksandr.
    The surname Demchuk is found as Demczuk in all of the Catholic church records of Tsyhany, because Catholic priests used Polish transliterations when writing Ukrainian names in the Roman alphabet. In Canadian records it generally appears as Demchuk, but occasionally as Demtchuk, Damchuk, or Damchak (as in the 1901 census), and also in the Polish form of Demczuk (as in the 1884 marriage record of Wasyl Demchuk, in the 1906 census, and in several later marriage records).


1. Mykhail Demchuk [Михаил Демчук], said to have been born in November 1748, died ____. He is said to have married Mariya, sister to Anastazia wife of his brother Wasyl, and daughter of Oleksandr Yakovlev and the latter’s wife Kateryna. According to D. P. Demchuk, the two couples left Russia in 1778 and went to Tsyhany, aforesaid. According to Demetrius P. Demchuk, there were two sons, of whom the name of one is unknown; we suggest a possibility for this other son below. Known issue:

  1. (perhaps) Joannes Demchuk, of house no. 116, Tsyhany, born say 1780, named as the (surviving) husband of Parasceva Demchuk, born 1785-86, died 10 June 1839 in house no. 39, Tsyhany, aged 53 years, and buried two days later at Tsyhany.[9]
  2. 2Aleksandr/Oleksandr Demchuk, born about 1785.

2. Aleksandr Demchuk [Александр Демчук], of house no. 205, Tsyhany, at the time of his death, was born about 1785 (aged 80 in late 1865), died 11 December 1865, aged 80 years, and was buried two days later at Tsyhany,[10] reportedly in the old cemetery (per Demetrius P. Demchuk). It is thus evident that the tradition, reported by Demetrius P. Demchuk, that he was born in 1770 and was aged 95 at his death, is without foundation; and thus the statement that he was born at “the farmstead near Yaskorunya” is incompatible with the claim that his father came to Tsyhany in 1778. Aleksandr Demchuk married by 1827, Mariya ____, still alive about 1826. In the 1859 baptismal record of their granddaughter Petronella (below), their son Fedor is named (in latinized-polonicized form) as Theodorus Demczuk, son of Alexius Demczuk and Maria ____. In the 1881 baptismal record of their grandson Alexander (see below), their son Mikhail is called Nichael Demczuk, son of Alexander Demczuk and Maria ____. D. P. Demchuk states: “Olexa and Maria had three sons and two girls. Fedor, Danil[o] and Mikhail (whom I visited in 1910 A.D.). Both girls married boys at the village Zhilintzi; one was a church cantor and another was a village policeman.” Known issue:

  1. 3Fedor Demchuk, born about 1826-27.
  2. Danilo Demchuk; said by his grandnephew D. P. Demchuk to have married ____ Boverski, the daughter of a large estate-owner, and converted to Roman Catholicism. D. P. Demchuk writes: “Both strys Wasil and Fedor said that Daniel after three years’ service in Austrian army has been employed as a manager and supervised the estate of family Boverski. Boverski were a wealthy family, owners of many acres of cultivated land and forest. Daniel married Boverski’s daughter, became Roman Catholic, and enjoyed his life. Later his sons became forest rangers. Both strys Wasil and Fedor Jr. considered Daniel Demchuk as an outcast because all the Demchuks were of Orthodox faith and Daniel became Roman Catholic and considered himself a Pole…. Although Daniel lived only few kilometers from our village, on the west side of village Losiach [Losyach], we never exchanged the visits…. It may be that some of Danilo’s offspring consider themselves as Polish Demchuks. I have not heard of any.”
  3. Mikhail Demchuk, still alive in August 1910. He is called “Michael, Alexii Demczuk et Maria[e]” in the baptismal records of his sons Cornelius and Alexander. D. P. Demchuk states: “Mikhail enlisted as freelancer before he was conscripted and served for only one year as a cadet or student in military Academy, and that might have been the main reason that he evaded conscription and became the proprietor of the Demchuks’ farmstead.” he married (1?) before 1876, Marta Stefanow, who apparently died shortly after the birth of her daughter Anastasia about 1885, daughter of Stefan Stefanow and Maria Andrzejewski (named in the baptismal record of her son Alexander). D. P. Demchuk states that her father was very wealthy, and that she studied Music and Fine Art in Italy. He possibly married (2) Maria ____, who as “Maria, uxor Michaelis Demczuk, agricola” died 1 June 1897 in house no. 168, Tsyhany, aged 60 years, of old age, and was buried two days later.[11] He married (2 or 3), Marusya ____, whom D. P. Demchuk mentions meeting as a teenager during a visit this family in 1910. D. P. Demchuk names Mikhail’s children as Franko, Bronislaw, and Anastazia (“Nastoonya”), born ca. 1885, without mentioning Cornelius or Alexander, who perhaps died young, and he quotes his cousin Nastoonya as referring to him and herself as being both “motherless orphans.” Known issue:
    1. Franko Demchuk, position uncertain but likely the eldest son.
    2. Josef Demchuk, died [in infancy] in March 1876 [age obscured in shadow on microfilm of record], and buried as “Josephus, Michaelis Demczuk…” (rest of entry illegible).[12]
    3. Cornelius Demchuk, born 18 March 1877 in house no. 52, Tsyhany, baptized the same day in the Greek Catholic church as a child of “Michael, Alexii Demczuk et Maria[e]” and “Marta, Stephani Stephani__ [illegible] et Mariæ.”[13]
    4. Bronislaw (“Bronko”) Demchuk, born 2 September 1880 in house no. 52, Tsyhany, baptized the next dau in the Greek Catholic church as a child of “Michael, Alexii Demczuk et Maria[e]” and “Marta, Stephani Stephaniuk et Maria[e].”[14] died P. Demchuk notes that he became a school-teacher.
    5. Alexander Demchuk, born 18 July 1882, baptized as a child of “Michael, Alexii Demczuk et Maria” and “Marta, Stephani Stephanow et Mariæ Andrzejewski.”[15]
    6. Anastasia (“Nastoonya”), born ca. 1885 as D. P. Demchuk describes her as being about 10 years older than himself.

3. Fedor Demchuk [Федор Демчук], a landowner at Tsyhany, son of Aleksandr Demchuk and Mariya ____, was born about 1826-27 (aged 39 in 1866), died 19 March 1866 (not in April of that year as stated by Demetrius P. Demchuk), aged 39 years, and was buried two days later at Tsyhany,[16] “in the new cemetery on the west side of the village” (according to Demetrius P. Demchuk). His death occurred within two weeks of that of his son Nicolaus, possibly suggesting illness in the family. His burial record calls him Theodorus Demczuk, of house no. 184, Tsyhany. No evidence has been found to support the claim of Demetrius P. Demchuk that this man had a wife named Anna Bilinski [Анна Билински]. In fact Fedor married (as her first husband) by 1852, Mariya Panagabka [Мариа Панагабка], born 1830-31 (aged 38 in 1869), still alive in 1869 (the date of her second marriage), daughter of Petro Panagabko [Петро Панагабко] and Anna Krawcow. The fact that Maria was the mother of all the known children is proved by the burial records of her sons Nicolaus and Stefan, by the marriage records of her sons Paul and Wasyl, and most of all by the baptismal record of her daughter Petronella, baptized 12 July 1859 at Tsyhany, which names the parents (in latinized form) as Theodorus Demczuk (son of Alexius Demchuk and Maria ____) and Maria Panagabka (daughter of Petrus Panagabko and Anna ____). Furthermore, the baptismal records of two of Wasyl’s daughters, Kateryna (1889) and Mariya (1892), and of two of Wasyl’s brother Fedor’s daughters, Maria (1887) and Petronella (1892), all name the paternal grandparents as Theodorus Demczuk and Maria ____. Mariya married (2) 14 November 1869 in house no. 3, Tsyhany,[17] Joannes Sytnik, born 1840-41 (aged 28 in 1869), son of Andreas Sytnik and Anna ____. Fedor’s grandson D. P. Demchuk states respecting the children: “they had four sons and one girl: Paul (my father), Wasil, Fedor J., and Stefan (died young boy) and Petrunelia.”
    Issue (descendants being researched by Larry Hrehirchuk):

  1. Paul Demchuk, of Tsyhany, born there July 1852, died [there] 30 October 1920, and “buried in the new cemetery.”[18] He married (1) 21 October 1875 in house no. 48, Tsyhany, according to Catholic rites,[19] Agnes Krzyskow, born 21 April 1858, and baptized the same day at Tsyhany as a daughter of Antonius Krzyskow (son of Casimirus Krzyskow and Catharina ____) and Anna Bazczak (daughter of Josephus Bazczak and Anna ____),[20] certainly alive in March 1892, but died before 1910. Their marriage record describes them as “Paulus, Theodori et Mariæ Demczuk filius,” aged 23 years, and “Agnes, Antonii et Annæ Krzyskow [filia],” aged 17 years. This record is supported by the description of Agnes in the baptismal records of her children Maria (1876) and Agnes (1892).[21] The fact that the son Demetrius P. Demchuk, born in 1895, names his mother as “Yagna Baschuk,” would seem to reflect a confusion between Agnes and her own mother, suggesting the possibility that Anna (Bazczak) Krzyskow may have outlived Agnes and helped raise Agnes’s children. Paul Demchuk and Agnes Krzyskow had seven surviving children, all born at Tsyhany. Paul Demchuk married (2) before August 1910, Anna ____, alive in 1910, by whom he had no issue. D. P. Demchuk lists the children (sons, then daughters) as: Mikhail, Fedor, Dimitri [himself], Gregory (“Harry”), Ury, Maria (m. Peter Skochilas), Yagna. In another passage he adds: “Maria, Michael and Ury married in their native village, lived their lives there, raised their children then died there. Theodore (‘Fred’), Yagna, Dimitri, and Gregory (‘Harry’) came to Canada, married in Canada and raised their families.”
        Issue, all by first wife (order partly inferential):[22]
    1. Maria Demchuk, born 9 September 1876 in house no. 48, Tsyhany, baptized the next day in the Greek Catholic Church as a child of “Paulus, Theodori Demczuk et Maria[e] filius” and “Agnes, Antonii Krzyskow et Annæ.”[23] Acording to her brother D. P. Demchuk, she spent his entire life at Tsyhany. She married 4 November 1894 in house no. 217, Tsyhany, according to Catholic rites,[24] Peter Skoczylas/Skochilas, born 1869-70 (by calculation), son of Procopius Skoczylas and Maria ____. Their marriage record calls them “Maria, Pauli et Agnetis Demczuk,” aged 18 years [an understatement] and “Petrus, Procopii et Mariæ Skoczylas filius,” aged 24 years.
    2. Mikhail Demchuk, born at Tsyhany and acording to his brother D. P. Demchuk spent his entire life there.
    3. Fedor Demchuk, born at Tsyhany. According to his brother D. P. Demchuk, he came to Canada. He married by 1907, Katherine ____, and had 12 children.
    4. Anna Demchuk, born 18 July 1890 in house no. 48, Tsyhany, baptized the same day in the Greek Catholic Church as a child of “Paulus, Theodori Demczuk et Mariæ” and “Agnes, Antonii Krzyskow et Annæ filia,”[25] died 21 April 1892 (annotation in baptismal record); not mentioned by her brother D. P. Demchuk.
    5. Agnes (“Yagna”) Demchuk, born 19 September 1893 in house no. 217, Tsyhany, baptized the next day in the Roman Catholic Church as a child of “Paulus, Theodori Demczuk et Maria[e]” and “Agnes, Antonii Krzyskow et Anna[e],”[26] the only surviving sibling of her brother Demetrius. She married ____ Motlyk, and in 1978 was living at Hudson Bay, Saskatchewan.
    6. Demetrius Paul Demchuk, of Grandview, Manitoba, born [16 Nov.?] 1895 at Tsyhany, died 5 December 1978 at Grandview, aged 83 years.[27] He came to Canada in 1911, originally settling at Aaron, Saskatchewan. He married 24 September 1921 at Drifting River, Manitoba, Maria Joss, born 1903-04 (by calculation), died 9 December 1988 at Grandview, aged 84 years.[28] They had 5 children. His death notice reads, in part: “He attended Teacher’s School at Regina and later taught at Ethelbert. He later operated a general store in Grifton and in 1932 he moved to Granview where he operated a store. Surviving are his wife Maria, one son, Modest at Benito, Man., three daughters, (Leda) Mrs. Henry Podealuk at Beausejour, (Larrisa) Mrs. Roy Hooly at Vancouver, and Mrs. Leona Milroy at Vancouver. One sister Agnes Motlyk lives at Hudson Bay, Sask. There are 13 grandchildren and one great-grandchild…. Interment was in Grandview Memorial Gardens.” His wife’s death notice includes the additional information that she was ”predeceased … by two daughters, Leona Milroy and Nadia Demchuk.”
    7. Gregory (“Harry”) Demchuk, born at Tshany. According to his brother D. P. Demchuk, he came to Canada. He married Julia ____, and had 4 children.
    8. Ury Demchuk, born at Tsyhany and acording to his brother D. P. Demchuk spent his entire life there.
  2. Stefan Demchuk, born 1854-55, died 1 August 1868, aged 13 years, and buried the next day at Tsyhany as “Stephanus, filius Theodori & Mariæ Demczuk,” of house no. 48.[29]
  3. 4Wasyl (“William”) Demchuk, born in December 1856 (per the 1911 census) or in 1857 (according to his tombstone and his nephew D. P. Demchuk, died 7 March 1934 at the General Hospital, Dauphin, Manitoba, Canada.
  4. Fedor (“Fred”) Demchuk, Jr., born 1860 at Borszczov (according to his death notice), died 10 May 1946 at Dauphin, and buried in Riverside Cemetery.[30] He married (1) by 1887,[31] Paulina Krawiec, born 1870, died 17 July 1942 in an influenza epidemic,[32] daughter of Joannes Krawiec (or Krawcow?). Her surname is given as Krawiec in the baptismal record of her daughter Petronela. In the baptismal records of their daughters Maria (1887) and Petronela (1892) Fedor is called “Theodorus, Theodori Demczuk et Mariæ.” They came with their older children to Canada on the S. S. Brazilia, arriving at Halifax on 9 June 1899. They settled in the Sifton area and had eight children, of whom the first six were born in Ukraine. They are found at Dauphin in the 1916 census, in the portion covering Township 26, ranges 18, 19 and 20, West of the Principal Meridian.[33] He married (2) Mary Glina, who survived him. His death notice in the Dauphin Herald reads:
    The death of Mr. Fred Demchuk of Dauphin occured at his residence on Friday, May 10 [1946], after an illness of four years. He was 86 years of age. Born in the village of Borchrow [Borshchiv] in Austria, and married to Pauline Krawech in 1893, they came to Canada in 1898 and resided in Sifton for eight years. They move to Saskatchewan and Alberta within the next six years, and in 1934 came to Dauphin. Mr. Demchuk served with the Austrian Imperial army before coming to Canada, and for 35 years he farmed. His wife predeceased him in 1942, and he married again to Mary Glina. Besides Mrs. Demchuk, there are four children out of a family of 13 surviving. They are: Mrs. John Zogrodney of Fosston, Sask., Mrs. Wm. Pamchuk [i.e. Panchuk] of Windsor, Onta., Nick of Keld, and Metro of the Canadian army now overseas. There are 21 grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren.
        Funeral services were held from the Greek Catholic church … on Monday, May 13. Interment was made in the Riverside Cemetery. Pallbearers were: Tom Demchuk, Staney Demchuk, Joe Zagrodney, John Zagrodney, Nick Demchuk and Alex Demchuk.
    Later statements respecting the composition of this family are somewhat contradictory. D. P. Demchuk, who says nothing of the son Wasyl, lists the children (sons, then daughtes) as Nikola, Ivan, Dimitri, Maria, Lujbina and Anastazia, and of these Ivan and Lujbina have not been found mentioned elswehere. The funeral program of the daughter Elizabeth (Demchuk) Zagrodney describes her as “the last surviving member of her family of three brothers, William, Nick, and Stanley, and four sisters, Mary, Nellie, Mollie, and Ann,”[34] and of these Mollie has not been found mentioned elsewhere. Known issue (order partly inferential):[35]
    1. Maria Demchuk, born 25 August 1887 in house no. 79, Tsyhany, baptized the same day in the Greek Catholic church as Maria, daughter of “Theodorus, Theodori Demczuk et Maria[e]” and “Paulina, Joannis Kracow et Anna[e],”[36] died 22 May 1918 during an influenza epidemic.[37] She married (as his frist wife) Nykola Balan, born 22 May 1880, died 30 October 1956 at Gilbert Plains, Manitoba, and buried at Zoria, Manitoba. He afterward married (2) Paraska (“Pearl”) ____, and (3) a Mrs. Hrushowy. Maria and her husband had 6 children. Their daughter Pauline (Balan) Hrehirchuk was the mother of our informant Larry Hrehirchuk.
    2. Wasyl Demchuk (who for unknown reasons changed his name to William Fretz), born 4 March 1892 at Losiach [Losyach], Borshchiv district, still alive in 1945, when he was living at Grenfell, Saskatchewan. He married 18 November 1917 in Holy Trinity, Wostok, Alberta (but they subsequently separated), Dominika Hunka, born 14 October 1901 at Zaveleu Sniatyn, Galicia, died 3 March 1985 in Alberta. They had 7 children (surname Fretz).
    3. Petronela Demchuk, born 23 June 1894 in house no. 246, Tsyhany, baptized the same day in the Greek Catholic church as Petronela, daughter of “Theodorus, Theodori Demczuk et Mariæ” and “Paulina, Joannis Krawiec et Annæ,”[38] died 4 July 1895 (annotation in baptismal record).
    4. Elizabeth Demchuk, born 15 April 1897, died 24 April 1990, aged over 93 years, and buried in Kelvingrove Cemetery, Kelvington, Saskatchewan.[39] She married 20 November 1913 at Sifton, John Zagrodney, born 20 June 1891 in Austria, died 1 February 1962, and buried in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, Fosston, Saskatchewan, son of Jacob Zagrodney and Antonia Rynabozka. They moved to Val Marie, Saskatchewan, in 1928.[40] They had at 5 children.
    5. Nellie Demchuk, born 7 July 1900 at Valley River, Manitoba, died 12 February 1922, aged only 21 years. She married Michael Garlinski, son of Andrew Garlinski and Pauline ____.[41]
    6. Mikola (“Nick”) Frederick Demchuk, born 27 April 1904 in the Rural Municipality of Dauphin, Manitoba,[42] died 2 April 1984, and buried in Riverside Cemetery, Dauphin. He was of Keld at his father’s death. He married 20 May 1927 at Dauphin, Margaret Palaluk, born 38 February 1907 in Poland, died 1 December 1972, and buried in Riverside Cemetery, Dauphin. They had 5 children, of whom their son John was father of Dave Demchuk, one of our informants.
    7. Anna Demchuk, born 25 October 1908 at Mink Creek, Manitoba, died 12 May 1976 at Windsor, Ontario, and buried in Victorial Memorial Cemetery.[43] She married William Panchuk, of Windsor.
    8. Dimitri (“Metro” a.k.a. Stanley) Demchuk, born 1910-11 (aged 5 in 1916), lived at Vancouver and died there, probably unmarried, in the mid 1970s (information from his grandnephew, Dave Demchuk). He was serving with the American Forces at the time of his father’s death, and is mentioned as Stanley in his mother’s funeral program.
  5. Petronella Demchuk, born 12 July 1862 in house no. 184, Tsyhany, baptized the same day as Petronella, daughter of Theodorus Demczuk (son of Alexius Demchuk and Maria ____) and Maria Panagabka (daughter of Petrus Panagabko and Anna ____).[44] As Petronela Demczuk, aged 17 [sic], daughter of Theodorus Demczuk and Maria ____, she married in December 1878 in the Catholic Church, Tsyhany,[45] Peter Krzyskow, son of Franciscus Krzyskow and Anna ____. D. P. Demchuk, who calls her Petrulia, states that they went to Poland. But if so, this was not until after 1881, when they had a child born at Tsyhany. Known issue:
    1. Catharina Krzyskow, born 12 November 1881 in house no. 184, Tsyhany, baptized the same day as Catharina, daughter of “Petrus, Francisci Krzyskow et Annæ filius” and “Petronela, Theodori Demczuk et Maria[e] filia,”[46] died by 1889, when another daughter was given the same name.
    2. Josefa Krzyskow, born 23 January 1887 in house no. 184, Tsyhany, baptized the same day as Josefa, daughter of “Petrus, Francisci Krzyskow et Annæ filius” and “Petronela, Theodori Demczuk et Annæ [an error for Mariæ] filia.”[47]
    3. Catharina Krzyskow, born 26 November 1889 in house no. 143, Tsyhany, baptized the same day as Catarina, daughter of “Petrus, Francisci Krzyskow et Annæ” and “Petronela, Theodori Demczuk et Annæ [an error for Mariæ] filia.”[48]
    4. Michael Krzyskow, born 5 August 1892 in house no. 143, Tsyhany, baptized the same day as Michael, son of “Petrus, Francisci Krzyskow et Annæ” and “Petronela, Theodori Demczuk et Mariæ.”[49]
  6. Nicolaus Demchuk, born 1864-65, died 6 March 1866, aged 1 year, and buried two days later at Tsyhany as “Nicolaus, filius Theodori & Mariæ Demczuk,” of house no. 184, Tsyhany.[50] This child was unknown to Demetrius P. Demchuk.

4. Wasyl (“William”) Demchuk [Василь Демчук],[51] son of Fedor Demchuk and Mariya Panagabka, was born in December 1856 (per the 1911 census) or in 1857 (according to his tombstone and his nephew D. P. Demchuk)[52] or 1858-60 (marriage record gives his age as 24 in June 1884) or 1 August 1860 (according to the 1901 census) at Tsyhany, aforesaid, died 7 March 1934 at the General Hospital, Dauphin, Manitoba, Canada,[53] allegedly aged “77 yrs.,”[54] and was buried in St. Josaphat’s Ukrainian Catholic Cemetery, Sifton.[55] Although the name Wasyl is etymologically equivalent to Basil, Canadian immigrants with the name tended to adopt the substitution William. He married 1 June 1884 in the Greek Catholic Church, Tsyhany,[56] Antonina Warowy, born at Tsyhany probably in 1865-66,[57] Antonina (Warowy) Demchuk d. 5 October 1963 at Dauphin, stated in her death notice to have been “in her 95th year” (literally, aged 94 years),[58] and on her tombstone to have “lived 95 years,” and buried in the new section of St. Josaphat’s Cemetery (not beside her husband, where there was apparently no room remaining), daughter of Martin Warowy and Mariya Sołonynka.[59] Their marriage record, in latin, records their names as “Bazilius, Theodori et Mariae Demczuk filius” and “Antonina, Martinii et Mariae Warowy filia,” and gives their ages as 18 and 24, respectively.
    Wasyl Demchuk is said by his Lubiniecki descendants to have been a land overseer before his immigration.[60] He brought his family to Canada in 1898 on the Christiania, arriving at Halifax on 12 July 1898. On 26 August following, as “Wasyl Demtchuk, farmer” he applied (successfully) for a patent to the southeast quarter of section 30, township 27, range 20 West of the Principal Meridian, at Valley River, near Sifton, Manitoba, where he was enumerated as a farmer in the censuses of 1901[61] 1906,[62] and 1911,[63] and where he is listed in a directory published in 1923.[64] He was naturalized on 31 March 1902.[65] He was an early member of St. Josaphat’s church.[66] He should not be confused with an apparently unrelated and somewhat older Wasyl Demchuk (1834-1926) of Rockwood, Manitoba, mentioned above. Some account of him and his family is provided by the interview with his son Toma made in the 1980s, and already cited above:

My parents arrived in Canada in 1898 and joined the Steve Shykulski family who arrived in the Sifton area in 1897 [actually 1898; Steve Shykulski was the husband of Agnes Warowy, Antonina’s sister]. They brought five children with them and five others were born in Canada. From the first day on the farm five miles west and one mile south of Sifton they started to work hard — we all worked hard — and finally had the homestead fairly well developed. Though the soil was light it was not as poor a land as it was in the stony areas farther west; but it was wet.
    We children attended the Ukraina school…. All the children in my parents’ family had to go out and work, though one Demchuk [i.e. Nathaniel] was a teacher. I worked hard in Fort William and later went to Chicago.

Another account of him is given by his nephew, Demetrius P. Demchuk, in the latter’s manuscript Demchuk history:

Wasil was the second son of Fedor and Anna. Wasil was born in the village Tzihani in the month ____ 1857 A.D. and died at Sifton in Manitoba, Canada on March 7th 1934, buried in the Sifton cemetery. Wasil Demchuk married Antonia Warowy in Tzihani. Antonia was born in the same village on ____ and died October 5th, 1968 [sic, at least in typewritten copy; should be 1963].

    His death notice (cited above) states, “The funeral of Wasyl Demchuk … took place Saturday afternoon from the family residence, seven miles southwest of Sifton, to the Greek Catholic Church, in Sifton, with Rev. J. Kolcun, Ethelbert, in charge. Interment was made in the Greek Catholic Cemetery.”
    His widow is mentioned in a newspaper society column in the summer of 1947: “Mrs. A. Demchuk left Tuesday morning for Windsor, Ont., where she will visit her daughter, Mrs. Bill Blahitka. [Her grandson] Eugene Blahitka accompanied her, after spending his holidays with relatives in Sifton.”[67] Her death notice reads, in part:

Mrs. Antonia Demchuk, one of the Dauphin area’s pioneer citizens, passed away in Dauphin on Saturday, October 5, in her 95th year. Funeral services were held from the Sifton Ukrainian Catholic Church Thursday, October 10, with Very Rev. Dean G. Oucharyk officiating. Pallbearers were: James Danylishen, Peter Pomak, Ernest Trush, Sylvester Demchuk, Ted Trush and Don Trush, nephews of the deceased. Interment took place in the Sifton parish cemetery….
    Antonia Waroway [sic] was born in Austria, and came to Canada to the Sifton area in 1899 [recte 1898], where she homesteaded until retiring in 1934. She moved to Dauphin in 1962. She married William Demchuk in Austria in 1882. He predeceased her in 1939. She was active in the Ukrainian Catholic sisterhood in Sifton.
    She was survived by three sons and four daughters: Alex, Tom, and Tony, all of Sifton; Mrs. Mary Buyar, Mrs. Helen Danylishen, Dauphin; Mrs. Pauline Trush, Sifton; Mrs. William Blahitka (Natalie), Detroit, Mich. There are 40 grandchildren, 81 great-grandchildren and 12 great-great-grandchildren.

As mentioned above, their son Toma, interviewed in the 1980s, stated, “my parents … brought five children with them and five others were born in Canada.” According to the birth certificate of their daughter Paulina, who was the sixth of these (living) children, she was their tenth “liveborn” child, implying that there were four children older than her who died in infancy.

    Known issue (order partly inferential):

  1. 5Stefan (“Stephen”) Demchuk, born 2 August 1884 (according to the 1901 census) or in December 1886 (according to the 1911 census) in Galicia.
  2. Kateryna Demchuk, born 3 June 1889 (per baptismal record) at Tsyhany, baptized the same day in the Greek Catholic church, Tsyhany, as a child of “Basilius, Theodori Demczuk et Mariæ:” and “Antonina, Martini Warowy et Mariæ,” with godmother Thecla Panagabka,[68] died 24 May 1945 at Sturgis, aged over 55 years.[69] The Lubiniecki family has preserved a correct tradition of her birthdate being 1889,[70] which agrees with the statement in her marriage certificate that she was 15 years of age at the time. It is however reported incorrectly in a number of sources.[71] She married 15 May 1904 at Winnipeg,[72] Julian Lubiniecki, born 7 July 1880 (?) at Jazlowiec, in the province of Podolia, Poland (now Pomortsy in Ukraine), living 1945 at Regina, Saskatchewan, son of Anton Lubiniecki, of Jazlowiec and of Dauphin, Manitoba, by the latter’s wife Maria (or Mariana) Nasadnik or Nyczek. He came to the Keld District, near Dauphin, Manitoba, possibly so early as 1897 (as claimed in the entry for him in the 1906 census), and certainly by 1901, when as “Julian Lubinickie” he is enumerated in the census of the town of Morton, near Brandon, as a domestic servant in the household of a George Armstrong; this source states his birthdate as 7 July 1881 but his “age at last birthday” as 20, which is contradictory, and gives his year of immigration as 1895 and his annual income as $300.[73]
        Julian Lubiniecki is enumerated in the 1906 census at section 24, in township 23, range 21 west of the Principal Meridian, with livestock consisting of 2 milk-cows, 6 other head of cattle, and no horses, sheep, or hogs, and his year of immigration to Canada (as previously stated) given as 1897.[74] On 19 March 1909 he was patented the 160 acres forming the northwest quarter of this same land.[75] But by August 1920 he and his wife were living on 9th Avenue S.W., Dauphin.[76] According to Harvest of Memories, “Julian farmed for a while and worked as a carpenter, at times for as little as one dollar a day. He spoke five languages and often acted as an interpreter and teacher for other immigrants in the area. After Julian’s marriage to Katherine Demchuk, they moved to Sturgis around 1930, where Julian built and set up the first Red and White Store in town (where the former Sturgis Bookstore is located). Apparently he loved carpentry more than running the store. After Katherine died in 1945, Julian moved to Regina. He continued working as a carpenter.” See further under Lubiniecki for them and their seven children.
  3. Mariya Demchuk, born 9 December 1891 in house no. 184, Tsyhany, baptized the same day in the Greek Catholic church as a child of “Basilius, Theodori Demczuk et Mariae” and “Antonina, Martini Warowy et Mariae,” with godfather Joannes Panagabko,[77] died 27 May 1967 at Makinak, Manitoba, aged over 75 years.[78] A number of sources report her birthdate or age erroneously.[79] She is found as a child in her parents’ household in the 1906 census. As “Maria Demczuk” she married 18 November 1907 at Sifton,[80] Michael Buyar, born ca. 1886 at Tsyhany aforesaid, died 27 April 1954, aged 68 years, who was brought from Tsyhany to Sifton in 1897 by his parents, Ivan (“John”) Buyar and Eudokia (“Dora”) ____.[81] The surname was originally Bujar, and is so spelled in the marriage record. Michael Buyar’s death notice reads, in part: “Mr. Buyar was born in Austria and received his education there. He came to Canada in 1897 to Dauphin and in 1907 he married Mary Denchuk [sic] at Sifton and they moved to Kamsack. In 1910 they moved to Ethelbert where they lived until 1943 when they moved to Bowsman. A year later they moved to Sifton where they resided until 1952 when they moved to Dauphin. Surviving besides his wife are two sons, Victor, of Breton, Alta.; Anthony, of Fort Frances, Ont.; five daughters, Mrs. Roy Pelechaty, of Stenin, Sask.; Mrs. Jack Wilman, of Ingelow; Mrs. Roy Gustafson, of Chater; Mrs. Dan Didyk, of Dauphin; Mrs. Michael Hlady, of Garland; two brothers, Nick, of Ethelbert; Pete, of Peace River, Alta.; and three sisters, Mrs. Mary Symchych, of Dauphin; Mrs. Nellie Syrnyk, of Edmonton; Mrs. Anne Yaschyshyn, of Swan River.” Mary’s death notice reads, in part: “Mrs. Mary Buyar, aged 75 years, of Makinak, formerly of Dauphin, passed away in the Ste. Rose du Lac hospital on Saturday, May 27. Funeral services were held from the Dauphin Ukrainian Catholic church of the Resurrection on Tuesday, May 30 with Very Rev. Dean G. Oucharyk officiating. Pallbearers were Paul Yaschyshyn, Randolph Gustafson, Nick Kereliuk, Ernie Hlady, Ed Frykas and Ed Pelechaty. Interment took place in Riverside cemetery…. Mary Demchuk was born in the Western Ukraine, coming to Canada to Sifton in 1897 with her parents, where she was educated. She Michael Buyar at Sifton in 1907, then resided at Kamsack for the next three years, when they returned to Manitoba and farmed from 1911 to 1945 when they moved into Sifton. In 1952 they retired to reside in Dauphin. Her husband predeceased her in 1954. In the fall of 1966 she went to Makinak to be with her daughter. She is survived by two sons and five daughters: Victor, of Breton, Alta.; Anthony, of Fort Frances, Ont.; Mrs. Roy Pelechaty (Lena), Saskatoon, Sask.; Mrs. Nellie Wilman, of Portage la Prairie; Mrs. Roy Gustafson, Pilot Mound; Mrs. Olga Didyk, of Makinak; Mrs. Michael Hlady (Lydia), of Garland; there are 19 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Also surviving are three brothers and three sisters, Alex, Thomas and Anthony at Sifton; Mrs. Pauline Trush, Mrs. Helen Yarema, of Dauphin; and William Blahitka (Tella), of Detroit, Michigan.” Issue:
    1. Lena Buyar, born 29 September 1911 at Ethelbert, Manitoba, died 3 August 1997 at the Dauphin Regional Health Centre; married 1931 at Ethelbert, Roman (“Roy”) Pelechaty. Her death notice reads, in part: “At the Dauphin Regional Health Centre, on Sunday, August 3, 1997. Lena Pelechaty of Dauphin, Manitoba, passed away at the age of 85 years. She was predeceased by her husband Roman (Roy) April 26, 1974; her parents Michael and Mary (Demchuk) Buyar; one brother Victor Buyar; and sisters Natalie Gustafson and Jennie Buyar. She leaves … one son Ed and wife Grace of Childs Lake, MB; daughter Edith and husband Len Pfeifer of Saskatoon, SK; five grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren; one brother Anton Buyar of Vernon, B.C.; three sisters Nellie Wilman of Portage la Prairie, MB, Olga Didyk of Dauphin, MB and Lydia Hlady of Ethelbert, MB. Lena was born on September 29, 1911 at Ethelbert, MB, where she received her education. Following her marriage to Roman (Roy) Pelechaty in 1931 at Ethelbert, they farmed in the Garland district until 1945. They then moved to Stenen, SK where they operated a general store. In 1966 they retired and moved to reside at Saskatoon. SK. In 1996 Lena moved to Dauphin and resided at the Happy Haven Home until the time of her passing. Lena was a member of SS. Peter and Paul Ukrainian Catholic Women’s League in Saskatoon, a member of Dauphin Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Resurrection and a member of Dauphin Ukrainian Catholic Women’s League. … Funeral service was held on Monday, August 11, 1997 at 10:00 a.m. from the Dauphin Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Resurrection, officiated by Rt. Rev. Msgr. Michael Buyachok and Nick Kereliuk serving as cantor. Interment followed in the Dauphin Riverside Cemetery. Pallbearers were Andy Seniuk, Ed Frykas, Ivan Synkiw, Vernon Los, David Didyk and Ernie Hlady.” [82] Issue (order uncertain):
      1. Ed Pelechaty, married Grace ____. They were of of Childs Lake, Manitoba, in 1997.
      2. Edith Pelechaty, married Len Pfeifer. They were of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, in 1997.
    2. Jeanie Buyar, born 1909, died unmarried 1930.
    3. Victor Buyar, died before 3 August 1997 as he predeceased his sister Lena.
    4. Nellie Anastasia Buyar, born 24 December 1919 near Ethelbert, died 13 December 2001 at Portage le Prairie, Manitoba. She married 1949, John Thomas Wilman, died 1966. Her death notice reads, in part: “On Thursday, December 13, 2001 at her residence, Nellie Anastasia Wilman of Portage la Prairie, widow of the late John Thomas Wilman, mother of Frank, Robert and Margaret, passed away at the age of 81 years. Born December 24, 1919 near Ethelbert, MB. Predeceased by her husband John (Jack) Wilman in 1966; her parents, Michael and Mary Buyar; her sisters, Jean, Natalie Gustafson and Lena Pelechaty; and brother Victor. She leaves to mourn her children, Frank and wife Susanne, Robert and wife Michelle, and Margaret and husband Douglas Wasyliw; eight grandchildren; and sisters, Olga Didyk of Dauphin, Lydia Hlady of Ethelbert; brother Tony and wife Ann of Vernon, BC; and brother-in-law Roy Gustafson of Pilot Mound, MB. Nell was raised on her family’s farm in Ethelbert, completed high school and came to Winnipeg to work as a maid. She entered the Manitoba Hospital Training School for Nurses in Selkirk…, graduating as what was then called a ‘mental nurse’ in 1944. Nell then joined the Canadian Women’s Army Corp in September 1944 where she performed duties picking up troops, transporting them to their bases, and translating from Ukrainian to English. She was discharged upon demobilization in November 1945. She returned to nursing at Selkirk until her marriage to Jack in 1949. Nell and Jack lived in Winnipeg where she obtained her certification as a Licensed Practical Nurse in 1950. Nell and Jack decided to operate the Wilman family farm at Erikson, MB. Son Frank was born in 1952, followed by Robert in 1954 and Margaret in 1956. In 1958, they decided to leave farming to pursue running various businesses and Nell continued nursing in Portage la Prairie. She nursed at The Manitoba Developmental Centre for twenty years until her retirement in 1986. … Funeral services will be held at The First Unitarian-Universalist Church on Wednesday at 10:00 a.m. Internment will follow at Hillside Cemetery in Portage la Prairie at 2:30 p.m.”[83] Issue:
      1. Frank Wilman, born 1952; married Susanne ____.
      2. Robert Wilman, born 1954; married Michelle ____.
      3. Margaret Wilman, born 1956; married Douglas Wasyliw.
    5. Anton (“Tony”) Buyar, of Vernon, B.C., in 1997 and in 2001; married Ann ____.
    6. Natalie Buyar, died before 3 August 1997 as he predeceased his sister Lena; married Roy Gustafson, of Pilot Mound in 2001.
    7. Olga Buyar, born 1924-25 (by calculation), died 15 August 2011 at St. Paul’s Care Home in Dauphin, aged 86 years. Olga (Buyar) Trush, died 2011 She married 1 July 1950 in St. Joseph’s Ukrainian Catholic church, Sifton, Dmetro Didyk, son of Alex Didyk, of Cowan, Manitoba. The newspaper announcement of their wedding noted that the bridesmaids included the bride’s cousin, Miss Zenia Demchuk of Sifton, and announced the newlyweds’ intention of residing at Glenella, Manitoba.[84] Her death notice reads, in part: “Peacefully on Monday, August 15, 2011 at St. Paul’s Care Home in Dauphin, with her son David at her side, Olga passed away at the age of 86 years. Olga is survived by her children: Dennis (Penny) and their children, Daryn, Tamara and Cody of Port Coquitlam, BC, Kenneth (Iris) and their children, Dale, Karley and James of Portage La Prairie, MB, David of Dauphin, MB. Also surviving is her sister Lydia Hlady of Dauphin, MB as well as numerous nieces, nephews, extended family members and friends. Rosary will be held on Sunday, August 21, 2011 at 6:30 p.m. with Prayers to follow at 7:00 p.m. from the Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Resurrection in Dauphin. Funeral Service will be held on Monday, August 22, 2011 at 10:30 a.m. from the Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Resurrection. Interment will follow in the Dauphin Riverside Cemetery.”[85] Issue:
      1. Denys Didyk, of Port Coquitlam, B.C., in 2001; married Penny ____. Issue: Daryn, Tamara, Cody.
      2. Kenneth Didyk, of Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, in 2001; married Iris ____. Issue: Dale, Karley, James.
      3. David Didyk, of Dauphin in 2001.
    8. Lydia Buyar, alive on 13 December 2001; married ____ Hlady. They were of Ethelbert, Manitoba, in 1997.
  4. 6Oleksandr (“Alex”) Demchuk, born in Galicia, probably in 1893.
  5. Hnat (“Nathaniel”) Demchuk, born 30 November 1895 in Galicia (according to he 1901 census), although he is said to have been aged only 1 year at the family’s passage in July 1898, and only 9 years of age at the taking of the census in June 1906, died in the lifetimes of his parents, unmarried and intestate, 26 June 1924 at Ethelbert General Hospital,[86] and buried in St. Josaphat’s Ukrainian Catholic Cemetery, Sifton. Kaye says, “The youngest [European-born] son, Hnat (Nathananiel), born 1896 in Tsyhany, was one year old on arrival in Canada; educated in Canada, became a school teacher.” His estate, valued at $682.68, was administered by his father.[87]
  6. Paulina Demchuk, born at Sifton, Manitoba, probably in 1899,[88] living at Sifton in 1963, 1989, and 1991 (when she is mentioned in death notices of family members). She is found in the household of her parents in 1911. She married 23 November 1919 at Dauphin,[89] Michael Trush, born 24 July 1893 at Zembalie, Trembowla, Austria (now in the Ternopil province of Ukraine), died 3 September 1955 at Dauphin General Hospital, aged over 62 years,[90] and buried in the new part of St. Josaphat’s parish cemetery, Sifton,[91] son of Nestor Trusz (Нестор Труш) and Anna Kubiw. His death notice reads, in part: “Born and educated in Austria, Mr. Trush came to Canada in 1905 to Valley River. He moved to Sifton in 1927, where he resided since that time.” See photographs for this family below, kindly supplied by great-granddaughter Carrie (Dyck) Campbell. Issue (order uncertain):
    1. Donald Trush, of Sifton, born there 31 October 1934, died 3 April 2013, and buried in the Dauphin Riverside Cemetery. He served as a pallbearer at the 1989 funeral of Anthony Demchuk. He married 5 August 1961, Evelyn Medwedchuk, who survived him. Donald Trush (1934-2013) His death notice reads, in part: “After a lengthy battle with cancers, Bohdan (‘Donald’) Trush passed away at the Dauphin Regional Health Centre on April 3rd, 2013 at the age of 78 years. Donald was born at Sifton, MB on October 31, 1934 to Pauline née Demchuk and Michael Trush. While raised on the family farm, he attended the Oukraina School where he received some of his education. With the passing of his father at an early age, he was forced to take over the family farm. Even through the turbulent and difficult times Donald was consistently optimistic…. On August 5, 1961 Donald married Evelyn Medwedchuk in the St. Josaphat’s Ukrainian Catholic Church in Sifton. Together with his wife they continued to farm in the Sifton area and raised four children. Donald enjoyed his mixed farm. Horses were one of his favorites on the farm…. Donald was predeceased by an infant daughter Lily, infant son Christopher, parents Michael and Pauline (née Demchuk) Trush, brothers Ernie Trush, Marvin Trush, sisters Mary Frykas, Emily and [her husband] Walter Shumka, Leona and [her husband] Leonard Frykas, brothers-in-law Harry Bobrowski and William Puchailo. Donald is survived by his wife of 51 years, Evelyn of Dauphin, children Ivy and husband Henrik Langer of Dauphin, Joyce Gibson of Neepawa, David and Cheryl Trush of Sifton, Gregory and wife Kim of Dauphin, granddaughters Jessica and Hayley Gibson of Neepawa, grandsons Alexander Trush of Brandon and Jeremy Trush of Sifton, sisters Hazel Puchailo of Gilbert Plains, Elizabeth Bobrowski of Thunder Bay, Phyllis and husband Mike Pizunski of Sifton, brother Teddy and wife Alice Trush of Thunder Bay, sister in law Alma Trush of Thunder Bay, brother in law Arthur Frykas of Dauphin. Many nieces, nephews and extended families. Prayers were offered on Wednesday, April 10, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. from the Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Resurrection in Dauphin. Funeral Liturgy was held on Thursday, April 11, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. from the Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Resurrection, celebrated by the Very Rev. Fr. Oleg Bodnarski. Marvin Procyshyn served as Cantor. Epistle Reader was Jessica Gibson and Crossbearer was Ivy Langer. Interment followed in the Dauphin Riverside Cemetery. Laying Donald to rest were active pallbearers William Trush, Ernest Trush, Michael Trush, Alexander Trush, Jeremy Trush and Gregory Trush. Honorary Pallbearers were Matt Burdeniuk, Bill Hrushka, Arthur Frykas, Lawrence Jacobson, Doug Fair and Victor Letendre.”[92]
    2. Ted Trush, alive on 3 April 2013; of Sifton in 1955; married Alice ____.
    3. Phylis Trush, alive on 3 April 2013; married Mike Pazunski or Pizunski, alive on 3 April 2013. They were of Sifton in 2013.
    4. Ernie Trush, died before 1 December 2005; of Sifton in 1955; married Mary ____.
    5. Marvin Trush, died before 1 December 2005; of Port Arthur, Ontario, on the death of his father in 1955; married Alma ____, alive on 3 April 2013.
    6. Mary Trush, died before 1 December 2005; married Arthur Frykas, alive on 3 April 2013, brother of Leonard Frykas below, and son of Harry and Mary (____) Frykas, of Mink Creek.
    7. Antoinette Hazel Trush, alive in 2013; married Wasyl (“William”) Puchailo, born 1916, died 2001, son of Stephen Puchajlo and Anne Komishin/Chomyszyn. They were of Grandview, Manitoba, on the death of her father in 1955. Issue:
      1. Florence Puchailo.
      2. Syd Puchailo.
      3. Gladys Audrey Puchailo, born 1957. She married before 1981, Arthur Richard Dyck, born 1944, son of Jacob Dyck and Elizabeth Jansen. They are the parents of:
        1. Carrie Elizabeth Antoinette Dyck, born 15 April 1981 at Dauphin, Manitoba. She married Allan Campbell. She is the contributor of the information on this branch of the family.
    8. Emily Trush, born 28 October 1922 in the Rural Municipality of Dauphin, died 1 December 2005 at the Gilbert Plains Personal Care Home, and buried in the Gilbert Plains Chatsworth Cemetery.[93] She married 14 November 19242 at Sifton, Walter Shumka, died 1998. Her death notice reads, in part: “She received her education at the Oukraina District School. On November 14th, 1942 at Sifton, Manitoba Emily married Walter Shumka and together they farmed in the Gilbert Plains area and raised three children. In 1985 they moved to the Town of Gilbert Plains. Emily loved her flowers and gardening and enjoyed bowling. She loved to go mushroom and berry picking. She was very eager to help her family and friends whether it was giving them her baking, driving people to different functions and events or providing everybody she knew with home made knitted dish cloths…. Emily was an active member of the Gilbert Plains Hospital Auxilliary, Rebecca Lodge, Gilbert Plains Drop In Centre, Roman Catholic Guardian Angels Parish and a member of the Ukrainian Catholic Sacred Heart Parish at Gilbert Plains. She was predeceased by her husband Walter in 1998, her father Mike Trush, mother Pauline Trush, sister Mary Frykas and brothers Ernie Trush and Marvin Trush, brothers-in-law William Puchailo and Harry Bobroski and son-in-law Gordon Kowalewich. She leaves to mourn her passing one daughter and two sons: Gayle and special friend Allan Nykolaishen of Yorkton, SK; Donnie and wife Connie of Ashville; Marvin and wife Betty of Gilbert Plains. Grandchildren Kurtis and special friend Naomi Duchak, Trent and special friend Hayley Weedon and Eric Shumka; Leanne Shumka and special friend Darryl Reilly; Vincent and Michelle Shumka and their children Chanel and Dylan; Martin and Heather Shumka and son Brenden; Steven and Paula Shumka and their children Dana, Courtney and Jake, Four sisters and two brothers, Leona Frykas and husband Leonard, Hazel Puchailo, Phyllis Pizunski and husband Mike, Elizabeth Bobroski, Donnie Trush and wife Evelyn, Ted Trush and wife Alice. Sisters-in-law Mary Trush and Alma Trush, brother-in-law Arthur Frykas. Many nieces, nephews and extended family.” Issue (order uncertain):
      1. Gayle Shumka, of Yorkton, Saskatchewan, at her mother’s death in 2005; married Gordon Kowalewich, died before 28 October 1922; later in a common-law relationship with Allan Nykolaishen.
      2. Donnie Shumka, of Ashville; married Connie ____.
      3. Marvin Shumka, of Gilbert Plains; married Betty ____.
    9. Leona Trush, alive on 12 February 2010; married 7 June 1947, Leonard Frykas, born 28 February 1921, died 12 February 2010, aged nearly 89 years, and buried in Chatsworth Cemetery,[94] brother of Arthur Frykas above, and son of Harry and Mary (____) Frykas, of Mink Creek. Her husband was of Gilbert Plains, Manitoba, at the time of his death. His death notice reads in part: “Dad and Mom lived on the family farm from 1947 to 1983 when they purchased a home in the Town of Gilbert Plains. Dad retired from farming in 1985. Dad served on various boards within the community as well as helping out on various community projects. He was a faithful member and attended mass regularly at the Sacred Heart Ukrainian Catholic Church.” he was survived by five children, seven grandchidlren, and six great-grandchildren. Issue, order uncertain:
      1. Nestor Frykas, of Dauphin, Manitoba; married Emily ____.
      2. Wayne Frykas, of Grandview, Manitoba; married Dawn ____.
      3. Lavina Frykas; married Don Luhowy, of Grandview.
      4. Shirley Frykas; married Glen Barkman of Gilbert Plains.
      5. Darlene Frykas; married David Syms, of Snow Lake, Manitoba.
    10. Elizabeth Trush, alive on 3 April 2013 (when she is mentioned in the death notice of her brother Donald); married Harry Bobrowski, died before 1 December 2005, of Fort William, Ontario, and later of Thunder Bay in 2013.
  7. Toma (“Tom”) Demchuk, of Sifton, born in October 1901 (per the 1911 census), died s.p. 5 June 1991, allegedly aged 87 years, and buried in the new section of St. Josaphat’s Ukrainian Catholic Cemetery, Sifton (the birthdate on his tombstone not quite agreeing with the age of death as reported in his death notices).[95] He is found in the household of his parents in 1911. He married (probably after 1924) Catherine Saramaga, born 1904, died s.p. 1 October 1987, who is buried beside him. Interviewed in the 1980s “at his home in the village of Sifton where he and Mrs. Demchuk (née Saramaga) retired,” he stated: “I worked hard in Fort William and later went to Chicago. After I got married, I went to Chicago for three winters to earn money to be able to get ahead. We did not get a homestead as in 1930 they were all gone but we bought a quarter [section] for $1,200, later adding 80 acres for which we paid $500; and when we left the farm [in 1939] we were only able to get $500 for the 80 acres in spite of all the hard work improving it. We have had a happy life in Sifton….”[96] A tribute to him by his niece, the local historian Elsie Lesyk, states that he came to Sifton in 1939, purchased Monita’s Livery business, and set up a trucking and draying operation. “He was active in the community in different capacities — helped build the Parish Hall, was one of the original founders of the Sifton Credit Union, and one of the original founders of the Co-op and the Sifton Community Center. Mr. Demchuk and his wife never had children, but his cupboards were always filled with goodies for children who may pass by.”[97] He was one of the founders of the Sifton Credit Union, and donated the land for St. Josaphat’s Ukrainian Catholic Parish Cemetery. He spent his last days at Golden Harbour in Sifton.
  8. 7Anthony (“Tony”) Demchuk, born 28 February 1905 at Sifton.[98]
  9. Natalie Demchuk, born 17 July 1908, died 3 June 1998 at Houston, Texas, aged over 89 years.[99] Natalie (Demchuk) Blahitka, 1908-1998 She is found as a child in the household of her parents in the 1911 census. She married by 1933, William Blahitka, born 20 Jan 1908, died in December 1984 at Fort Lauderdale, Florida, aged over 76 years.[100] They were living at Windsor, Ontario, in 1947, when their son Eugene went to Sifton to visit relatives and returned with her mother, Mrs. Antonina Demchuk.[101] In 1963 they were of Detroit, Michigan, and in 1989 and 1991 of Fort Lauderdale. Issue:
    1. Eugene William Michael Blahitka, born 3 October 1934 at Dauphin, died 18 July 2012 at Windsor, Ontario.[102] He married 9 October 1954 at Windsor, Ontario, Jeanne Olga, born 30 October 1934 at Windsor. Only child:
      1. William Blahitka, born 1958 at Windsor; married 12 Oct 1985 at Mississaga, Ontario, Mary Allen, who supplied the information here. Issue: Michael Blahitka; Shannon Blahitka.
    2. Martin Blahitka, born 1936, living at Marshall, Texas, in 2003. He married 1961 at Detroit, Michigan, Marsha Hobin, born 1940 at Anodarko, Oklahoma. Issue:
      1. Michael Blahitka, born 1965 at Detroit; married at Richardson, Texas, Kathy Campbell, born 1965 at Houston, Texas. Issue: Leeann Blahitka, born 1995 at Dallas, Texas; Lauren Blahitka, born 1997, also at Dallas.
      2. Marni Blahitka, born 1966 at Detroit; married 1998 at De Solo, Texas, David Hollingsworth, born 1966.
      3. Mark Blahitka, born 1968 at Dallas; married 1996 (?) at Fort Worth, Texas, Nickole Lestor, born 1968. Only child: Savanna Blahitka, born 1999 at Fort Worth.
    3. Gladys (“Sam”) Blahitka, born 27 September 1943 at Windsor, alive in 2003. She married (1), but subsequently divorced, David Cole. She married (2) David Patchett. She married (3) ____ Gershen. Issue:

      (by first husband:)

      1. Karen Cole.

      (by second husband:)

      1. David William Patchett.
  10. Helen Demchuk, born 10 May 1912 at Sclater, Manitoba,[103] living at Dauphin in 1963, 1989, and 1991 (when she is mentioned in the death notices of family members). She married 28 October 1933, William Danylishen, born 12 February 1906 at Valley River, Manitoba, died 1950. Issue:
    1. Florence Danylishen, born 27 February 1937 at Dauphin, alive in October 2002. She married 15 October 1955 at Grandview, Manitoba, William Bilawka, born 26 June 1933 at Rossburn, Manitoba, died 12 October 2002 while vacationing in Vancouver, British Columbia.[104] Issue:
      1. Ron Bilawka.
      2. Darren Bilawka.
      3. Kevin Bilawka.
      4. David Bilawka, married Jen ____. Issue; Eric Bilawka; Lauryn Bilawka.
      5. Karen Bilawka, married Ron Kelly.
    2. Joyce Danylishen, born 19 August 1938 at Grandview, living 2007, and now (2007) of Calgary. She married before 1963, Peter Bomak, born 1937-38 at Dauphin, died 26 May 2001 of cancer, aged 63 years, son of John Bomak and Nelle ____. His death notice reads, in part: “Peter was a fun loving person and achieved his goals in life through hard work and dedication. He was driven by endless devotion and love for his family. Peter will be remembered for his smile, courage, great sense of humour, strength and love by his loving wife Joyce [and] son Jason…. He was predeceased by his son Perry [and his] parents…. On Friday, June 1 a funeral mass was held at Holy Eucharist Catholic Church, officiated by Fr. Darren Kawiuk. Burial followed at Queen of Heaven Mausoleum, Assumption Cemetery.”[105] Issue:
      1. William Perry Bomak, of Winnipeg, born 13 September 1963 at Neepawa, Manitoba, died unmarried in 1995. He was employed by the University of Manitoba Library.
      2. Jason Bomak. He is married with one child and currently (2007) residing at Calgary.
    3. Shirley Danylishen, born 31 December 1942 at Grandview; married Brian Mikich. Issue:
      1. Kristin Mikich.
      2. Alison Mikich.
    4. Jimmie Danylishen, born 7 July 1944.
Hazel Trush Bill and Hazel (Trush) Puchailo
Hazel Trush, daughter of Michael Trush and Paulina Demchuk Hazel Trush and her husband, Bill Puchailo
Florence, Syd, and Gladys Puchailo Ted Trush visiting the grave of his grandfather, Nestor Trusz
Three Puchailo siblings. From left: Syd, Florence holding Gladys Ted Trush visiting the grave of his grandfather, Nestor Trusz [Нестор Труш] (1860-1927) at Zalawie in 2008
All photographs supplied by Carrie (Dyck) Campbell
Click on thumbnails for larger images
William and Natlie (Demchuk) Blahitka and sons
William and Natlie (Demchuk) Blahitka and sons (back row): Martin (left) and Eugene (right)
Photograph supplied by Mary (Allen) Blahitka

5. Stefan (“Stephen”) Demchuk, son of Wasyl Demchuk and Antonia Warowy, was born 2 August 1884 (according to the 1901 census) or December 1886 (according to the 1911 census) in Galicia,[106] and died 1 July 1946 at Dauphin, “following a short illness,” allegedly aged 63 years.[107] He was still living unmarried with his parents at the taking of the census on 28 June 1906, but married probably about 1908, and certainly by 1911 (but we have not found a registration of the event), Mary Jean Kruk (or more correctly, Krukowna, as given in the birth registration of her daughter Anne), born 14 July 1887 at Oleszyce, Galizia, died 10 May 1947 at Dauphin,[108] daughter of Anton Kruk and his wife Sophia (Botociuch?), who came to Canada in 1907.[109] Stefan Demchuk and his wife are found in the household of his parents in the 1911 census. According to his death notice, “Mr. Demchuk … settled at Sifton, where he farmed until 1945, when he retired and moved to Dauphin.” An historian of the Kruk family writes, “According to Catherine Yakielashek, ‘My mother Mary married Steve Demchuk and farmed around Dauphin until moving to town in 1944. My mother Mary died in May of 1947 and my Dad July 1, 1946.’”[110] Mary is called “of Sifton” in the 1932 death notice of her mother, but “of Valley River” in the 1935 death notice of her father.[111] Stefan and Mary Demchuk are buried in Riverside Cemetery.
    It appears from the obituaries of Stefan and Mary (Kruk) Demchuk that two of their daughters married men named Yakielashek (or Jakielashek, as the name is written, somewhat inconsistently, in a few places; this surname is also found as Jakielaszek). One of these was Catherine Yakielashek, above-mentioned, but we do not know which of these men she married. One of these sisters would appear to have been the mother of Marvin Yakielashek, a pallbearer at the 1977 funeral of John Kruk, brother of Mary (Kruk) Demchuk.
    Issue (all alive in 1947; order uncertain):

  1. Tony Demchuk, of Dauphin, born 18 July 1912 at Sifton,[112] died 24 August 2004 at Dauphin, and buried in Dauphin Riverside Cemetery.[113] He married 3 July 1943 at Dauphin, Lena Korneluk, living 24 August 2004 (she survived her husband). According to his death notice,
    Following his education he farmed with his dad in the Sifton area. Later [he] moved to Chicago, and stayed with family that had moved from Sifton; while in Chicago he was employed at a canning factory. Later Tony returned to Sifton and got acquainted with Lena Korneluk and … they were united in marriage. They then moved to Valley River with his parents and continued to farm. Tony and his dad helped to build the Valley River SS. Vladimir and Olga Ukrainian Catholic Church, where he and his family were active members. In 1972 Tony sold the farm and the family moved to Dauphin, where he did carpentry work; he built several houses and sold them.
    At the time of his death he had 12 grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren. Issue (order uncertain), all except the first-named being alive at their father’s death:
    1. James Demchuk, died v.p. 1975.
    2. Don Demchuk, of Dauphin in 2004; married Betty ____.
    3. Andrew Demchuk, of Winnipeg in 2004; married Lorraine ____.
    4. Edward Demchuk, of Edmonton in 2004; married Liz ____.
    5. Gus Demchuk, of Dauphin in 2004; apparently unmarried.
    6. William Demchuk, of Stoney Plain, Alberta in 2004; apparently unmarried.
    7. Martha Demchuk, married Herman Dobslaw, of Winnipeg.
    8. Pat Demchuk, married (common-law) Don Kowaluk, of Spruce Grove.
  2. Anne Demchuk, born 9 August 1911 at Dauphin,[114] living 2004; married Mike Atamanchuk, of Dauphin Rural District in 1946-47, and of Dauphin in 2004.
  3. Catherine (“Cassis”) Demchuk, died by 2004. She married Mike Yakielashek, of Sifton in 1946-47.
  4. Jeanne Demchuk, died by 2004. She married Pete Yakimitski, of Sifton in 1946-47.
  5. Rose Demchuk, unmarried; living at Winnipeg in 1946-47 and at Toronto in 2004.
  6. Victoria Demchuk, living 2004; married after 1946, ____ Kubiew or Kubiw.
  7. Pauline Demchuk, living 2004; married Henry Winsa, of Hamilton, Ontario, in 1946-47 and 2004.
  8. Verna Demchuk, living 2004; married Steve Yakielashek, of Sifton in 1946-47, possibly the one of this name who served as a pallbearer at the 1972 funeral of Karol Kruk (brother of Mary Kruk).
  9. Helen Demchuk, died by 2004. She married ____ Mizibrocky.

6. Oleksandr (“Alex”) Demchuk, son of Wasyl Demchuk and Antonia Warowy, was born in Galicia, probably in 1893,[115] died 1968, and was buried in the new section of St. Josaphat’s Ukrainian Catholic Cemetery, Sifton. His name is given as “Ilash” on the ship manifest, and his age is given as 4, the same as for his sister Mariya, which is manifestly false. He is called “Yelko” in the 1901 census, and was still living unmarried with his parents in 1911. As “Ilko Demczuk” he married 14 February 1919 at Sifton,[116] Mary Szewczyk, from Valley River, Manitoba, born 1902, died 13 December 1986 at Dauphin, aged 84 years, and buried in St. Josaphat’s Ukrainian Catholic Cemetery,[117] daughter of Frank Szewczyk and Anne Tobaco [Anna Tabaka].[118] Alex Demchuk and his wife homesteaded in the Sifton district, living for some time in a house owned by his parents. For the Canadian Centennial of 1967 Alex Demchuk and his wife built the “Ukrainian Hut” at Sifton, which has since become a somewhat well-known tourist attraction. They retired in 1960 and moved into the village of Sifton. A photograph taken of them on their wedding day is printed in History of the R.M. of Dauphin, p. 83. His wife’s death notice states that she had 12 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren. Issue, all alive in 1986 (order uncertain):

  1. Elsie Demchuk, alive in 2002; married Harry Lesyk, of Sifton. Elsie Lesyk, of #1 - 34 3rd Ave. NW, Dauphin, MB R7N 1H6. As Elsie Lesyk, she is the author of Wings Over Dauphin: A History of a Forgotten Era, on Dauphin’s role in the Service Flying Training Schools during World War II, which won an award from the Manitoba Heritage Federation; Tramboula, Cross of Freedom, a history of the Ukrainian pioneers of Trembowla, Manitoba; and Sifton Then and Now: A Reminiscence of the Pioneer Era (1992), a history of Sifton, Manitoba.
  2. Zenia Demchuk, unmarried on 1 July 1950 when as “Miss Zenia Demchuk of Sifton” she served as a bridesmaid at the wedding of her cousin, Olga Buyar. She subsequently married John Cholka (or Chalka?), of Ethelbert.
  3. Verna Demchuk, died 1996; married 1946, Walter Hupalo, of Sifton, born 11 May 1920 at Sifton, died 21 February 2002 at the St. Paul’s Personal Care Home, and bried in Dauphin Riverside Cemetery,[119] son of John Hupalo and Mary Gayowski. Her husband’s death notice reads, in part: “Walter … and was united in marriage to Verna Demchuk in 1946, and together they farmed in the Sifton district until retiring in 1980. In 1993, they moved to Dauphin where they have since resided. Walter was a member of the Sifton Ukrainian Catholic Church, where he served as Elder. He was also trustee for one term with the Norton School District, Director with the Sifton Consumers Co-op for 15 years, and was President for one term, and a member of the Dauphin Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Resurrection …. Walter is survived by his sons: Lawrence Hupalo of Calgary, AB; Eugene Hupalo of Sifton, MB; Ivan and wife Valerie Hupalo of Dauphin, MB; Brian and wife Lori of Dauphin, MB; daughter Bernice and husband Leonard Wilgosh of Winnipeg, MB; … eight grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews.” Issue (order uncertain):
    1. Lawrence Hupalo, of Calgary, Aliberta.
    2. Eugene Hupalo, of Sifton, Manitoba.
    3. Ivan Hupalo, of Dauphin, Manitoba; married Valerie ____.
    4. Brian Hupalo, of Dauphin; married Lori ____.
    5. Bernice Hupalo; married Leonard Wilgosh, of Winnipeg.
  4. Sylvester Demchuk, of Sifton in 1986; married Rosalie ____.

7. Anthony (“Tony”) Demchuk, son of Wasyl Demchuk and Antonia Warowy, was born 28 February 1905 at Sifton, died 30 August 1989 at Dauphin General Hospital, aged 83 [actually 84] years, and was buried beside his wife in the new section of St. Josaphat’s Ukrainian Catholic Cemetery, Sifton.[120] He is found as a child in the household of his parents in the 1911 census. He married 1938 at Ethelbert, Annie Kuba, born 1909, died 1982. They farmed in the Sifton district, and he is said to be of Sifton in his mother’s 1963 death notice. He retired from farming in 1985 and spent his last days in the Golden Harbour Senior Citizens Home, Sifton. His death notice states that he was survived by 4 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. Only child:

  1. Sylvia Demchuk, living 1989; married Victor Letendre, of Churchill, Manitoba, alive in April 2013 (when he served as a pallbearer at the funeral of his wife’s cousin Donald Trush), son of Henry and Ada (____) Letendre. They had four children, of whom we know the names of only two (order uncertain):
    1. Kelly Letendre (male), died 1969.
    2. Melanie Letendre; married before 2000, Henry Clyke, son of Gerald and Lillian (____) Clyke of Sudbury, Ontario. They were living in Winnipeg in 2001. They have at least two sons, James Victor (2001) and Quentin Henry (2003).


Notes

1Demetrius P. Demchuk, The Demchuk Family, 1778-1910. An edition by the present compiler is available online at http://johnblythedobson.org/genealogy/documents/ Demchuk_history_edited.pdf [PDF]. For other versions see the links at the end of this page.
2Vladimir J. Kaye, Dictionary of Ukrainian Canadian Biography [vol. 1] — Pioneer Settlers of Manitoba, 1891-1900 (Toronto, 1975), 18-19. There are some inconsistencies and misprints in the dates, and Kaye’s undocumented birthdate of 1859 for Wasyl Demchuk is not supported by the latter’s tombstone. Wasyl Demchuk, born 1834, who died 21 April 1926 in the municipality of Rockwood, near Selkirk, Manitoba (Manitoba death records, registration no. 1926-018247). We have not found a death notice for this man in the Selkirk Weekly Record of 22 or 29 April 1926.
3“Toma Demchuk of Ukraina,” in Michael Ewanchuk, Pioneer Settlers: Ukrainians in the Dauphin area, 1896-1926 (1988), 159-60. One well-documented Demchuk who was of this area, but whose filiations we do not know, is the following:
Anton Demchuk, born 3 June 1859 at Oleszyce, Galizien Kroenla, Austria, died 19 February 1935 at Sifton, Manitoba. He married 5 February 1882 at Oleszyce, Sophia Strilchuk, born 31 Aug 1861 at Oleszyce, died 8 December 1932 at Dauphin, Manitoba. Only known child: Catherine Anne (also known as Carolina) Demchuk, born 5 August 1897 at Oleszyce, died 27 July 1987 at Berkeley, Alameda Co., California. She married 14 November 1916 at Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, Hugh Joseph Davidson, born 10 April 1878 at Sutton, York Co., Ontario, died 14 November 1918 at Jasper, Alberta, and buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Edmonton, Alberta, son of Francis Davidson and Margaret Ann O’Leary. They had issue, for which, as well as the other information given here, see Janet A. Pollock, Anton Demchuk, available online at http://web.archive.org/web/20030701225825/ http://legacyfamilytree.com/Webs/pedigree/398.htm.
4Demetrius P. Demchuk, The Demchuk Family, 1778-1910, p. 11 of original.
5Catholic Church, Tsyhany, marriage register, from extracts supplied by Gary Duschl. The entry calls the bride Magdalena Panagabka, daughter of Petrus and Anna, and the groom Franciscus Bilinski, son of Vincentius and Anna, of Borszczow.
6Manitoba Probate Records, Dauphin Judicial District, estate file no. 1000, digital images available at FamilySearch.
7Probably the same Sylvester Demchuk who is mentioned as one of four people making a trip to Sifton to find ancestral homesteads; see Elsie Lesyk, Sifton Then and Now: A Reminiscence of the Pioneer Era (1992), 39.
8Kaye, Dictionary of Ukrainian Canadian Biography, 1:18, quotes Fred Demchuk’s 1946 death notice, which names his four surviving children but mentions no son Sylvester.
9Catholic Church, Tsyhany, burial register, from extracts supplied by Gary Duschl.
10Catholic Church, Tsyhany, burial register, from extracts supplied by Gary Duschl.
11Catholic Church, Tsyhany, burial register, from extracts supplied by Gary Duschl.
12Roman Catholic church, Tsyhany, burial register, from extract supplied by Gary Duschl.
13Greek Catholic church, Tsyhany, baptismal register, from extracts supplied by Chris Bostwick.
14Greek Catholic church, Tsyhany, baptismal register, from extracts supplied by Chris Bostwick.
15Roman Catholic church, Tsyhany, baptismal register, from extract supplied by Gary Duschl.
16Catholic Church, Tsyhany, burial register, from extracts supplied by Gary Duschl.
17Catholic Church, Tsyhany, marriage register, from extracts supplied by Gary Duschl.
18According to his son D. P. Demchuk.
19Catholic Church, Tsyhany, marriage register, from extracts supplied by Gary Duschl.
20Catholic Church, Tsyhany, baptismal register, from extracts supplied by Gary Duschl.
21Catholic Church, Tsyhany, baptismal register, from extracts supplied by Gary Duschl.
22We rely heavily here on the account of the son D. P. Demchuk, with additional details taken from the researches of Larry Hrehirchuk.
23Greek Catholic Church, Tsyhany, baptismal register, from extracts supplied by Chris Bostwick.
24Catholic Church, Tsyhany, marriage register, from extracts supplied by Gary Duschl.
25Greek Catholic Church, Tsyhany, baptismal register, from extracts supplied by Chris Bostwick.
26Catholic Church, Tsyhany, baptismal register, from extracts supplied by Gary Duschl.
27Death notice, Granview Exponent, 13 December 1978, p. 8, col. 5.
28Death notice, Granview Exponent, 4 January 1989, p. 8, cols. 2-3.
29Catholic Church, Tsyhany, burial register, from extracts supplied by Gary Duschl.
30See the entry for him in Kaye, Dictionary of Ukrainian Canadian Biography 1:18. The date of his death is from the notice in the Dauphin Herald and Press, 16 May 1946, p. 8, col. 4.
31The date of 1893 given in his death notice is clearly wrong.
32Information from Larry Hrehirchuk.
331916 Census of the Prairie Provinces, Manitoba, district 12 (Dauphin), Library and Archives Canada microfilm no. T-21926; p. 14. The entry reads, in part:
name  relationship  age  birthplace occupation
----------------------------------------------
Fred Demchuk*	head   55 Austria  farmer
Pallie Demchuk	wife   46 Austria
Nellie Demchuk	dau.   16 Manitoba
Nichola Demchuk	son    13 Manitoba
Annie Demchuk	dau.    8 Manitoba
Metro Demchuk	dau.**  5 Manitoba
-----
* Year of naturalization: 1904
** sic.
Parents' year of immigration 1898; religion of family: 
Greek Catholic; racial origin: Ruthenian
34Funeral program of Elizabeth (Demchuk) Zagrodney (1897-1990), from a copy supplied by Larry Hrehirchuk.
35We have been greatly helped here by the researches of Larry Hrehirchuk, a great-grandson.
36Greek Catholic church, Tsyhany, baptismal register, from extracts supplied by Chris Bostwick.
37Kaye, Dictionary, 1:18.
38Greek Catholic church, Tsyhany, baptismal register, from extracts supplied by Chris Bostwick.
39Funeral program of Elizabeth (Demchuk) Zagrodney (1897-1990), from a copy supplied by Larry Hrehirchuk.
40Funeral program of their son, Stanley Zagrodney (1922-1982), from a copy supplied by Larry Hrehirchuk.
41“Andrew Garlinski,” in Kaye, Dictionary, 1: 29.
42Birth registration of Mykola Demczuk, mother Paulina Krevetz, Manitoba birth registrations, no. 1904-007597, from index entry.
43In Memoriam card, from a copy kindly supplied ny Larry Hrehirchuk.
44Catholic Church, Tsyhany, baptismal register, from extracts supplied by Gary Duschl.
45Catholic Church, Tsyhany, marriage register, from extract supplied by Gary Duschl.
46Greek Catholic church, Tsyhany, baptismal register, from extracts supplied by Chris Bostwick.
47Greek Catholic church, Tsyhany, baptismal register, from extracts supplied by Chris Bostwick.
48Greek Catholic church, Tsyhany, baptismal register, from extracts supplied by Chris Bostwick.
49Greek Catholic church, Tsyhany, baptismal register, from extracts supplied by Chris Bostwick.
50Catholic Church, Tsyhany, burial register, from extracts supplied by Gary Duschl.
51Kaye, Dictionary of Ukrainian Canadian Biography, 1:18-19. Kaye’s undocumented birthdate of 1859 for Wasyl Demchuk is not supported by the latter’s tombstone.
52His age is given as 49 years in the 1906 census, supporting a birthdate of 1856-57.
53Death notice, Dauphin Herald and Press, 15 March 1934, p. 5, col. 5.
54Although this suggests a birthdate of ca. 1856-57, which is serious disagreement with his birthdate as reported in the 1900 census.
55Elsie Lesyk, Sifton Then and Now, p. 315.
56Catholic Church, Tsyhany, marriage register, from an extract kindly supplied by Gary Duschl. The marriage year of 1882 given in her death notice is incorrect.
57Her birthdate is given as 4 July 1865 in 1901 census but as October 1866 in the 1911 census; her age is given as 18 (implying a birthdate of 1865-66) in her marriage record, and as 39 (implying a birthdate of 1866-67) in the 1906 census; and her age at death of 94 years (see below) in 1963 would make her birth in 1868-69.
58Death notice, Dauphin Herald, 16 October 1963, p. 3, col. 4. Kaye (1:18), whose arithmetic is often not very exact, alludes to this death notice but cites the date incorrectly, and uses it as his source for a calculated birthdate for her and two different ages at death, all of which are wrong. Her age was understated in her death notice by several years if the birthdate reported for her in the 1901 census is correct.
59The names of Antonina’s parents are given in the 1889 baptismal record of her daughter Kateryna.
60“Julian and Kateryna (Demchuk) Lubiniecki,” in Harvest of Memories: Sturgis and District…, 1900-2000, by the Sturgis and District History Book Committee (Sturgis, Saskatchewan: the Committee, 2000), p. 518, where he is called “William Demchuk.” This work is available online at http://www.ourroots.ca/e/toc.asp?id=6123.
611901 Census of Canada, Province of Manitoba, District no. 9 (Marquette), Subdistrict g-7, p. 25, P.A.C. RG 31 [microfilm no. T-6434].
62Census of the Northwest Provinces, 1906, Province of Manitoba, district no. 2 (Dauphin), sub-district no. 22, p. 9, P.A.C. RG 31 [microfilm no. T-18354].
631911 Census of Canada, Manitoba, district 16 (Dauphin), subdistrict no. 43, p. 21. The entry reads:
                       born      age birthpl.
Demczuk, Wasyl     head   m December  1856 55 Galicia 1898 farmer
  "    , Antonina* wife   m October  1866 45 Galicia 1898
  "    , Steven    son    m December  1886 24 Galicia 1898 farmer's son
  "    , Mary  dau.-in-l. m November  1891 20 Galicia 1897
  "    , Alexander son    s September 1893 18 Galicia 1897
  "    , Thomas    son    s October  1901  9 Man.   
  "    , Paulina   dau.   s October  1898 12 Man.   
  "    , .......** son    s February  1905  6 Man.   
  "    , Natalka   dau.   s J...  1909  2 Man.
----------------
All ethnicities Ruthenian; all nationalities Canadian; family
members (including the daughter-in-law) who were born in Galicia
all have immigration date of 1904
 * sic
** This must be the son Anthony, but the name is almost completely
illegible
64According to Kaye.
65According to Kaye.
66Пропамятна Книга з Нагоди Золотого Ювілею Поселення Українського Народу в Канаді [Commemoration of the Golden Jubilee of Ukrainian Settlement in Canada] (Yorkton, Saskatchewan, 1941), pp. 169-70, where his name is given as Василь Демчук.
67Dauphin Herald and Press, 28 August 1947, p. 11, col. 3..
68Tsyhany Greek Catholic Church, baptismal register, from an extract supplied by Chris and Mike Bostwick.
69Dauphin Herald & Press, 31 May 1945, p. 5, col. 4.
70Harvest of Memories: Sturgis and District…, 1900-2000, p. 518.
71The birthdate of 20 November 1887 reported for her in the 1901 census is erroneous, as is the age of 18 reported for her in the 1906 census, taken in June of that year (implying a birthdate of 1887-88), and the age of 5 years reported for her in the manifest of the ship on which her family arrived (implying a birthdate of 1892-93).
72Manitoba marriage registrations, no. 1904-003229.
731901 Census of Canada, Manitoba, district: Brandon, subdistrict: Morton, division i, subdivision 5, p. 1; PAC microfilm no. T-6431.
74Census of the Northwest Provinces, 1906, Province of Manitoba, district no. 2 (Dauphin), sub-district no. 13, p. 25, P.A.C. RG 31 [microfilm no. T-18354].
75Dominion Land Grants, National Archives of Canada, R.G. 15, liber 345, folio 234 (microfilm no. C-6210).
76Demetrius P. Demchuk, The Demchuk Family, 1778-1910, undated typescript. The author, who was first cousin to Julian Lubiniecki’s wife, mentions boarding with them at that time.
77Tsyhany Greek Catholic Church, baptismal register, from an extract supplied by Chris and Mike Bostwick.
78Death notice of Mrs. Mary Buyar, Dauphin Herald, 5 June 1967, p. 4, col. 8.
79These include the ship’s passenger list, giving her age as 4 years in July 1898, the 1901 census, giving her birthdate as 2 December 1890, and the 1901 census, reporting her age as 14.
80Manitoba marriage registrations, no. 1907-002124.
81Death notice of Michael Buyar, Dauphin Herald, 29 April 1954, p. 3, col. 3; Kaye, Dictionary of Ukrainian Canadian Biography, 1:12.
82Dauphin Herald, 19 August 1997, p. 19, col. 2.
83Winnipeg Free Press, 17 December 2001, p. C10, col. 2.
84Dauphin Herald and Press, 6 July 1950, p. 4, col. 4.
85Winnipeg Free Press, 20 August 2011, p. B11, col. 5.
86Manitoba death records, registration no. 1924-028246 (for date and town); Kaye (for precise location); in one place his probate file (see below) misstates the date as 27 June 1924.
87Manitoba Probate Records, Dauphin Judicial District, estate file no. 1000, digital images available at FamilySearch.
88Her birthdate is given as 13 October 1899 in her birth record, as Pauine Demchuk, Manitoba birth registrations, no. 1899-27630803, but this record has no contemporary authority as the registration was not made until 24 April 1989. The date is given as October 1898 in the 1911 census and as 8 February 1900 in the 1901 census.
89Manitoba marriage registrations, no. 1919-064025.
90Death notice, Dauphin Herald, 8 Sept, 1955, p. 4, col. 5, which misstates his age at death as “in his 67th year.”
91Elsie Lesyk, Sifton Then and Now, p. 317.
92Death notice, available online on the website of the funeral home, at http://www.sneathstrilchuk.com/donald-trush/; punctuation revised and minor cuts made for clarity.
93Death notice, Grandview Exponent, 13 December 2005, p. 10, cols. 1-3.
94Death notice, Grandview Exponent, 9 March 2010, p. 12, cols. 1-3.
95Two unidentified death notices, from the collection of Larry Hrehirchuk.
96“Toma Demchuk of Ukraina,” in Ewanchuk, Pioneer Settlers: Ukrainians in the Dauphin area, 1896-1926, 159-60.
97“Tom Demchuk, a one man industry,” in Lesyk, Sifton Then and Now, 58-60..
98Birth registration of Atanas Demczuk, mother Antonia Waroway, Manitoba birth registrations, no. 1905-24223798, from index entry. This brith was not registered until 25 March 1968.
99Social Security Death Index; the Obituary Daily Times at Rootsweb indexes two obituaries for her which we have not seen, one in the Fort Lauderdale Sun Sentinel of 7 June 1998, the other in the Houston Chonicle of 8 June 1998 (which states that she was from Dauphin, Manitoba).
100Social Security Death Index.
101Dauphin Herald and Press, 28 August 1947, p. 11, col. 3..
102Mary Blahitka, Sidney-Jackson Web Site at http://www.myheritage.com/.
103Date from birth registration of Helena Demczuk, mother Antonina Warowy, Manitoba birth registrations no. 1912-013510, from index entry.
104Death notice, Winnipeg Sun, 17 October 2002, from a copy supplied by Larry Hrehirchuk.
105Death notice, Winnipeg Free Press, 2 June 2001.
106His age is reported very inconsistently. He is said to have been aged 17 years at the family’s passage in July 1898, 20 in 1906, 24 in 1911, and 63 at his death in 1946.
107Dauphin Herald & Press, 4 July 1946, p. 8, col. 4.
108Dauphin Herald & Press, 15 May 1947, p. 4, col. 4.
109Family Group Sheet by Timothy Lyall Clarke, 2334 Western Ave., Waukegan, Illinois 60087, dated 22 March 1982, from a copy kindly provided by Larry Hrehirchuk (this source gives the name of Mary Kruk’s mother as Sophia Blotuk). Entry in LDS Pedigree Resource File, submitted by Jim Terry, 1220 S.W. Harrier Circle, Oak Harbor, Washington 98277; see also “Family Group Sheet Collection of James P. Terry,” archival copy available in the Internet Archive.
110“Family Group Sheet Collection of James P. Terry,” mentioned above.
111“Family Group Sheet Collection of James P. Terry,” mentioned above, citing obituaries published in the Dauphine Herald of 15 December 1932 and 21 February 1935.
112Date from birth registration of Tony Demchuk, mother Mary Kruk, Manitoba birth registrations no. 1912-11816255, from index entry.
113Death notice, Dauphin Herald, 7 September 2004, p. B5, cols. 1-2, from a copy kindly supplied by Larry Hrehirchuk.
114Birth registration of Anie Demczuk, mother Marie Krukowna, Manitoba birth registrations no. 1911-001568, from index entry.
115His age or birthdate is reported inconsistently, his age being given as 11 years (implying a birthdate of 1899-90) in the 1901 census, but his birthdate being given as 1 July 1891 in the 1901 census and as September 1893 in the 1911 census.
116Manitoba marriage registrations, no. 1919-010102.
117Death notice, Dauphin Herald, 23 December 1986, p. B7, cols. 3-4.
118See Kaye, Dictionary, 1:88, and the valuable first-hand account by Mary (Sewczyk) Demchuk, “My tribute to Trembowla,” printed in History of the R.M. of Dauphin (Dauphin, 1976), 82-86; also “Memorable Manitobans: Michael F. Szewczyk (1904-1999),” a profile of her brother, at http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/people/szewczyk_mf.shtml.
119Death notice, Dauphin Herald, 5 March 2002, p. B7, col. 1.
120Death notice, Dauphin Herald, 12 September 1989, p. C3, col. 1.


Some Sites of Related Interest

From the Genealogy Page of John Blythe Dobson
URL = johnblythedobson.org/genealogy/ff/Demchuk.cfm
This page first appeared 15 June 2001
Last revised 14 September 2017