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MAUL & MOULD

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The two immigrant Maul families to New York were founded by Johannes Maul (no. 4 below) and his nephew Johann Friedrich Maul (son of no. 3 below). It was correctly stated in a 1881 local history that “Germany was the original fatherland of the representatives of the Mould family.”[1] Their precise ancestral home, as revealed in Henry Z. Jones, Jr.’s magisterial Palatine Families of New York (1985), was the parish of Driedorf (about 9 kilometers southwest of Herborn), in the Province of Hessen, which Jones refers to as “a seedbed of emigrant families.”[2] The sixteenth of the unnumbered plates at the front of vol. I of that work shows a view of Driedorf.

Johannes Maul’s son, Christoffel Maul, eventually settled in Hanover Precinct (now Montgomery Tp.),[3] Ulster (now Orange) Co., N.Y. Jones, speaking of the tendency of the Palatine emigrants to move in groups, says, “No better example of this can be found than in the case of the German families who settled in Montgomery … and were members of the German Reformed ‘Brick’ Church there. Many emigrants direct from Germany began settling at Montgomery in the late 1720s, joining a few others who had come in 1710. These later-arriving families included the Buchstabers, Christs, Jungbloedts, Melsbachs, Ottos, and Sensebachs…. Nearly 95% of this group who arrived in America ca. 1726-1750 and then settled at Montgomery on the Wallkill originate within close proximity of each other in the Neuwied/Westerwald region of Germany.”[4] Of the families Jones mentions, at least three — the Jungbloedts, Melsbachs, and Sensebachs — were allied by marriage with the Maul family either directly, or through the Comfort family with which the Mauls had multiple connections.

Most of our material on the early generations of this family comes from Jones’s Palatine Families of New York, 1:600-6. Much of the data on the later generations is taken (sometimes accompanied by a warning) from Mackenzie’s Colonial Families of the United States,[5] This memoir is better than average for Mackenzie, and provides much material not readily available elsewhere. We must however protest the grandiose claims which its submitter, Wesley Wait (1861-1949), makes respecting his own carreer, of which more will be said below; and for our dependence upon of a work of such mediocre reputation we can only make the excuse that, apart from the brief Maul Appendix in the Bottings’ Comfort Families of America,[6] it is practically the only other account of the family in print apart from a few scattered notices of individual members. The search for secondary literature pertaining to the period after the family’s arrival in America is complicated by the difficulty of distinguishing it from various Maule, Moule, or Mould families of British origin. However, we have received much help from Ralph H. Weller, The Hieronimus Weller Family in America (Alcove, N.Y., 1999), and indeed, had we known of this work at an earlier stage of our own researches, we should certainly have avoided covering so much common ground. We have not seen The History and Genealogy of the William Bull and Sarah Wells Family of Orange County, New York (1974, with 1984 addendum), which it cites. Nor have we seen Wesley Logan Baker, Dickerson and Dickinson: Descendants of Philemon Dickerson of Southold, Long Island, N.Y.; also, Long Island Descendants of Captain John Dickinson of Oyster Bay (1978), 831 pp., which would appear to contain considerable material on the families we treat; we only learned of the existence of this work in 2009.

It is almost a certainty that all the nineteenth-century Moulds of Montgomery Tp. were of this family, but with the limited source materials presently available to us we have in several cases been unable to determine their affiliation (see the list of “Unplaced Presons” at the end of these notes). Some of these persons were clearly quite ignorant as to the details of their descent. One member of the family, Frank Mould, furnished for a biographical sketch published in 1895 the information that his great-grandfather, Johannes Mould, Jr. (our no. 9), was “born in Holland.”[7] But not only did the family’s origin have nothing whatever to do with the Netherlands, but their immigration to America has been assigned to the wrong generation, as they had already arrived before the birth of this man’s father. Although (as will appear below) the family did in fact sail from the Netherlands, probably the nineteenth-century writers who derive them from there were not even aware of this fact, but were simply guessing at a Dutch origin based on the spellings of the name used by Dutch clerks in the areas in New York where the family lived.[8]

Church records consulted in the preparation of these notes (but in some cases furnishing only a few relevant entries) include those for the following places:

  • Good Will: “[Records of the] Presbyterian Church at Good Will, Orange County, N.Y.,” as serialized in Jane Wethy Foley, Early Settlers of New York State, 9 vols. in 2 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1993).
  • Goshen: The early records of the First Presbyterian Church at Goshen, New York, from 1767 to 1885, comp. Charles C. Coleman (Goshen, 1934).
  • Kingston: Baptismal and Marriage registers of the Old Dutch Church at Kingston, Ulster County, New York, ed. Roswell Randall Hoes (1891).
  • Machackemeck: Minisink Valley [and Machackemeck and Walpeck] Dutch Church Records, ed. Royden Woodward Vosburgh (Collections of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, vol. 5, 1913).
  • Montgomery: Montgomery Reformed Dutch Church [Records], comp. Kenneth E. Hasbrouck, 2 vols., typescript (New Paltz, New York, n.d.). The marriage records for 1829-1858 are available online at http://www.rootsweb.com/~nyorange/dutch_01.htm.
  • Shawangunk: “Marriages of the Dutch Reformed Church of Shawangunk, Ulster County, New York [1789 to 1816],” transcribed by Kenneth E. Hasbrouck, New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 87 (1956): 31-36, 96-101, 160-165.
  • Wawarsing: Wawarsing [Ulster County] Reformed Dutch Church Records, ed. Royden Woodward Vosburgh (Collections of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, vol. 7, 1922).

I am deeply grateful to Susanne (Embler) Devine, of Tucson, Arizona, who collated my notes against Jean Worden’s edition of the Montgomery “Brick Church” records, sent numerous corrections from it and other sources, and supplied the very interesting chart of consanguineous marriages which appears below. Susan Hamby, editor of the Halifax County, North Carolina, Genealogical Society Newsletter, kindly brought a relevant item (cited below) to our attention. Jody (Pierson) Masterson sent material, including several photographs, on the families of Johannes Mould (1756-1813) and his son Christoffel Mould (1786-1813). Christine Emerson-Moulton supplied information on Wesley Wait and his wives. Pamela J. Sears made many valuable suggestions, particularly respecting the Miller connection.


consanguineous marriages in the Maul/Mould family

Note: Since this chart was drawn, six more consanguineous marriage have been discovered:

  • Alfred Weller (no. 4.iii.c.1.VII) and his third cousin, Catherine Dickerson (no. 5.i.d.7)
  • Levi Miller (no. 4.iii.b.3) and his first cousin once removed, Susannah Comfort
  • Johannes Miller Hunter (no. 5.iv.b.1) and his kinswoman Cecelia B. Bull
  • Christopher J. Mould (10.i) and his kinswoman Martha Bull
  • Anna Catharine Mould (no. 10.xii) and her kinsman Abner Bookstaver
  • Daniel Mould (no. 14) and his kinswoman, Letitia Bull

1.   Paulus(A) Maul,[9] of Driedorf, Hessen-Nassau, Prussia, born say 1625, died shortly before 2 April 1686, when he was buried. He married ____, Anna Engen, who died shortly before 18 September 1689, when she was buried.
    Known issue (order inferential):

  1. 2Johann Martin Maul, born say 1655.
  2. 3Johannes Maul, born say 1660.
  3. Anna Margareta Maul, “daughter of Paulus Maul in Driedorf,” was a sponsor at the baptism of one of her brother Johann Martin’s children in 1679.[10]
  4. Anna Juliana Maul, “daughter of the late Paulus Maul in Driedorf,” was a sponsor at the baptism of a child of her brother Johann Martin in 1687.[11] An Anna Julian Maul, single woman, was also a sponsor at the baptism of the eldest child of Johannes Maul (No. 4) in 1688.[12]

The following men were perhaps sons or nephews:

  1. Johann Jost Maul (place of residence not stated), a sponsor at the baptism of a child of Johann Martin Maul (No. 3) in 1675. A Johann Jost Maul “of Heiligenborn” (in the Rhineland Palatinate) was a sponsor at the baptism of a child of Johannes Maul (No. 3) in 1696.[13] Finally, Johann Jost Maul “of Driedorf,” died by 1709, was the deceased father of Johannes Maul, a sponsor at the baptism of a child of Johannes Maul (No. 3) in 1709.[14]
  2. Goerg Maul, a single man, of unstated parentage, a sponsor at the baptism of a child of Johann Martin Maul (No. 3) in 1682.[15] In 1698, an “Ursula, widow of Goerg Maul in Driedorf,” was sponsor at the baptism of a daughter of Johannes Maul (No. 3).[16]

2.   Johann Martin Maul,[17] of Heiligenborn, son of Paulus Maul and Anna Engen, was born say 1655, and died shortly before 2 June 1697, when he was buried. He married 31 January 1671 (but where?), Anna Catharina Posthen, living May 1687, daughter of the late Heinrich Posthen, of Heiligenborn, by his wife Anna ____.
    They had at least seven children baptized at Driedorf between 1672 and 1687. Jones has made a persuasive case that the unnamed child baptized on 1 May 1687 was named Julianna, and became the wife of the immigrant Heinrich Reuter.[18] However, only the following two sons can be identified with complete certainty:[19]

  1. Jost Heinrich Maul, probably the unnamed child of his father who was baptized 14 April 1672 (but where?). He married 19 February 1692, Ann Margareta Heinrich, daughter of Johannes Heinrich. As “Ann Margret wife of Jost Henrich Maul at Heiligenborn” she served on 10 April 1692 as baptismal sponsor to a child of her husband’s uncle Johannes Maul (no. 4 below).
  2. Johann Friedrich Maul, born ca. 1679,[20] and almost surely the unnamed child of his father who was baptized 6 April 1679, living 1742. He married 7 November 1699, Ann Ursula Friess, born ca. 1679,[21] living 1742, daughter of Jacob Friess, of Gusternhain, a village in the parish of Driedorf. They petitioned to emigrate from Heiligenborn in 1709, and they and their two children, along with a John Paul Maul, orphan, were in the sixth party of Palatines to leave Holland that year. They settled first, by 1710, at New York City.[22] Baptisms of their children appear during 1712 to 1718 in registers of the West Camp Lutheran Church. About 1717 they were at “Beckmansland” (i.e. Beekman’s Patent, in Dutchess County, New York). A child of theirs was baptized in the Kingston Dutch Church in 1722,[23] and they served as sponsors there in 1727,[24] In 1742 they were sponsors at Red Hook Lutheran Church.[25] A few additional particulars are given in Even More Palatine Families.[26] His descendants are traced down to his grandchildren in PFNY 1:601-3, and one line (descended from his son Johannes) which settled in Ghent, Columbia Co., N.Y., and spelled their name Moul, is brought further forward in Cuyler Reynolds, Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs (1911), 1372-3 (where however his son Johannes, aforesaid, is erroneously called Jacob).

3.   Johannes1 Maul,[27] of Hohenroth near Driedorf, later of New York, son of Paulus Maul and Anna Engen, was born say 1660, and died in the State of New York between 4 October 1710 and 24 June 1711.[28] He married (1) 9 February 1687 at Hohenroth, Anna Juliana Theiss, who died shortly before 21 April 1693, when she was buried at Hohenroth, daughter of Nicolaus Theiss, of Hohenroth, by the latter’s wife ________.[29] He married (2) 28 November 1693, Anna Elisabeth Drisch, born 1668 (aged 42 years in 1710), living 1716, daughter of Johann George Drisch, of Hohenroth, by the latter’s wife Anna Ursula ____.
    Johannes Maul, his second wife, and seven surviving children were among the sixth party of Palatines to leave Holland in 1709.[30] The first record of his family in America is on the Hunter provisioning list of 4 July 1710, by which time he had only six children still alive. He himself survived the voyage less than a year. His widow and her daughters were living in New York City by 1710.[31] She joined the New York Dutch Church on 26 February 1712,[32] and was still living in the city in 1716.
    Known issue, all baptisms at Driedorf:[33]

(by first wife)

  1. 4Christoffel Maul, baptized 15 January 1688 with sponsors Christoffel Theiss, “single man,” and Anna Julian Maul, “also single.”
  2. A child, baptized 29 May 1690 with sponsors Barb[ara] wife of Johannes Göbels, Gorg Theiss single man, and Ann Kath[arina] wife of Johannes Stahl at Mademühlen; died young.
  3. A child, baptized 10 April 1692 with sponsors Johann Christ. Theiss at Driedorf, Johann Thonges son of Claus the Hainberger at Rabenscheid, and Ann Margret wife of Jost Henrich Maul at Heiligenborn; died young.

(by second wife)

  1. Anna Ursula Maul, clearly the unnamed child baptized 2 November 1694 with sponsors Anna Katharina wife of Heinrich ____ at Rabenscheid, John Christ. Betz at Hohroth, Johann Henrich Drisch, single man, and Elsbeth, unmarried daughter of Johann Jost Best at Mademühlen. She married 1 October 1724 in the New York Dutch Church,[34] Nicolaus Seyn,[35] probably the man of this name who died testate between 7 November 1778 and 19 September 1781. She joined the church on 31 May 1715, but does not appear to have baptized any children there. Her husband, who was likewise a Palatine immigrant, was naturalized 8 July 1730. Between 1733 and 1742 he was in Hunterdon Co., New Jersey. In 1748 he purchased land in Amwell Tp., Hunterdon Co. We have found no record of any children.
  2. A child, baptized 10 May 1696 with sponsors Engel daughter of Johann Driesch, Anna Catharin daughter of the Posth. (?), and Johann Jost Maul at Heiligenborn; died young.
  3. Anna Catharina Maul,[36] born ca. 1697, clearly the unnamed child baptized 24 January 1698 with sponsors Ursell wife of Görg Maul in Driedorf, Anna Kath[arina] wife of Johann Tönges Sahm at Hohroth, and Peter Driesch, single man; living 24 September 1750 (when she was still advertising her book-seller’s business).[37] She married (as his second wife) 11 September 1722 in the New York Dutch Church,[38] Johann Peter Zenger,[39] the famous printer, born ca. 1697, died 28 July 1746 at New York City, son of the late Nicolaus Eberhardt Zenger, schoolmaster, a Palatine immigrant from Rumbach who died on the voyage, by his wife Johanna Wagner.
        Anna Catharina Maul joined the New York Dutch Church on 19 February 1718. Her husband was made a freeman of New York City on 10 September 1723, joined the church the same year, and was naturalized 15 March 1739. Information on his activities as the printer of the New-York Weekly Journal, and on his famous freedom-of-the-press trial, is too well known to require repetition here.
        Johann Peter Zenger died intestate, and letters of administration on his estate were issued 18 September 1746. His widow Catherine (as she consistently called herself in latter life[40]) carried on the printing business with the help of her son John.[41] While she was obviously a capable woman, she was certainly not the “first woman printer in America,” as has been extravagantly claimed,[42] nor can she reasonably be credited with the carreer ascribed to her in the sensationalistic 1946 novel Anna Zenger, Mother of Freedom, by Kent Cooper.[43] The matter was gone into in great detail by the noted Zenger scholar Vincent Buranelli, whose 1956 article in the William and Mary Quarterly[44] proved that Cooper’s work was not factually based, but concluded, “This does not derogate from Anna Zenger’s legitimate place in the older authorities…. We know from Peter Zenger’s famous Apology how his wife would appear outside his cell with his helpers in tow, and how he would give her instructions “through the Hole of the Door of the Prison’; whereupon she would go back to the shop and supervise the publication of the paper. Anna was the real publisher of the Journal for these months.” Ann Zenger carried on its publication from her husband’s death until December 1748, then turned the work over to her son John, who continued it until his early death in 1751, when it ceased.
        Issue, all baptisms in the New York Dutch Church:[45]
    1. Johannes (“John”) Zenger, baptized 1 November 1723,[46] died 22 June 1751, a death notice appearing two days later stating, “Last Tuesday Evening departed this life, in the Twenty Eighth Year of his Age, Mr. John Zenger, Printer and Publisher of the New-York Weekly Journal.”[47] He married 1741, Anneke Lynssen. Their only known children, Jannetje, baptized 28 November 1744,[48] and Catharina, baptized 30 August 1749,[49] are believed to have died young.
    2. Peter Zenger, baptized 22 September 1725.[50] He married 26 October 1751 in the New York Dutch Church,[51] Brechje de la Montanye,[52] born 1723, baptized 1 May 1723 in the New York Dutch Church,[53] daughter of Teunis de la Montanye (or Montagne), of Harlem, by his wife Geesje Bussing. No known issue.
    3. Nicolaus Zenger, baptized 24 September 1727,[54] probably died young.
    4. Elisabetha Zenger, baptized 2 July 1729,[55] She married 6 July 1745 in the New York Dutch Church,[56] John George Koek or Koch (“Kook” in the marriage record), who was probably born in the Netherlands. According to the researches of Henry Z. Jones, in 1744, “A reward was offered by John George Koch, stockingweaver, at his lodgings in the house of Peter Zenger in New York City, for the return of a Swiss runaway…. John George Cook was naturalized 6 December 1746… [and] made a freeman of New York City 26 September 1748 as a stocking-weaver.”[57] Three years later, “John George Cook, of New York City, stocking-weaver,” applied on 3 April 1751 for guardianship of Anna Roseanna Clausen (also called Anna Rosena Claus in the document), aged about 13, stating that “he lately came from Holland with the said infant, whose father and mother both died on the passage to New York.”[58] As “my loving friend, Mr. John George Cook, of New York” he was appointed executor in the 1757 will of Peter John, of New York City, mariner.[59] His own will, dated 7 April 1764 and proved 13 July 1767, reads, in part, in a published abstract:
      I, John George Cook, of New York, Innholder, being in a low state and declining disposition of body … leave to my eldest son George, over and above his equal share, an eight shilling piece of silver, and my silver shoe buckles. I leave to my wife Elizabeth 1/3 of all my estate for life, also my negro slave Silva. And after my wife’s death, the said slave is to be sold, and the money paid to my children. All the rest of my estate I leave to my children, George, Catharine, John, Elizabeth, Mary, and the child that my wife may be now pregnant with. I make my wife, and Mr. Jacob Remson, merchant, and Mr. Francis Sylvester, cooper, executors. [60]
      Known issue, the last three children being known only from their father’s will (surname Koek or Koch):
      1. Catharina Koch, born 6 August 1746, baptized in the New York Lutheran Church with sponsors Frieder. Becker and Catharina Senger.
      2. Georg Koch, born 16 October 1748, baptized in the New York Lutheran Church with sponsors Joh. Philip Koch and Anneke Sengerin, Rotscher Smid [i.e. Roger Smith] and Johanna ____. He is called “eldest son” in his father’s will.
      3. Johannes Koch, called John in his father’s will.
      4. Elisabetha Koch.
      5. Maria Koch
      6. (perhaps) “the child that my wife may be now pregnant with,” as mentioned in the aforesaid will.
    5. Eberhardt Zenger, baptized (as “Evert”) 14 March 1731,[61] probably died young.
    6. Friedrich Zenger, baptized 7 January 1733,[62] probably died young.
    7. Catharina Zenger, born 1738, died 16 September 1836, aged 98 years. She married Matthias Lane, of Camden, New Jersey, born 1736, died 14 August 1801, of unknown parentage. Both are buried in the Evergreen Cemetery, Camden. Of their issue, we know only of:
      1. Mary Lane, died 25 April 1832. She married 12 March 1806, Ziba Westcott Kellum, of Camden, born 18 February 1782 in New Jersey, d. 25 April 1832 in Chesterfield Tp., Burlington Co., N.J.,[63] son of James Kellum and Elizabeth Westcott.[64] Known issue (besides, apparently, others who died young):
        1. Elizabeth Kellum, born ca. 1810, died 1840-50. Various Internet sources state that she married (as his first wife) 22 July 1828 in Gloucester County, New Jersey, Job Norcross, Jr., and had issue.
        2. Catherine Lane Kellum, born 24 March 1814 at Bordentown, N.J., 19 August 1891; she married (as his second wife) 17 August 1843 at Bordentown, John Williams Patten, of Philadelphia, by whom she had issue.[65]
        3. Eliza Kellum, born 14 August 1816 at Bordentown, died 17 October 1906; she married 12 March 1840 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, George Danaele Patten, and they had issue.[66]
        4. William Kellum, born 1825.
        5. Mary Kellum, born ca. 1826; she married 17 May 1855 at Bordentown, George A. Rogers.
  4. Catharina Maul, born ca. 1698, clearly the unnamed child baptized 12 March 1700 with sponsors Anna Julia Driesch, single woman, Anna Catharin wife of Johan Christ. Betz, and Johan Henrich Grün at ____; living 1723. She joined the church with her elder sister Anna Catharina on 19 February 1718. She married (1) 17 December 1720 in the New York Dutch Church,[67] Michiel Minckelaer.[68] He is called “Michael Mochlaier” in their marriage record, and in the record of her second marriage she is called “widow of Mich’l Moncleur.” she married (2) 8 June 1723 in the New York Dutch Church,[69] Jacob Vollenweiler. We have not traced any issue.
  5. An unnamed child, baptized 19 January 1703 with sponsors Anna Catharina wife of Georg Theiss, Anna Elis[abetha] wife of ____ Grün from ____, and Johan Jacob Wulf from Hohroth; died young.
  6. Ann Maria Maul, probably the unnamed child baptized 26 April 1704 with sponsors Johan Christ. Göbeler, single man, Johann Görg Driesch, single man, An Ursell wife of Johann Christ. Driesch, and Anna Maria, daughter of the Hainberger Conrad at Donsbach. She was received as a communicant in the New York Dutch Church on 26 August 1729. She married 23 June 1738 in the same church,[70] Jacobus Meet, perhaps identical with the Jacob, son of Jan Pieterszen Meet and Grietje Mandeville, baptized 18 January 1693 in the New York Dutch Church.[71] They do not appear to have baptized any children in New York City. Known issue:
    1. Maria Meet, said to have been born 16 February 1746 at Pequanock, Morris Co., New Jersey (IGI).
    2. Hendrickje Meet, baptized 26 July 1747 in the Hackensack Dutch Church, Bergen Co., New Jersey (IGI).
  7. Johannes Maul, born at Hohenroth, baptized 12 January 1709 with sponsors Johanne Maul son of the late Johann Jost Maul in Driedorf, Johan Christ. Petz son of Johann Christ. Betz from Hohnrod, and Anna-Dorth wife of Christianus Clas from Mademühlen; doubtless died by 1710, as he does not appear with this mother in the “List of the Palatines remaining at New York City” of that year.

4.   Christoffel2 Maul,[72] of Hanover Precinct (now Montgomery Tp.), Ulster (now Orange) Co., New York, son of Johannes Maul by his first wife, Anna Juliana Theiss, was baptized 15 January 1688 at Driedorf, Hessen-Nassau, Prussia, and was still alive in 1751. He married probably in 1709-10, Anna Juliana Sergius, baptized 24 March 1689 in Nordhofen Reformed Church with sponsors Anna Lovisa wife of Hans Peter Hördts at Mogendorf, Maria Juliana wife of Bertram Bergs, and Johann Thil Scheyer (?) from Selters, alive in 1751; daughter of Philipp Sergius, of Nordhofen, by the latter’s wife Maria Elisabeth Andreas, daughter of Johann Wilhelm Andreas.
    The family of Christoffel Maul’s father-in-law, Philipp Sergius, appears next to that of Christoffel’s father, Johannes Maul, in a list of persons intending to leave from Holland for England in 1709, although the Sergius family ultimately returned to Holland. The first record of Christoffel Maul in America is on the Hunter list of 4 August 1710. He is not found with his step-mother and sisters in the “List of the Palatines remaining at New York City” of 1710, and he had possibly already removed by then to Kingston, where his eldest child was baptized in 1712, and where he was naturalized on 8/9 September 1715. He was in Capt. Whittaker’s Company of Jacob Rutsen’s Ulster County Regiment in 1715. He and his family were at Hessberg in ca. 1716/17, but more children were baptized in the Kingston Dutch Church in 1717-20, he and his wife served as sponsors in the same church in 1720 and 1722,[73] and he appears in Kingston taxation lists of 1718-21.
    Christoffel Maul removed to Hanover Precinct, Ulster Co., by 1727, when his youngest daughter, Elisabetha, was baptized there; and it would appear that he spent the rest of his life there. He was in the Wallkill Company of the Ulster County Militia in 1738. He and his wife served as sponsors at Montgomery Dutch Church in 1738, 1740, and 1751.[74] His daughter Margariet’s place of residence is given as Wallkill in her marriage record of 1739.
    All of Christoffel Maul’s known children married and had offspring, producing among them at least 57 grandchildren.
    Issue, the first four children being baptized in the Kingston Dutch Church:[75]

  1. Diewertje Maul, born at Kingston, baptized 7 September 1712 with sponsors Gysbert van den Berg and Diewertjen Masten,[76] She was still alive in 1763. She married shortly after 12 April 1730 (the date of publication of the banns) in the Kingston Dutch Church,[77] Andries Decker, baptized 20 June 1708 in the Kingston Dutch Church,[78] living 1756, son of Jacob Decker, of Kingston, by the latter’s second wife, Sarah Minthorn (who had previously been the widow of James Pinnick). Their marriage record states that he was born at Shawangunk (in Ulster County), and she at Kingston. Corroboration of his identity is provided by the name of one of the baptismal sponsors for his eldest child, this sponsor being his elder half-brother, Broer Decker, son of Jacob Decker by his first wife, Beeltje Bastiaense Courtright.[79] Their first child was baptized at Kingston in 1733, and they had ten more children baptized between 1739 and 1756 at Machackemeck (sometimes spelled Machackemack), Ulster Co. (from 1838 Deerpark, now Port Jervis, Orange Co.), N.Y. “Dievertje Maul wife of Andries Decker” became a member of the Dutch Church of Machackemeck on 19 June 1745.[80] As pointed out by Pamela J. Sears, “The family removed to Montague, Sussex, NJ, where Andreas wrote his will in 1760, proved 8 June 1763.”[81] A published abstract reads:
    1760, August 29. Anderis Decker of Montague, Sussex Co., cordwainer.
    Son, Andreas, 4 sides of leather, because he is the eldest son now alive.
    [Other] sons: Andreas; Christopher; Casparius Fryenmoet Decker; Johannis Decker; Jacob Decker; Phillipus Deck; [to the last?] all my real estate.
    Daughters (to each £10): Ledia Weller (wife of Johannis Weller); Gretie Westvael (wife of Cornelis Westvael); Sarah Decker; Dievertie Decker; Elizabeth Decker.
    Wife Dievertie shall be master of all my estate while she is my widow.
    Our subject was probably the “Divertje Dekker, widow,” who married 30 April 1763 at Machackemeck,[82] Alexander Poole, of whom nothing further is known.
        This Decker family was living at Machackemeck certainly into the 1780s and probably into the nineteenth century, but the name Decker became so numerous there that it is difficult to distinguish the various branches of the family.
        Known issue:[83]
    1. Lydia Decker, born about 6 December 1730 (by calculation; her birth fell during a gap in the Kingston baptismal register) at Minisink (per her marriage record), died 30 January 1818, and buried in Montgomery Brick Church Cemetery. She is called “Ledia Weller, wife of Johannis Weller” in her father’s will. She married 28 August 1757 in Montgomery Dutch Church, Johannes Weller, born at Kingston (per his marriage record), baptized 8 January 1721 in the Kingston Dutch Church,[84] died 29 November 1810, and buried in Montgomery Brick Church Cemetery, son of Johann Hieronymus (“Jerome”) Weller, of West Camp, Ulster Co., by the latter’s wife Anna Juliana Kuntz.[85] He was a younger brother of Johann Heinrich Weller, who married Lydia’s aunt, Anna Catharina Maul, below. For further details of them see the Weller genealogy, according to which “they do not appear to have had any issue.”
    2. Grietje Decker, baptized 14 January 1733 at Kingston with sponsors Broer Dekker [the father’s half-brother] and Margriet Mouwl.[86] She is called “Gretie Westvael, wife of Cornelis Westvael” in her father’s 1760 will. As “Grietje Decker, young woman, born at Menissinck and living there,” she married (1) 6 April 1753 in the Dutch Church of Machackemeck aforesaid,[87] Cornelis Westvael, “young man, born at Machackemech and dwelling there,” who was baptized 1 September 1723 in the Kingston Dutch Church,[88] died by 1774, son of Jacob Westvael, of Minisink and of Goshen Precinct, by his wife Margariet De Duytscher.[89] His father’s 1774 will leaves “to the heirs of my son Cornelius, deceased, that is Dievertje and Maregrieet Westfael, a double portion, that is to each equal with my daughters.”[90] She is also stated in the Ancestral File to have been the “Grietje Dekker, widow” who married 2 Jan 1763 in the same church,[91] “Benjamin Van Vliet, widower,” but this may be an error as widows are not usually referred to by their maiden surnames in Dutch-American church records of this period. Known issue by first husband:[92]
      1. Dievertje Westvael, baptized 7 July 1754 at Machackemeck, with sponsors Andries Decker and his wife Diewertje Maul [the mother’s parents]. She was likely the “Divertje Westvaal, unmarried” who had a son Cornelius, baptized 9 February 1773 in the Machackemeck Dutch Church, with sponsors Jacob and Leonora Westvaal.[93]
      2. Margariet Westvael, baptized 13 February 1756 at Machackemeck, with sponsors Jacob Westfael and Margrietje Cole.
    3. Philipp Decker, baptized 26 March 1735 “at Minisink,” by the minister of the Kingston Dutch Church, with sponsors Philippus Maul and Catharina Maul,[94] He died by 1756, when another son was given the same name.
    4. Anna Juliana Decker, baptized 3 May 1737 at Kingston with sponsors Stoffel Maul and Annaatje Julia Sorger [i.e. the mother’s parents].[95] Given the absence of any mention of this daughter in her father’s will, she is probably not the “Anna Juliana Decker, young dame, born at Shippekonk [in Sussex Co., New Jersey] & dwelling there” married 16 February 1755 in the Machackemeck Dutch Church,[96] Johannes Bevier, “born at Nepenack [i.e. Napanoch, now included in the town of Wawarsing, in Ulster County] & dwelling there.” He is not accounted for in the Bevier chapter in Le Fevre’s History of New Paltz, or in Hasbrouck’s 1970 Bevier genealogy.[97] This couple does not appear to have baptized any children at Machackemeck or at Kingston.
    5. Sarah Decker, baptized 29 May 1739 at Machackemeck, with sponsors Stephanus Ditsoort and Sara Horenbeek; alive and unmarried in 1760, when she is mentioned in her father’s will.
    6. Andries Decker, Jr. (the eldest surviving son), baptized 19 September 1740 at Machackemeck, with sponsors Jan Waert and Geertje Westfael.
    7. Dievertje Decker, baptized 7 May 1743 at Machackemeck, with sponsors Willem Kortregt and Margriet Janse; alive and unmarried in 1760, when she is mentioned in her father’s will.
    8. Christoffel (“Christopher”) Maul Decker, baptized 23 December 1744 at Machackemeck, with sponsors Johannes Maul and Lisabeth Maul. He is mentioned in his father’s will. As “Stuffel Dekker” he married 12 August 1768 in the Machackemeck Dutch Church, Mary McCarty.[98] Known issue, all baptized at Machackemeck:[99]
      1. Andries Decker, baptized 29 April 1772 as a son of Christopher Decker and Maria McCharty, with sponsors William M’Charty and Elizabeth M’Charty. He is presumably the Andrew Decker who married by 1800, Mary Dewitt, and had the following issue baptized at Machackemeck (the records giving the dates of birth rather than of baptism).[100]
        1. Christopher Decker, born 31 October 1800.
        2. Cornelius Dewitt Decker, born 31 January 1804.
        3. Peter Decker, born 6 April 1806.
        4. Hester Decker, born 21 September 1808.
      2. Jacobus Decker, baptized 9 July 1777 as a son of Christopher Decker and Mariea [sic] McKarter, one of the sponsors being James McCarty.
      3. Polly Decker, baptized 29 October 1780, no sponsors being named in the record; possibly died young if “Polly” was intended for “Mary,” since her parents named a daughter Maria the following year.
      4. Maria Decker, baptized 6 September 1781, no sponsors being named in the record.
    9. Elisabeth Decker, baptized 1 February 1747 at Machackemeck, with sponsors Johannes Corn. Westbroeck and Elisabeth Swartwout; alive in 1760, when she is mentioned in her father’s will. One of this name married 27 October 1776 in the Machackemeck Dutch Church, Levy Decker. However, it has also been suggested that she may have married Hendricus Van Etten.
    10. Casparus Fryenmoet Decker [triplet], baptized 7 May 1749 at Machackemeck, with sponsors J.C. Fryenmout [i.e. Johannes Casparus Fryenmoet, the first pastor of Machackemeck] and his wife Magdalena Van Etten. He was alive in 1760, when he is mentioned in his father’s will, but no further trace of him has been found in Machackemeck records.
    11. Johannes Decker [triplet], baptized 7 May 1749 at Machackemeck, with sponsors Johannes Decker and his wife Lisabeth De Witt. He was alive in 1760, when he is mentioned in his father’s will. He is perhaps the “Johannes Decker, widower … born in Machackemeck” who married 26 August 1767 in the Dutch Church of Wawarsing, Ulster Co., Sara Hoornbeek, single woman, born at Rochester, both parties being of Rochester at the time; although admittedly he would at the time have been quite young for a widower. They were the parents of Daniel Decker, baptized 5 June 1774 in the same church, no sponsers being mentioned.
    12. Peter Decker [triplet], baptized 7 May 1749 at Machackemeck, with sponsors Pieter Gomaer and his wife Tjaetje de Witt; presumably died by 1760 as he is not mentioned in her father’s will.
    13. Jacob Decker, baptized 12 November 1751 at Machackemeck, with sponsors Jacob Van Aken and Margriet Van Garden. He was alive in 1760, when he is mentioned in his father’s will. A Jacobus Decker married 16 May 1776 in the Machackemeck Dutch Church,[101] Asseltie Vanaken, possibly the Usseltje [i.e. Urseltje] van Aken baptized 20 April 1759 in the Machackemeck Dutch Church, daughte rof Johannes van Aken and Maria van Gorde.[102]
    14. Philippus Decker, baptized 26 November 1756 at Machackemeck, with sponsors Benjamin Vanoy and Lidia Westvael. He was alive in 1760, when he is mentioned in his father’s will.
  2. Margaretha Maul, baptized 19 September 1714 with sponsors Frederik Mool [no. 2.ii] and Margriet Snyder,[103] She was still alive in 1751. She married 26 August 1739 in the Kingston Dutch Church,[104] Benjamin Constable, living 1751. Their marriage record states that he was “born and resident in Hurley,” and she “born in Kingston, and resident at the Wallkill.” She, with her younger sister Anna Catharina, was received as a communicant of the Montgomery Dutch Church in October 1732, they being among the founding members of the congregation.[105] She and her husband appeared as sponsors at the baptism of her niece Magdalena Weller, below, in 1751.[106]
        Known issue, all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church:[107]
    1. Philipp Constable, baptized 7 October 1740 with sponsors Philippus Maul and Antje Constable. He married by 1767, Catharine Melsbach. Known issue, all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church:
      1. Margaret Constable, baptized 20 June 1767 with sponsors Benjamin Constable and his wife Geertje Schlimmer.
      2. Philippus Constable, baptized 29 October 1768 with sponsors Benjamin Constable and his wife Geertje Schlimer. He would seem to be the one of this name who married before 1791, Hannah Wallace, and had the following issue (all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church, but the records of this period give only the date of the birth, not that of the baptism):
        1. Catharine Constable, born 16 May 1791.
        2. Anna Constable, born 12 July 1792.
    2. Maria Constable, baptized 17 May 1743 with sponsors John Henrich Weller and his wife Ann Catharine Maul, died by 1749, when another daughter was given the same name.
    3. Christopher Constable, baptized 20 May 1745 with sponsors Christopher Maul and his wife Anna Julia Segins [sic]. He was dead by 1799, when “Elisabeth Crist, widow of Christopher Constable,” served as baptismal sponsor to a child of their daughter Lena. He married 29 December 1768 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Elizabeth Christ. Known issue (all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church):
      1. Benjamin Constable, baptized 3 June 1769, with sponsors Benjamin Constable and Geertje Slemmer. In an earlier version of these notes, we had suggested that he may have been the Benjamin Constable who married by 1799, Elisabeth Youngblood, and had an only known child, Absalom Constable, born 21 November 1799, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (date of baptism not stated in record). However, as was kindly pointed out to us by Sue Devine, despite the reading of the original record the father was actually Benjamin Comfort, who married 17 December 1780 in the Godwill Presbyterian Church, Elizabeth Youngblood, and had ten children by her; the connection is amply born out by the 1971 Comfort genealogy.[108]
      2. Annatje Constable, baptized 5 December 1771, with sponsors John Newkirk, Jr., and Sarah Bodyn.
      3. Helena Constable, baptized 6 February 1774,[109] with sponsors Matthew Velten and his wife Helen. As Lena Constable she baptized a daughter Julia, born 22 January 1799, in the Montgomery Dutch Church on an unspecified date, the sponsor being her mother, “Elisabeth Crist, widow of Christopher Constable.” According to the record, she had “made oath before a magistrate that Jeremiah Dunn is the father.”
      4. David Constable, born 30 June 1776, baptized 21 July following, with sponsors Anton Stevens and his wife (not named), died ____ (stone broken), “aged 50 years, 4 months, 12 days,” and buried with his wife and two children in the Montgomery Dutch Churchyard. He married Catharine ____, born ca. 25 July 1783, died 3 November 1852, “aged 69 years, 3 months, 5 days.” Buried with them are:
        1. James C. Constable, born ca. 12 October 1816, died 16 September 1842, “aged 25 years, 11 months, 4 days.”
        2. Christopher Constable, born ca. 12 March 1823, died 20 November 1843, “aged 20 years, 8 months, 8 days.”
      5. Johannes Constable, born ca. 29 May 1779, baptized 4 July following (no sponsors being named in the record), died (probably unmarried) 1 October 1850, “aged 71 years, 4 months, 2 days,” and buried other members of his family in the Montgomery Dutch Churchyard.
      6. Elisabeth Constable, baptized 16 December 1781, no sponsors being named in the record.
      7. Fanny Constable, born ca. 3 March 1784, baptized 7 March following, no sponsors being named in the record, died (unmarried) 12 August 1853, “aged 69 years, 5 months, 9 days,” and buried with her brother Johannes in the Montgomery Dutch Churchyard.
      8. Catharine Constable, born 6 September 1786, baptized 17 November following, no sponsors being named in the record.
      9. Rachel Constable, born 6 February 1790, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch church but the date not given in the record (nor the names of any sponsors).
      10. Hannah Constable, born 15 October 1791, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch church but the date not given in the record (nor the names of any sponsors).
    4. Maria Constable, baptized 23 May 1749 with sponsors Johannis Maul and his wife Maria Catharine Menges.
    5. Benjamin Constable, Jr. [twin], baptized 19 January 1751 with sponsors John Macklean and his wife Maria Maul.
    6. Deborah Constable [twin], baptized 19 January 1751 with sponsors Andriew Dekker and his wife DeVertje Maul.
    7. Johannes (not John) Constable, baptized 24 October 1754, with sponsors Johannis Maul and Maria Catharine Maul. He married by 1777, Anna Maria Kimberg. Known issue (all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church):
      1. Benjamin Constable, born 5 September 1777, baptized 5 October following with sponsors Benjamin Constable and his wife Maria.
      2. George Constable, baptized 20 December 1779, with sponsor George Kimberg. “Jane Buchanan, June 6 1784 – May 17 1814, wife of George Constable,” is buried in the Montgomery Dutch Churchyard.
      3. Abraham Constable, baptized 3 March 1782 (no sponsors named in record).
      4. Elsje Constable, baptized 4 July 1784 (no sponsors named in record).[110]
      5. Margariet Constable, born 17 September 1786, baptized 18 November following (no sponsors named in record).
      6. Annatje Constable, born 24 February 1789, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch church but the date not given in the record (nor the names of any sponsors).
      7. Isaac Constable, born 11 May 1791, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch church but the date not given in the record (nor the names of any sponsors).
      8. Moses Constable, born 28 December 1798, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch church but the date not given in the record (nor the names of any sponsors).
  3. Anna Catharina Maul, baptized 3 November 1717 with sponsors Henderik Fees, Anna Catryna Moul, and Anna Catryna Weeden,[111] living 1753. She married shortly after 26 August 1739 (the date of publication of the banns) in the Kingston Dutch Church,[112] Johann Heinrich Weller,[113] born 9 December 1716, baptized 16 December following in West Camp Lutheran Church, living 1753, son of Johann Hieronymus (“Jerome”) Weller, of West Camp, Ulster Co., by the latter’s wife Anna Juliana Kuntz. Their marriage record states that he was “born at the Beaver Kill,” and that both parties were “resident at the Walkill.” As Cathrina Maul she, with her elder sister Margaretha, was received as a communicant in the Montgomery Dutch Church in October 1732, they being among the founding members of the congregation.[114] Her husband joined the church on 22 May 1744. On 7 September 1742, as “Henrick Weller and Catharine Moul,” they served there as baptismal sponsors to his niece, Margaretha, eldest child of his brother Johann Wilhelm Weller. We cannot find evidence that either of this couple was alive after 1753. A late nineteenth-century account of their son Wilhelmus given in Ruttenber & Clark, History of Orange County, pp. 435-6, claims that his parents died “on … passage to America” when he was “about nine years old”; the chronology of this story is hopelessly garbled, but it may nevertheless preserve some genuine tradition of them having died when their son Wilhlemus was still young.
        After preparing the following account, we learned from a correspondent that this family had already been studied much more thoroughly in Ralph H. Weller, The Hieronimus Weller Family in America (Alcove, N.Y., 1999). We do not wish to replicate the extensive treatment of this family given therein, but have left our reconstruction in place for what it is worth.
        Known issue, all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church:[115]
    1. Anna Juliana Weller, baptized 7 October 1740 with sponsors Christopher Maul and Ann Julian Segius, his wife; died young.
    2. Anna Juliana Weller, baptized 7 September 1742 with sponsors Johannis Weller and Elisabeth Moul. She married (as his second wife) some time in 1760-66, Johannes/John Miller, Jr.,[116] of Wallkill, Orange Co., died v.p. 1774 at the Wallkill, “by an accident … the particulars of which are not known,” son of Johannes Miller, of Shawangunk, Ulster Co., and Jemima Schoonmaker. Her husband “was the first town clerk [of Wallkill] in 1768, and held the office for several years,” according to Eager’s history of the county, which further states:
      His death was caused by an accident in 1774, the particulars of which are not known. He was found dead in the Walkill, in the vicinity of his father’s residence. The supposition of the family was that he was drowned in an attempt to swim his horse across the Walkill, though himself an expert swimmer. It is not known whether he or his father built the old stone house.
          As it respects the character and general reputation of this individual, all knowledge and tradition of him unite in saying that he was an honest, upright Dutchman — a pious, praying, conscientious man:— that he was the usual umpire in settling the disputes and controversies of the neighborhood, and his decisions were generally acquiescedin:— that, in the destitute condition of the country as regarded settled ministers, Miller was frequently called on and sent to pray with the sick, and administer words of consolation to the dying….
          The consequence of this unexpected death was, that it deprived the family of its natural head and protector at a time, when, from the age of the children, the disturbed condition of the country verging daily to an outbreak with the mother country, his protection and presence could be illy dispensed with; and the care of the mother and children instantly devolved principally upon Johannes, the eldest son, then a mere lad…. The family were Lutheran, and so remained till after the Revolution and until all the families of that denomination of Christians in the settlement at the place, were swallowed up by, or merged into other denominations.
      By his first wife, Esther Bull, he was mother of John Miller (III), husband of Eve Mould (no. 6.iv). Accounts of their issue in the two county histories are in serious disagreement, which we cannot claim to have reconciled beyond doubt. The later of them, that by Ruttenber & Clark (1881), assigns him only one child, “James W. [Miller] … the father of John, James W., and Samuel, residents of Newburgh,” but this almost certainly should read “David [Miller] … father of John, James W., and Samuel….” Much of their account is copied verbatim from the earlier history by Eager (“1846-7”), and it looks as if they simply skipped over the passage in which he lists the issue of Johannes Miller and Anna Weller, as follows (order revised on the basis of baptismal records, and the children Jacob and Leah added):[117]
      1. Catharine Miller, born 26 September 1764, baptized 27 October following at the Hebron Lutheran Church, Montgomery, with sponsors Henrich Weller and wife Catharine; died 1 October 1841 at Crawford, Orange Co.She married 17 January 1780 in the Presbyterian Church, Goshen, Daniel Bull, born 11 August 1762, died 14 November 1749, and buried in Hopewell Cemetery, son of Thomas Bull and Mary Kerr. There is a lengthy account of him in Eager’s history, from which we quote:
        We cannot in this place omit an honorable mention of this gentleman, now one of the oldest inhabitants of the town, about 86 years of age. He was the son of Thomas Bull, who was the son of William Bull, the early settler at Hamptonburgh…. His father Thomas was infirm towards the latter part of his life, and when about to make his will and settle his worldly affairs, had thoughts of selling his land in Crawford, which was then worth about $2.50 per acre, and for which he had an offer; and asked his son Daniel — then a lad of about fifteen years of age — whether he had better sell it or let him take care of it. Daniel replied, that if he would give it to him he “would try to take care of it.” His father concluded to try him and made his will accordingly. This gave the young man confidence and increased his pride; and the community at this day can judge of the manner in which he fulfilled this early filial promise. In 1780, when nineteen years of nge, he married Miss Catharine Miller, who was younger still, and forthwith commenced clearing up his new estate.
            The winter of 1780 was celebrated all over this country for its length and the depth of its snow…. Mr. Bull and Miss Miller went to Goshen to be married by Mr. Carr of the Episcopal church, and that day a fall of snow commenced, which, with previous ones, deepened the road so much there was no travelling the next day. There the new married pair spent two weeks of the honeymoon. Thirteen children were the fruits of this early marriage, the most of whom grew up and were married….
            Mr. Bull has been an industrious farmer from his early days and now enjoys its legitimate rewards — a long life, an honest character, abundant means and a numerous descent. As an evidence of his practical agriculture, we refer the reader to the list of prizes awarded him by the society, which we think are more numerous than those awarded to any other family in the county. Few individuals have cleared up and subdued more wild land, and placed it in a good agricultural condition for their children…. He must now be looked upon as the Patriarch of this town, with numerous descendents planted and growing up around him. He was an early friend to the construction of the Newburgh and Cochecton Turnpike Road, and with an interval of one year, has continued a director from the organization of the company — upwards of forty years…. We copy from a newspaper the following notice of him:
        On Tuesday last, at Hopewell, in the town of Montgomery, a most interesting meeting took place, at the house of Daniel Bull. Mr. and Mrs Bull had long contemplated having all their children and grand children to visit them at the same time, and were then gratified with the sight.
            These two individuals — neither of whom is yet sixty years of age — were married in the year 1780. They have had thirteen children, nine sons and daughters-in-law, and fifty-two grand children; making in all a family of seventy-six. Of this number all are alive and in health except two; one a child, and the other a grand child….
            The health of this family is remarkable. Notwithstanding the great increase of their number, there had not occurred a single death in about thirty-three years. And the fact that a family of seventy-four persons should all be in health and able to attend on such an occasion, is truly wonderful and demands a grateful heart.
            Another particular deserving of notice is, that seven of the children who are married, are settled in the immediate neighborhood of their parents; the most distant is not more than two miles from the old mansion house. One of the other two children resides at the distance of eight miles and the other twenty…. — Index of June 12, 1821.[118]
        For an account of their issue see the Weller genealogy.
      2. Jacob Miller, born 7 January 1766, baptized 3 May following in the Hebron Lutheran Church, Montgomery, with sponsors Jacob Reusli and wife; probably died young, as he was unknown to the historian Eager who was personally acquainted with this family.
      3. David Miller, born 23 April 1767, died 16 February 1843, “aged 75 years, 8 months & 24 days.” He started a store at 29 Water Street, Newburgh, which was afterward operated by his son James and the latter’s son James Jr. He married Ann Wilkins, born 26 September 1764, died 17 May 1841, “aged 76 years, 7 months & 21 days,” and they are buried together in the Old Town Burying Ground, Newburgh. For further details see the Weller genealogy.
      4. Jonathan Miller, born ca. 1768. For further details see the Weller genealogy.
      5. Henry Miller, born 20 February 1769, baptized 4 May following in the Hebron Lutheran Church, Montgomery, without sponsors. See further in the Weller genealogy.
      6. Leah Miller, born 24 September 1770, baptized 6 November following in the Hebron Lutheran Church, Montgomery, no sponsors being named in the record; died 13 December 1770 per burial records of the same church.
      7. Levi Miller, born 26 June 1772, baptized 4 July 1772 in the Hebron Lutheran Church, Montgomery, alive in 1797. He married after 3 November 1794 (the date of her father’s will), but evidently very soon after, his first cousin once removed, Susannah Comfort, born 11 January 1777, baptized 20 December 1777 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, living 1797, daughter of John Comfort and Anna Maul. Known issue (for further details see the Weller genealogy):
        1. John Comfort Miller, born 14 September 1795, and baptized in the Hopewell Presbyterian Church.
        2. Henry Weller Miller, born 17 May 1797, and baptized in the Hopewell Presbyterian Church.
    3. Wilhelmus Weller, born about Jan. 1745, baptized 20 May 1745 with sponsors William Weller and is wife Marutje Stokkeraad, died 30 March 1777, “aged 32 years, 2 months,” and buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard, his tombstone stating that he served in the 5the Regiment, of Dutchess County Militia. But he was in Ulster County when, and as “Helmus Weller, of Hanover, blacksmith” he made a will, dated 20 March 1777, in which he left his entire estate to his wife for her lifetime or until she remarried (in which case she was to have clothing, bedding, and £50), and after her death to his “oldes[t] son Henry,” who was to pay £100 to his brothers, “to only be divided amonge my three sons William, Absalum and Hiram … when they are of age,” William being probably the next eldest as he is named as next in line to the estate. The phraseology concerning the distribution of the £100 is curious considering that earlier in the will the testator mentions “my children,” apparently alluding to his daughters, but to whom he leaves nothing. One of the witnesses to the will was a William Comfort, whom we take to have been the husband of the testator’s aunt, Elisabetha Maul (below), or else the latter’s son, William Comfort, Jr.[119] The wife’s name, which is not given in the will itself, is revealed when on 26 May 1790, “Eleanor Weller, a widow of the said Wilhelmus Weller, deceased,” was granted administration of the estate.[120] She may be identified as Eleanor Bull, born 4 March 1745 at Hamptonburgh, Orange Co., daughter of William Bull and Sarah Wells,[121] despite the fact that the tombstone of “Eleanor widow of Wilhelmus Weller” in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard, gives her date of death as 12 September 1818 and her age as 71 years, 6 months, 7 days, which would imply a birthdate of about 5 March 1747. The age on the tombstone is surely wrong or has been misread, since a statement made less than 30 years after her death gives her date of birth as 4 March 1745, names her husband as “Henry [sic] Weller, of Montgomery” (evidently confusing her husband with her son), and states that they had seven children.[122] She may have been known as ”Nelly” — which was used a diminutive not only for Eleanor but for Helen and Petronella — for the Dutch clerks recorded her as “Petronella Bull” in the baptismal records of her children Hendrick (1766), Wilhelmus (1767), Hester (1769), and Absalom (1771). She was a sister of Esther (Bull) Miller, mother-in-law of no. 6.iv.
          It has been claimed that this man was father of Elizabeth Weller who married in 1765, Christian Crist, of Orange County,[123] but the chronological impossibility of this statement should be obvious.
          We have already mentioned the garbled account of this man in Ruttenber & Clark, History of Orange County, pp. 435-6; this source is however seemingly reliable concerning more recent events, and correctly gives the names of six children, Henry, William, Absalom, Hiram, Esther, and Catharine. Issue (all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church):[124]
      1. Henry Weller (eldest son), baptized (as “Hendrick”) 31 May 1766, with sponsors Hendrick Weller and his wife Elsje Muller; living 1777. He was probably the Henry Weller who married by 1791, Ann Kidd,[125] and had the following issue, all born in Montgomery Tp.:[126]
        1. The Rev. Sidney Weller, born 1791; married Laura Maria Meachan. There is a much fuller account of them in the 1999 Weller genealogy, p. 162. He was the founder of the first commercial winery in North Carolina, Medoc Vineyard, and he and his son Mirza are discussed in a recent article in the Halifax County, North Carolina, Genealogical Society Newsletter (Dec. 2007).[127]
        2. Maria Weller, born 14 December 1792, died (unmarried?) 5 May 1858 at Pine Bush, Orange Co.
        3. Emily Weller, born 26 September 1796, baptized 4 December following in the Goodwill Presybterian Church, died (unmarried?) 18 May 1828 at Graham.
        4. Mirza Weller [male], born 25 December 1799, died 13 May 1828 at Graham; married Catharine Wallace.
        5. Leander Weller, apparently of Hamburg, Erie Co., New York, baptized 16 August 1801 in the Goodwill Presbyterian Church. He married Emily Abbott.
        6. Hervey Weller, born 1803, died 12 August 1874; married Elizabeth Bookstaver.
        7. Alfred Weller, born 16 June 1805, died 28 March 1872 at Hopewell, Crawford Tp., Orange Co. He married 12 September 1832 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, his third cousin, Catherine Dickerson (no. 6.i.d.7 below), daughter of Adam Dickerson, of Montgomery, by the latter’s wife Jane Houston. This man is mentioned in Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County, New York, p. 375, as having been born at Crawford in 1800 (sic) and died in 1866 (sic), but as his father is stated to have been “Henry Weller … of German descent … of an honorable Orange County family” and his wife is identified as “Catherine Dickerson … also a native of the town of Crawford … [daughter of] Adam Dickerson … a native of this county,” it is clear that the same person is intended. (For a possible identification of his father-in-law, Adam Dickerson see below.) This couple had the following known issue (order uncertain):
          1. Alanson Y. Weller, of Newburgh, merchant, born 1837 at Crawford, who married and had issue.[128]
          2. Joseph H. Weller, of New York City, merchant, born 1846 at Montgomery, died 14 November 1886, who married and had issue.[129]
          3. Cecilia Gilespie Weller, who married a kinsman, Milton Frederick Bull.
        8. Henry Howard Weller, born 24 June 1808, died 25 January 1862 in Cannon Tp.; married Mehitabel Haines.
      2. William Weller, baptized 31 October 1767 with sponsors Wilhelmus Covert [i.e. Comfort] and his wife Elisabeth Maul, living 1777. He is said to have married Ann Denniston, born 23 January 1777, died 26 September 1801.[130]
      3. Esther Weller, said to have been born July 1769, baptized (as “Hester”) 19 August 1769 (no sponsors named in record), died 9 September 1843, aged 74 years, 2 months, and 4 days, and buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard. She married 19 October 1797, John Felter, born 25 April 1762, died 11 September 1843, aged 82 years, 4 months, and 18 days, and buried with his wife.[131] On 21 March 1831 “Esther Weller, wife of John Felter,” obtained a dismissal from the Montgomery Dutch Church in order to transfer to another congregation. Known issue, all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church (the regster giving the dates of births, not of baptisms):
        1. Susan Felter, born 9 March 1799.
        2. Theron Felter, born 21 February 1801.
        3. Edwin Felter, born 4 November 1803.
        4. Grenville Felter, born 17 October 1806.
        5. Alonzo David Felter, born 27 February 1809.
      4. Absalom Weller, said to have been born 9 October 1771, baptized 12 October 1771 (no sponsors named in record), said to have died 9 October 1827 (i.e. on his 56th birthday).[132] His is the family buried in the Weller Burying Ground, between Wallkill and Crawford, his tombstone stating (if the reading is correct) that he died 3 October 1827, aged 56 years; the six persons surnamed Weller who are buried with him and his wife may perhaps have been children of theirs who died young, but no relationship is stated in the inscriptions.[133] He was enumerated at Wallkill in the 1800 and 1810 censuses.[134] He married 12 December 1799 in the Goodwill Presbyterian Church, Orange Co., Elizabeth Rau or Rowe, born 21 May 1779 at Montgomery, died 28 April 1854 at Wallkill, Orange Co. (this is in agreement with her tombstone, which states that she died 28 April 1854, aged 74 years and 11 months), daughter of Matthew Rowe and Margaret Wrisley.[135] An Absalom Weller is listed at Wallkill Precinct in the 1800 census, although we have not checked the original record. Eager’s Outline History of Orange County lists an Absalom Weller as the winner of a number of agricultural prizes in 1820, 1821, and 1822.[136] Known issue:[137]
        1. Lectus Marcus [?] Weller,[138] born 28 January 1801 (his baptismal record says 25 Jan.), baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (date of baptism not state in record); married Nellie Hudson Thompson.
        2. Eliza Maria Weller, born November 1806, died 20 October 1891.
        3. Catherine Susan Weller, born 4 September 1808 at Crawford, N.Y., died 17 February 1888 at Hartford, Connecticut. She married 19 April 1826 at Bloomingburg, Sullivan County, N.Y., William Francis Dickerson, born 20 September 1801, died 18 December 1878 at Hartford, son of Benjamin Dickerson and Esther Ogden.[139]
        4. Eleanor Weller, born 20 February 1813, died 13 February 1897.
        5. Alpheus Weller (twin), born 15 May 1815; married Mary Faulkner.
        6. Theodore V. Weller (twin), born 15 May 1815, died 8 January 1898; married Elizabeth A. Elder.
      5. Catharina Weller, born 21 May 1773, baptized 27 June 1773 (no sponsors named in record). We have found no further record of her in contemporary sources, but she probably lived to adulthood, as she is mentioned in the account of her brother, Wilhelmus, in the Ruttenber & Clark, History of Orange County, cited above.
      6. Philip Weller, born 18 April 1775, baptized 10 June following (without sponsors), died 8 August 1776, aged 1 year, 3 months, and 18 days, and buried with his parents.
      7. Hiram Weller, born 6 November 1776, and baptized 5 January 1777 (without sponsors), living 1777 and probably 1801. He is perhaps the one of this name enumerated in Montgomery Township, Orange County, in the 1800 census.[140] He may have been the one of this name who married by 1801, Elizabeth Low, and had an only known child:
        1. Milton Weller, born 22 August 1802, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (date of baptism not given in record), died 16 December 1881. He married 27 January 1827, Elizabeth Libolt, and had issue.[141]
    4. Philip Weller, baptized 11 August 1747 with sponsors Philippus Maul and Marytje Maul, died 1775 at Montgomery. For our account of this man we are much indebted to the researches of a descendant, Donald Carl Embler.[142] He married before 1770, and probably before 1769, Hannah McCord, born 30 November 30 1752 in Ulster Co., died 26 November 1827 at Neelytown, N.Y., and buried in Neelytown Cemetery, N.Y. (under the name Wilkin). Known issue (all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church):
      1. (probably) Bartholomew Weller, born 1768-69, died 24 September 1846 “in his 78th year,” and buried with the family of Henry P. Weller, below.
      2. Henry P. Weller, born 21 February 1770 at Montgomery, baptized 8 June 1771 as a child of Philip Weller and “Ann Markoren,” no sponsors being named in the record, died 15 September 1832 at Montgomery, aged 62 years, 6 months, and 24 days, and buried in the Dutch churchyard. He married (1) 21 April 1791 in the First Presbyterian Church of Goshen, N.Y.,[143] Letty Thompson, born 28 June 1773, died in 1803-09, daughter of John Thompson and Hannah Brooks. He married (2) Catharine Decker, born about mid-May 1763 (if her age at death is not exaggerated), died 17 November 1846, aged 73 years, 6 months, and buried with her husband. Issue:

        (by first wife:)

        1. John Wilkens Weller, born 14 March 1792.
        2. Sally Maria Weller, born 1 June 1793.
        3. Hannah Weller, born 11 December 1795 at Montgomery, died there 22 September 1843. She married 21 March 1812 in the Dutch Church of Shawangunk, Adam Embler, son of Andrew Embler and Mary Catherine Tiers. They were ancestors of Donald Carl Embler aforesaid. Known issue, all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church (the register giving the dates of birth, not of baptism):
          1. Lettie Embler, born 17 January 1813.
          2. Harriet Embler, born 5 November 1818.
          3. Adam Embler, born 3 October 1820.
          4. Martha Tears Embler, born 2 January 1823.
          5. Sarah Embler, born 25 October 1824.
        4. Harriette Weller, born 14 February 1796.
        5. Henry L. Weller, born 14 July 1800 at Montgomery, died 6 August 1825, aged 25 years, and buried with his father. He married Sarah Sears, who is buried with him, but the inscription wa completely illegible in 1925.
        6. Hiram Weller, born 1803.

        (by second wife:)

        1. Letty Maria Weller, born 27 June 1810, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church. She married 28 October 1833 in the same church, Daniel Bookstaver, and had issue. See the Weller genealogy, p. 172.
        2. Catharine Weller, born 6 May 1812, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died unmarried 29 August 1882, and buried in the Montgomery New Cemetery.
      3. Andrew Weller, born 11 April 1773, baptized 23 May following; no sponsors named.
    5. “Lena” Weller, baptized 18 March 1751 with sponsors Benjamin Constable and his wife Maria Maul.
    6. Catharina Weller, baptized 15 May 1753 with sponsors Johannis Maul and his wife Maria Menges.
  4. 5Johannes Maul, born ca. 1 July 1720, baptized 31 July following with sponsors Frederik Mool [no. 2.ii] and Ossertjen Mool [i.e. Urseltje, his wife].[144]
  5. 6Philipp Maul, baptized 12 October 1722 in ____ Church.
  6. Maria Maul, baptized 16 July 1724 in ____ Church. She married by 1751, John McLean.[145] She was apparently received as a communicant in the Montgomery Dutch Church in May 1747.[146]
        Known issue:[147]
    1. Anna McLean, baptized 15 October 1751 at Montgomery, with sponsors Frederick Weller and his wife Anna Margaret Koch. A Hannah McLean and Hugh Sudderle were parents of Margaret Sudderle, baptized 31 May 1772 in the Montgomery Dutch Church with sponsors Jacob Christ and Antje Buchstaber.
    2. Maria McLean, baptized 10 November 1753 at Montgomery, with sponsors Philip Maul and Margaret Constable. A Maria M’Clean married 23 December 1773 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, William Moor, but this couple does not appear to have baptized any children in that church.
  7. Elisabetha Maul, stated by the Bottings to have been baptized 25 September 1727 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, but this seems to predate the earliest extant records. Elisabeth Maul was received as a communicant in the Montgomery Dutch Church on 22 May 1744. She served as a baptismal sponsor with her brother Johannes in the Machackemeck Dutch Church in 1745. She married by 1754,[148] William Comfort,[149] brother of John Comfort below. See our COMFORT page for him and their issue.
  8. Anna Maul, baptized (as Annaatje) 17 April 1734 in the Montgomery Dutch Church with sponsors Henrick Christ and Maria Elisabeth Christ (hers being only the fourth baptism recorded in the church); living 1794. Anna Maul (apparently a single woman at the time) was received as a communicant in the Montgomery Dutch Church on 24 May 1750. She must have married by that summer at the latest, [150] John Comfort,[151] born ca. 1725, died 1795, son of Benjamin Comfort, of Hanover Precinct (now Montgomery Tp.), by his wife Elizabeth Heywood. See our COMFORT page for him and their issue.

5.   Johannes3 Maul,[152] of Hanover Precinct (now Montgomery Tp.), son of Christoffel Maul and Anna Juliana Sergius, was born ca. 1 July 1720, and baptized 31 July following in the Kingston Dutch Church,[153] died (testate) 15 March 1804, aged 83 years, 7 months, and 15 days, and was buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard. He married 6 September 1743 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Maria Catharina Menges,[154] born ca. 22 April 1723, baptized 2 May following,[155] died 26 May 1806, and buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard, daughter of Johannes Menges, of Montgomery, by his third wife, Anna Eva Busch.
    Johannes Maul was received as a communicant in the Montgomery Dutch Church on 8 April 1738. In their marriage record he is called of Kingston, and she of Wallkill. He was a sponsor in the Machackemeck Dutch Church in 1745. He and his wife were sponsors in the Montgomery Dutch Church in 1753, 1756, and 1760.[156] He is said to have been a Sergeant in Captain Newkirk’s Company of Militia in 1756 for guarding the Western frontier, and to have served during the Revolutionary War in Colonel McClanghry’s Regiment.[157] It is also said that he “gave money to the government in its extreme necessity.”[158] His will, which we have not seen, is dated 2 March 1791.
    Known issue, all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church:

  1. Anna Maul, baptized 29 April 1746 with sponsors Christopher Maul and his wife Anna Julia Seger [sic], died 7 January 182_ (stone chipped), “aged 84 years.” she married by 1767, Abraham Dickerson, of Hanover Precinct (now Montgomery Tp.), born 10 April 1741 on Long Island, died 8 December 1814 (the records of Montgomery Dutch Church say 9 Dec.), “aged 74 years,” son of William Dickerson, of Southold, Suffolk Co., Long Island, by the latter’ wife Dorothy Cory.[159] There is a good sketch of him in a booklet on the Goodwill Presybterian Church published in 1880, which states, “Abraham Dickerson (as the name is written in all the family records, though in the church records we find it Dickinson) was born on Long Island, April 10th, 1741. When yet a young man he came with his sister, Rowanna, to the Wallkill precinct. He married Annie Mould, and his sister married Christopher Mould, Annie’s brother. To Abraham and his wife Annie were born four children… [of whom a detailed record is then given]. Abraham Dickerson died December 8th, 1814, having served in the eldership from 1770.“[160] He must apparently be distinguished with a contemporary Abraham Dickinson, who baptized a daughter Mary in the Goodwill Presybterian Church in 1770, unless his own Mary baptized three years earlier did not survive, and there was a second daughter of the same name. Known issue (all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church):[161]
    1. Molly or Polly Dickerson, baptized (as “Nelly”) 31 October 1767, without sponsors; married Jacob(us) Alsdorf. We have not traced any issue of this couple.
    2. Antje Dickerson, born 10 December 1772, baptized 10 January 1773, without sponsors. She married 10 December 1789 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, Jacob Millspaugh, born ca. 29 June 1766, died 17 April 1808, “aged 41 years, 9 months, 18 days,” and buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard, said to have been a son of Jacob Millspaugh [i.e. Melsbach], of Montgomery Tp., by his wife Elisabetha Buchstäber.[162] Only known child:
      1. Martinus Millspaugh, born 31 January 1799, baptized in the Montgomry Dutch Church.
    3. Eleanora Dickerson, born 8 Sept 1775, baptized 8 October following, without sponsors; died 1829. She married 25 November 1795 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, William Soper, a judge, born 1769, died 1837, who came to America from Exeter, England, about 1783, lived for some time at Shawangunk, and finally settled at Marlborough, Ulster Co., in 1810.[163] According to the nineteenth-century historian of Marlborough, “He was in the slooping [i.e. boat-building] business, and had a store, living where Townsend’s hotel is located [in 1887]. He was justice of the peace and supervisor from 1820 to 1824, also in ’38 and ’39. He transacted a great deal of legal business, drawing up papers, etc., although not a lawyer.” He was appointed Coroner of Orange County in 1798. Issue (all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church):
      1. Abraham Dickerson Soper, of New York City and afterward of Sisterville, Tyler Co., West Virgina, born 4 September 1795 (not 1796 as stated in some records), and baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (but the date is not stated in the record), died 25 March 1876. He was a lawyer, first postmaster of Milton, N.Y. (1823-), first judge of Ulster Co. (1828-), and a member of the New York Legislative Assembly. He moved to West Virginia about 1847, and was a member of the 1st Constitutional Convention of 1861-62. At the time of his death he was presiding justice of Tyler and adjoining counties. While still a resident of Milton, Ulster Co., he married 11 July 1821 at Poughkeepsie “by the Rev. Dr. Milledoler,”[164] Julia Ann Hanford, daughter of Lewis Hanford, of New York City, by his wife Dorothy Drake. Their line is continued in Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, 7:623-4.
      2. Anna Soper, born 19 December 1796, date of baptism not given in record; probably died young.
      3. Nancy Mary Soper, born 6 September 1799, baptized as “Mary” (date not given in record). She was sometime Postmistress of Milton. She married ____ Hanford, “and went to New York, afterwards to Ohio, where she died.”
      4. William Soper, born 13 June 1802, date of baptism not given in record. He was a lawyer, and sometime Postmaster of Milton, who later went to Wisconsin.
      5. Emma Soper, baptized 30 March 1806 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church (IGI); married Curtis Woolsey Northrip, son of Zephaniah Northrip, of Milton, by the latter’s wife Esther Ann (“Nancy”), daughter of Josiah Merritt.[165] According to the town history, “He farmed in his younger days, and then went to New York city for nineteen years, returning to Milton in 1846, and taking up farming again.” This statement is supported by the appearance of a Curtis W. Northrip in Ward 9 of New York City in the 1830 census. He and his wife had a son, C.S. Northrip, who “resides about one mile south of Milton village, and follows fruit farming. He served one term as justice of the peace, and is a trustee of the Presbyterian church.” Their descendants probably survive in the area. In the 1980s, “the generous donation of the Northrip house by Mrs. Herman Traebold in memory of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Northrip,” led to the creation of a Sunday School for Milton Methodist Church.[166]
      6. Charlotte Ann Soper, baptized 22 August 1808 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church (IGI); married Nathaniel Clark, “lived in Milton, and is buried there.” Her husband is possibly identical with the Nathaniel Clark “who came from Cornwall in 1817, and purchased the old homestead, on Farmer’s turnpike, still in possession of the family,” and was father of J. Oscar Clark, who was father of George S. Clark, of Milton.[167]
    4. Adam Dickerson, of Montgomery, born 28 February 1779, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church but with the date unrecorded, presumably the one of this name whose death on 9 September 1829 is recorded in the church register, but with no age stated. He married 28 June 1798, Jane Houston, born 1783, died 18 (?) February 1837, daughter of James Houston, of Montgomery, by his wife Anna Carr,[168] and granddaugher of the Rev. Joseph Houston. Issue (the Montgomery Dutch Church baptismal records of this periods giving dates of birth, not of baptism):
      1. Johannes Miller Dickerson, born ____; married 21 February 1823 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Catherine Crawford, who is possibly the “widow Cathrine Dickerson” whse death on 8 May 1855, at an unstated, is record in the register of the same church. Known issue:
        1. Francis Crawford Dickerson, born 7 November 1823, and baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
        2. Sarah Jane Dickerson, born 26 February 1825, and baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
      2. Ann Dickerson, born ____. She married before 1821, John B. Bodine. She transferred out of the Montgomery Dutch Church on 4 March 1852. Known issue (all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church):
        1. Adam Dickerson Bodine, born 15 January 1821.
        2. Mary Ellen Bodine, born 27 September 1822.
        3. Harriett Bodine, born 5 January 1825.
        4. Jane Bodine, born 18 October 1827.
        5. Susan Bodine, born 8 March 1830.
        6. Sarah Elizabeth Bodine, born 21 August 1832.
        7. Ellen Trumble Bodine, born 25 May 1835.
        8. Ann Mary Decker Bodine, born 22 August 1837.
        9. Hiley Terbell Bodine, born 13 August 1839.
        10. Henrietta Bodine, born 16 July 1841.
      3. Maria Dickerson, born 25 October 1804. She married 30 December 1819 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Joseph Hasbrouck Decker, of Montgomery, baptized 12 May 1800 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, son of Cornelius Decker and Hannah Duryea, and had issue:[169]
        1. Hannah Jane Decker, born 30 September 1821, and baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
        2. Harriet A. Decker.
        3. Francis C. Decker, born 1830.
        4. Joseph Hasbrook Decker, born 6 August 1839, and baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
        5. Anna Mary Decker, born 1842.
        6. Cornelius Decker.
      4. Harriet Dickerson, born ____; married 27 October 1824 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Francis Crawford. This couple does not appear to have baptized any children in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
      5. Abraham Dickerson, born 15 June 1809, and baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church. He married Ann Goodjion. This couple does not appear to have baptized any children in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
      6. Sarah Jane Dickerson, born 5 September 1811, and baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church. She married 18 December 1834 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Alanson Youngblood. Known issue (all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church):
        1. Sarah Ellen Youngblood, born 4 May 1836.
        2. Eveline Youngblood, born 17 December 1839.
        3. Hannah Jane Decker Youngblood, born 24 October 1841.
        4. Francis Dickerson Youngblood, born 18 November 1843.
        5. Lorenzo Youngblood, born 4 February 1847.
        6. John James Youngblood, born 10 April 1850.
      7. Catherine Dickerson, born 27 April 1814, and baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church. She married 12 September 1832 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, her third cousin, Alfred Weller (no. 4.iii.c.1.VII above), of Montgomery, born 16 June 1805, died 28 March 1872 at Hopewell, Crawford Tp., Orange Co., son of Henry Weller and Ann Kidd, q.v. for their issue.
      8. Eleanor Crawford Dickerson, born 2 June 1818, and baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church. She married Jacob Y. Shafer, whom we have not otherwise identified. Known issue (all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church):
        1. Eveline Shafer, born 5 June 1848.
        2. Ellen Jane Shafer, born 24 March 1850.
        3. Abby Ann Scott Shafer, born 29 December 1851.
        4. Mary Shafer, born 15 May 1854.
        5. Marriet [Harriet?] Maria Shafer, born 24 March 1856.
        6. Frances Jane Shafer, born 14 May 1859.
  2. 7Christoffel Maul (Mould), baptized 7 June 1748 with sponsors Christian Menges and his wife Maria Robertson.
  3. 8Johannes Maul (Mould), Jr., baptized 29 August 1756 with sponsors Johannis Krist, Jr., and Marutje Jongbloet.
  4. Eve Maul, baptized 4 February 1761 with sponors Johannis Nieppin and Eve Christ. She married 17 March 1779, Johannes/John Miller (III),[170] of Wallkill, Orange Co., born 1760, died 11/17 December 1834, son of Johannes/John Miller, Jr., of the same place, by his first wife, Esther Bull, daughter of William Bull,[171] of Hamptonburgh, Goshen Tp., Orange Co., and his wife Sarah Wells. Her husband was a step-son of her first cousin, Anna Juliana (Weller) Miller (no. 4.iii.b). He was one of the founders of the Montgomery Academy in 1791, and was sometime President of the Agricultural Society of Orange Co. According to the historian Eager, who knew him personally, gives a very long account of him which we have considerably abridged:
    The consequence of this unexpected death [of his father in 1774] was, that it deprived the family of its natural head and protector … and the care of the mother and children instantly devolved principally upon Johannes, the eldest son, then a mere lad. He was born in 1760, and … the duties of the father were performed by his son in a becoming and filial manner, alike beneficial to himself and the family generally….
        Mr. Johannes Miller was not liberally educated, but instructed only in the elementary department of a slight English education. Indeed, when he ought to have been at school, he was industriously laboring to support his mother and sisters; or on duty as a militia man guarding the frontiers against the incursions of the Indians. The war continued from the time he was sixteen till he was past the age of twenty-one, and he had little opportunity to leave home for educational purposes. This deficiency of an early education he endeavored to supply by after reading and observation. For a short period after he was fifteen years of age, he was boarded out at the old stone house of William Bull in Hamptonburgh, where he attended a school taught by an Irishman, and learned reading, writing, arithmetic, surveying, etc.
        Soon after the commencement of the war, and when about sixteen or seventeen years of age, his brother-in-law, Hendrick Van Keuren of Montgomery, commanded a company of militia, in which he was orderly sergeant; and when it was called out into service went with it. Notwithstanding the troubled and hostile condition of the country, he had the moral courage to enter a service for life, and made Miss Eve Mould Mrs. Johannes Miller, on the 17th of March, 1779, and moved into the old stone house on the hill at the Walkill. Here he had the patriot satisfaction of entertaining a troop of horse at his expense a part of one winter for the benefit of the country, and of paying a continental tax of three hundred and fifty bushels of corn.
        In stature he was of medium height, strongly and firmly made; his frame muscular and compactly knit together, calculated for strength and endurance; his face open, manly and highly intelligent — of sanguine temperament, with blue eyes deeply set in his head. He was of that general appearance and outline which indicated strength of body and mind, with firmness and determination….
        Soon after the War closed his neighbor Johannes Smith proposed to sell his farm of 125 acres, which adjoined him on the north, at ten dollars per acre. Miller … issued twenty notes of £25 each, payable at different periods, without interest till due, which Smith received, finding he could pay for a farm in Shawangunk with them….
        Feeling the deprivation of a good early education, he resolved to remedy the defect, and became an extensive reader on the subjects of theoretic and practical agriculture, and no farmer in the county had a more extensive library. Ambitious in this, he was no less so in becoming a politician, and his reading extended to that and kindred objects, and he settled down firmly in the school of Washington. He was early known as a Federalist, and so continued till his party was dissolved by the forty thieves, when he become a Whig, and so continued till he died….
        This gentleman was very friendly to the manufacturing interest of the country and internal improvement by roads and canals, and we believe his friendship and the hostility of government cost him many thousands of dollars….     In 1801 he was very active in procuring the charter for the Newburgh and Cochecton turnpike, and afterwards in procuring the stock to be taken and the road built. For years he was the soul and body of the company. This charter was among the earliest and most important granted in the State…. In these laudable enterprises he spent much time and money, and came out of the concerns with an injured estate. The road was sixty miles long; a large portion through a new and mountainous district of country, and covered with a poor and sparse population. The people generally, throughout the whole extent of the road, were hostile, and would not consent to pay toll to travel a public highway. The gates were evaded and pulled down at certain localities as fast and often as erected…. For several years the company were continually at law with some one, the expenses of which ate up the small receipts of the road, and no dividends were declared for many years…. The road, however, was a blessing to all except the first stockholders….
        Though himself not an educated man, this individual was a patron of learning as far as a liberal appropriation of means could accomplish it…. In 1791, with many others, he was instrumental in founding the Montgomery Academy, then but five in the State…. The old academy, originally constructed of slight materials …, in process of time, became worn out and unfit for the purposes intended, and the trustees judged it prudential to replace it by a new one…. At this time (1817) the State was commuting the quit-rents when the inhabitants of the patents asked for it. Mr. Miller, knowing they remained uncommuted on two or three patents in the county…, suggested the propriety of asking the legislature to grant them for the erection of a new academy…. The application was made and a law was passed in their favor, which cancelled the last patents in this county from all future payment of quit rents, and was the means of building the Montgomery Academy. This grant amounted to $2,000, and the trustees undertook to raise $1,500 by subscription, which they accomplished….
        In our notice we must not omit to state that our subject was a practical farmer, and in his neighborhood did all that he could to advance that interest by testing various agricultural theories. His lands were among the most beautiful in the county, and laid on both sides of the road leading to Goshen, between the village of Montgomery and theWalkill. This gentleman was an early friend of agriculture, arts and manufactures; for by looking into the old act, passed 1793, incorporating the Society instituted for the State of New York “for the promotion of agriculture, arts and manufactures,” he was one of the petitioners asking for the act of incorporation…. This was the earliest attempt made in this State by individuals to promote the subjects above mentioned….
        Mr. Miller was the last president of the Agricultural Society of Orange formed in 1818….
        When asked and advised to share in the late, but well-earned bounties of his country, for military services performed in the militia during the war, he refused, and would not apply for a pension, on the ground that he was young when the services were rendered, the dangers and hardships of which were now unfelt and forgotten…. In this connection it is proper to remark that the venerable and aged widow and relict of Mr. Miller, by the persuasion of friends, is now in the receipt of her husband’s revolutionary services, as they are meted out to her by the country.
        Though brought up in the Lutheran church, of all Christian denominations Mr. Miller preferred the Presbyterian as most republican and independent. Among his fellow citizens, whether in or out of a church connection, no one gave a more cheerful or bountiful support to its institutions. The Sabbath found him regularly in attendance at the house of God. It was his pride and pleasure to provide for the temporal wants of the church and minister, for whom his purse and personal exertions were ever ready at their call….
        In this respect his lady was the true exponent of himself, and through a long matrimonial life — longer than usually falls to mortals — she was in reality a crown to her lord. Her virtues were not of that showy character which seek applause, and self gratification the ruling principle, but shown most conspicuously in her own domain, the domestic circle — where, though quiet and unobtrusive, all admitted she was the presiding goddess.
        This charitable feeling and good will manifested itself in the most agreeable manner to the children in the vicinity. His carriage, winter and summer, went as regularly down to the village as if it had been a daily stage in the employ of government. On these occasions, his vehicle would be crowded with the school childen, thick as they could set or stand, and appeared as if a swarm of bees had settled upon it, all teeming with life and animation. He thus literally took them up and carried them in his arms….
        Mr. Miller, by the request of friends and neighbors, was appointed to lay the corner stone of the First Presbyterian Church in the village of Montgomery….
        Mr. Miller died December 17, 1834, aged seventy-four. He had but two children who grew up to age, John and Maria.
        Issue (apart from others who died young):

    1. John Miller (IV); married ____ Oliver, daughter of Judge Oliver, of Marbletown, Ulster Co.
    2. Maria Miller, married David Hunter, said to have been of “Bloomingburgh” (recte Blooming-Grove?), Orange Co. We are not certain whether he was the same as David Hunter “of this county [i.e. Orange],” father of Elizabeth Hunter, died 1868, who married (as his first wife), William H. Hallock, of Washingtonville, Orange Co., and had issue.[172] In any case, this couple is known to have had a son:
      1. Johannes Miller Hunter, born 21 March 1817 in Montgomery Tp., died 10 August 1889. He married 6 February 1839, his kinswoman, Cecelia B. Bull, born 21 November 1811, died 30 November 1892, daughter of Henry Bull and Jane Stitt, and granddaughter of Daniel Bull and Catharine Miller (no. 4.iii.b.1). They moved to Waukesa, Wisconsin, in 1856, and later to East Troy, in the same state. He was a farmer who supplied butter to Milwaukee.[173]

6.   Philipp3 Maul, of Montgomery, later of Shawangunk, Ulster Co., N.Y., son of Christoffel Maul and Anna Juliana Sergius, was baptized 12 October 1722 in ____ Church, and was still alive in May 1775. He married by 1751, Susanna Hui,[174] alive in 1774, probably a daughter of Robert Huey, of Montgomery and Wallkill, Orange, NY, by the latter’s wife Anna Ursula Nieuwkerk.[175] Robert Huey of Wallkill left a will dated 8 February 1742/3, and proved 4 May 1744, in which he names only his youngest daughter Margaret, but mentions having three daughters.[176] It will be noted that Philip Maul and Susanna Huey named a son Robert. Philip Maul was received as a communicant in the Montgomery Dutch Church on 8 May 1739. From the baptismal records of his children, it may be inferred that he was in Montgomery between 1751 and 1757, in Shawangunk between 1763 and 1768, and back in Mongomery in 1771. On 9 May 1775, he was a member of the Committee of Safety for Hanover Precinct (later Montgomery Tp.).
    Known issue:[177]

  1. Anna Maul, baptized 15 October 1751 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, with sponsors John Philipus Spies and Antje Hui. She may possibly have married[178] Frederick Rosenkrans, baptized 4 November 1746 at Marbletown, son of Harmanus Rosenkrans and Antjen Schoonmaker, and brother of Hendrick Rosenkrans who married Anna’s sister Susanna Maul. Although they had not known children of their own, they appear together as baptismal sponsors at Marbletown both for Fredrick, baptized 9 September 1787, son of Robert Moul and Aplonie Oosterhout (sponsors Fredrick Rosekrans and Ann Moul), and Antje, baptized 7 October 1793, daughter of Harmanus Oosterhoudt and Catherina Kroom (sponsors Fred’k Roosakrans; Antje Mowl).[179]
  2. Catharina Maul, baptized 24 October 1754 in the Montgomery Dutch Church with sponsors Adam Nieukirk and Lydia Deckker. She married (1?) before 1777, Isaac Roosa. She was probably also identical with the Catharine Mould, born (by calculation) ca. 17 October 1754, died 19 January 1809, “aged 54 years, 3 months, 2 days,” who married 4 September 1803 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, Christoffel Mould (no. 8), of Montgomery Tp., but we cannot be quite sure of this as the record does not call the bride a widow. In any case, Catharina Moul was mother, by Isaac Roosa, of:
    1. Philip Roosa, baptized 27 April 1777 at Shawangunk.
    2. Phillip Roosa, baptized 7 March 1779 at Shawangunk.
    3. John Roosa, baptized 17 June 1781 at Shawangunk. Pamela J. Sears points out that he is presumably the one of this name who appears in Sullivan Co., NY, as the husband of Dolly Duryea, daughter of Joost Duryea and Hannah Hudson of Orange Co.
    4. Jacob Roosa, baptized 7 December 1783 in the Montgomery Dutch Church (no sponsors named in record); possibly married Susanna Rosenkrans.
  3. Robert Maul, baptized 27 August 1757 in the Montgomery Dutch Church,[180] with sponsors Jacob Nieukirk, and Magdalene Gemberg, wife of Adem Nieukirk. We very much doubt the statement in Mackenzie says he married Jane Stewart, as his younger brother James most certainly had a wife of this name. It is more plausible, as suggested to us by Pamela J. Sears, that he married Apolonia Osterhoudt of Marbletown, born 16 Oct 1765 at Rochester, daughter of Martynus Osterhoudt and Catrina Hoffman. If so, he had the following issue:
    1. (perhaps) Philip Maul, born ca. 1782 at Marbletown.
    2. Fredrick Maul, baptized 9 September 1787 with sponsors Fredrick Rosekrans and Ann Moul. This Frederick Maul may have married (1) Sally Trombauer; (2nd) Catherine Smith, baptized 25 May 1793 at Marbletown., daughter of Hendricus Smit and Margaret Nottingham.
    3. (probably) Sarah Maul, born ca. 1792; married Benjamin Bush, of Marbletown.
    4. Mary Anne Maul, born 27 Jan 1795, baptized 1795.
    5. Catrina Maul, born 15 September 1797, baptized 1 October 1797.
    6. (probably) Leah Maul, born ca. 1800; married John H. Smith, of Marbletown, baptized 29 August 1797, brother of Catherine Smith above.
    7. Jennie Maul, bapt 27 March 1803 at Shawangunk.
    8. Jemima Rosenkrans Maul, born 9 December 1805, bapt 26 January 1806 at New Paltz.
  4. Susannah Maul, baptized 16 April 1760 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church. She is presumably the Susannah Moul who married 31 January 1779 in the same church, Henricus Rosenkrans.
  5. James Maul, baptized 8 January 1761 [in the Shawangunk Dutch Church?], died young.
  6. Philipp Maul, baptized 1763 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church. Pamela J. Sears suggests that this Philip Maul married Antje Alleger of Marbletown, baptized there 24 May 1767, daughter of Benjamin Alleger and Sarah Rosenkrans (sister of Hendrick and Frederick Rosenkrans above). Philip Maul and Antje Alleger had four children baptized at Marbletown.
  7. Maria Maul, baptized 20 September 1765 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church.
  8. Leah Maul, baptized 7 August 1768 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, died 25 March 1821 at Shawangunk. She married (as his second wife) Tjerck van Keuren, baptized 30 May 1762 at Shawangunk, died 1810 at Shawangunk, widower of Leah Roosa, and son of Jacobus van Keuren and Leah Hoogteeling.[181] Her husband was a farmer and later in life he is believed to have been an innkeeper. According to a Van Keuren family history, “Lieutenant Tjerck Van Keuren … of Shawangunk, Ulster County, served throughout the war in Colonel Albert Pawling’s Levies and spent much time on the western frontier along what is now the border of Ulster and Sullivan Counties.”[182] Known issue:[183]
    1. Philip Van Keuren, born 1 August 1791, baptized 17 November 1791 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church; married Mary Ann Moore, and had issue.
    2. Alexander Van Keuren, born 23 October 1794; died 21 December 1794.
    3. Elijah Van Keuren, born 12 April 1796, baptized 17 November 1796, died 1874; married Rosanna Upright.
    4. Charles V. Van Keuren, born 29 October 1798; baptized 17 November 1798, died 1880; married Charlotte Rainey, and had issue.
    5. Matthew F. Van Keuren, born 10 August 1801 at Shawangunk, baptized 20 August 1801; married Elsie Van Amburgh, and had issue.
    6. Perina Van Keuren, born 24 December 1803, died 10 April 1886, and buried in Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, in the Miller family plot (lot 1132, section 60). According to Pamela J. Sears, Penina Van Keuren never married, and lived at Brooklyn with her sister Susan Elizabeth Van Keuren and husband Hiram Miller (see below. In the 1850 census she is apparently recorded as “Penina.”
    7. Susan Elizabeth Van Keuren, born 6 April 1806 at Shawangunk, died 11 September 1882, and both buried with her husband in Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn. She married (as his second wife) 3 December 1836 at New Prospect, Orange, New York, Hiram Miller, born 30 October 1795 (not 3 October 1799 as stated in the family bible) in Orange County, New York, baptized 26 June 1796 in the First Presbyterian Church at Goshen, died 1 July 1880, widower of Maria Brink,[184] and son of William Miller and Annatje Van Keuren. Hiram Miller and his family appear in the 1850 census, living in Brooklyn, Kings, NY at no. 5 Middagh Street.[185] They appear at the same location in 1860, 1870, and 1880. The 1850 records Hiram Miller as being of no occupation. Pamela J. Sears notes: “How Hiram Miller acquired his money is unknown, but he appeared to be involved in real estate, and had considerable real and personal property (1860 and 1870 census returns).” Hiram Miller and Susan Elizabeth Van Keuren had three sons: Cornelius, George, and Jared. According to Pamela J. Sears, a great-great-granddaughter, the Miller family bible, kept by his son Jared Milles, lists the three sons for Hiram Miller and Susan Elizabeth Van Keuren, but gives the dates only for Jared himself. Issue (order partly inferential):
      1. Cornelius Miller, born 1828-29 (aged 21 in 1850); still living unmarried with his parents in 1850, when he was an accountant.
      2. George Miller, born apparently in 1831-37, who could not have been older than Cornelius but had died or left his parents’s household by 1850. Pamela J. Sears notes that a George Miller is buried in the Miller family plot at Green-Wood Cemetery, having died shortly before 19 Jul 1849 at Brooklyn, the death record giving his name as George W. Miller. However, she believes him to be an unrecorded brother of Hiram Miller, and not his son. The Miller family bible notes the marriage of a George Miller and Hannah Garrison on 4 May 1827, which matches the record of their marriage on that date by the Rev. Wm. Murray at Market Street Dutch Reformed Church, New York City, which would make the groom an exact contemporary of Hiram Miller.
      3. Jared Miller, born 20 Jun 1839 (per his bible record), presumably in Orange County. He married 25 December 1860 by the Reverend James M. Freeman at Port Richmond, State Island,[186] Elizabeth Vreeland Cadmus, of Staten Island, born there 27 September 1842 (per a Cadmus family bible record), daughter of Jasper G. Cadmus and Lavinia Van Pelt. They are the great-grandparents of Pamela J. Sears.
  9. James Maul (or Mould or Moule), baptized 8 June 1771 in the Montgomery Dutch Church (no sponsors named in record), died 18 January 1850, aged 78 years, 9 months, and 7 days, and buried with his wife and several children in the New Prospect Reformed Dutch Church Ground, Shawangunk, Ulster Co.[187] His tombstone gives his surnames as Moule. He married 13 December 1796 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, Jane Stewart, born (by calculation) ca. 7 October 1777, died 7 August 1833, aged 55 years and 10 months. Known issue, all baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (the records giving dates of birth rather than of the baptism):
    1. Philip Stewart Mould, born 6 August 1797, died 21 February 1829, aged 31 years, 6 months, and 17 days, and buried with his parents.
    2. Harvey Mould, born 6 January 1799, died 16 August 1816, aged 17 years, 7 months, and 10 days, and buried with this parents.
    3. Eliza Mould, born 27 July 1801.
    4. Henry Mould, born 13 April 1804, died 18 April 1887, and buried with his parents. He married 15 January 1829 in Hopewell Presbyterian Church, Crawford, Emily Ann Weller, born 2 September 1806, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 30 November 1879, aged 73 years, 2 months, and 28 days, who is buried with him; daughter of Hieronimus Weller and Catherine Tice. For further details see the Weller genealogy, p. 104.
    5. John Mould, born 26 June 1808.
  10. Henry Maul, born 25 April 1774, baptized 24 May 1774 in the Montgomery Dutch Church (no sponsors named in record). A Henry Mowl married 14 February 1796 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, Gertrude Vanderlyn.

7.   Christoffel4 Mould,[188] of Montgomery Tp., Orange Co., son of Johannes Maul and Maria Catharina Menges, was baptized 7 June 1748 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, and died 18 April 1813 at Montgomery, and buried with his two wives in the Dutch churchyard.[189] He married (1) 23 March 1773 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, his sister-in-law, Rubina Dickerson (called “Ruaner” on her tombstone, and “Rowanna“ in an old county history), born ca. 22 March 1753, died 2 February 1803, “aged 49 years, 10 months, 10 days,” sister of his sister Anna’s husband Abraham Dickerson, and daughter of William Dickerson, of Southold, Suffolk Co., Long Island, by his wife Dorothy Cory.[190] He married (2) 4 September 1803 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, Catharine Mould, born (by calculation) ca. 17 October 1754, died 19 January 1809, “aged 54 years, 3 months, 2 days,” and by whom he does not appear to have had any issue.[191] She was probably his first cousin, Catharina Maul, baptized 24 October 1754 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, daughter of Philipp Maul (no. 7) and Susanna Hui.
    According to his tombstone, he served in the 2nd Regiment of Ulster County Militia, and Mackenzie says this was Colonel McClanghry’s Regiment.
    A brief listing of his issue in Ruttenber & Clark, History of Orange County, p. 411, mentions only “John C., Philip, Catharine, Anna, Mary, and ____,” which seems to suggest that only six of his children reached adulthood, but counting the daughters Eleanor and Elizabeth, both of whom certainly did so, there were in fact at least seven.
    Known issue, all by first wife (all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church):

  1. Johannes Mould, born 10 April 1774, baptized 15 May 1774 with sponsors “Johannes Moul and wife”; died young.
  2. Eleanora Mould, born 5 September 1775, baptized 8 October following (without sponsors), died 5 January 1861. She married 23 November 1797 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, The Rev. Samuel Pelton, born 28 March 1776 at Montgomery, Orange Co., died 10 July 1864 at Monticello, Sullivan Co., N.Y., son of Gideon Pelton, who came from near Gale’s Ferry, Groton (now Ledyard, New London Co.), Conn., to Hopewell, Orange Co., N.Y., and married firstly, Margaret Crawford, of that place.[192] According to the 1892 Pelton genealogy, her husband received his early education at Montgomery Academy, and subsequently trained for the ministry. He was installed pastor of the churches of Hempstead (later Ramapo), and Haverstraw, both in Rockland Co., N.Y., on 20 February 1817, “and held that charge until an attack of paralysis compelled him, as advised by his physician, to retire from active service in 1840.” He retired, to live with his son, Luther, at Monticello, N.Y., where he partially recovered his health and preached occasionally until his death. “He was uncommonly social, hopeful, cheerful and agreeable, with great powers for attracting the young and gaining the confidence of all. He was the author of one or two works, one being on the baptismal controversy. He was a ready debater and a strong controversialist.” Issue (apart from two children who died in infancy, names unknown):
    1. Christopher Mould Pelton, baptized 12 May 1798 in Goodwill Presbyterian Church, the record calling him “Christopher Mole, son of Samuel and Catherine [sic] Pelton. According to the Pelton geneealogy, he “was educated for a profession, left home when about twenty years of age, went to Cincinnati, Ohio, and there died, aged 28 years, unmarried, about 1826.”
    2. Mary Ann Pelton, born 9 March 1800, baptized 13 April following in the Goodwill Presbyterian Church, died 4 June 1864 at Monticello, N.Y. She married 22 August 1827, Orrin Royce, of Monticello, died November 1875, son of Uzziel Royce, of Connecticut.
    3. Alexander Crawford Pelton, born 9 October 1802, baptized 2 January 1803 in the Goodwill Presbyterian Church. He married 24 October 1824, Rhoda Ann Rumsey.
    4. Margaret Ruama Pelton, born 11 July 1805, died s.p. 11 October 1837 at New York City. She married 15 October 1835, Alexander Buchanan, son of James Buchanan, of Ireland and New York City.
    5. Jacintha Pelton, born 10 November 1807, died s.p. 5 February 1865 at Monticello, N.Y. She married in 1850, Joseph Lounsbury, of Monticello, son of Ethiel Lounsbury, of Connecticut.
    6. Gideon Pelton, born 25 November 1810; died ca. 1831 in western New York, aged 21 years. “He had taken a trip to the West, and died on his return journey.”
    7. Sarah C. Pelton, born 13 November 1812 at Monticello, N.Y. She married 15 May 1834 at Hempstead (now Ramapo), Rockland Co., N.Y., Aaron Blauvelt, born 4 October 1807, son of Col. Cornelius A. Blauvelt. They were living in 1880 near Sufferns, Rockland Co., N.Y., where her husband was a farmer. They had eleven children.
    8. Luther Pelton, born 26 June 1819, at Haverstraw, N.Y. He married (1) 6 November 1842, Ruth E. Decker; (2) 28 March 1860, Susan M. Young. By his first wife, his issue included Patience Pelton (1843-1916), who married in 1866, Timothy Benjamin5 Comfort (1831-1899) (Benjamin Jr.4, Benjamin3, Robert2, Robert1), of Monticello, farmer, and had issue.[193]
  3. Wilhelm Mould, born 7 June 1777, baptized 29 June following (no sponsors named in record), probably died young.
  4. Maria Mould, born 25 October 1778 (no sponsors named in record), died 17 November 1838, and 60 years and 1 month, and buried with her husband and his other wife in the Montgomery Dutch churchard. She married 23 November 1802 in the Dutch Church of Shawangunk, Adam Bookstaver, born 12 January 1779, baptized 28 February following in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 25 August 1858, son of Wilhelmus Bookstaver and Maria Sinsenbach. Adam Bookstaver’s other wife Elizabeth, born 26 July 178_, died ____, is also buried with them, but in the absence of a death date for her we cannot tell whether she was his first or his second wife. Mary Mould is called Polly in their marriage record but Mary in the baptismal records of their children. Known issue, all baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (the register giving the dates of birth, not of baptism):
    1. Marcus Bookstaver, born 16 May 1804, died 5 February 1835, aged 28 years, 8 months, and 19 days, and buried with his parents.
    2. Norfilly or Horfilly (?) Bookstaver, born 17 December 1805.
    3. Milton Bookstaver, born 29 March 1808. He married 11 December 1839 in the Montgomery Dutch Church (both parties being then of Crawford), Margaret Smith. She transferred out of the church on 5 August 1844.
    4. Catherine Ann Bookstaver, born 27 April 1813.
    5. John Bookstaver, born 7 February 1816.
    6. Mary Bookstaver, born 14 March 1818.
    7. David Bookstaver, born 3 January 1821.
    8. Alonzo Bookstaver, born 7 January 1811.
  5. Elizabeth Mould, born ca. 31 March 1781, baptized 13 May following (no sponsors named in record), died 12 September 1841, “aged 61 years, 5 months, 12 days,” and buried with her husband.[194] She married 21 April 1803 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, her first cousin, Jonathan Mould (no. 12), born 1782, died 1855, q.v., son of Johannes Maul, Jr., by whom she had issue.
  6. 9Johannes C. Mould, born ca. 25 February 1783, baptized 3 March following, no sponsors being named in the record.
  7. 10Philip Mould, born 28 June 1785, baptized 7 July following, no sponsors being named in the record.
  8. Eve Mould, born 16 September 1787 (per her baptismal record), baptized 16 September following (no sponsors named in record), died (unmarried) 28 February 1801, “aged 14 years, 6 months, 25 days” (her age at death having been seemingly miscalculated) and buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard.
  9. Anna Mould, born 10 November 1789, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church but date (and the names of any sponsors) omitted from record, died 28 May 1871, and buried in the Montgomery Dutch Churchyard, her tombstone calling her the widow of Joseph Decker. She married 2 September 1815 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, Joseph Decker, of Montgomery, born 13 November 1785, died 16 February 1866, and buried in the same place, and had the following issue, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (the register giving the dates of birth rather than of baptism):
    1. John Joseph Decker, born 25 August 1816.
    2. Elizabeth Decker, born 21 November 1817.
    3. Ruanna Decker, born 11 November 1820, died 27 August 1890.[195] She married 1 January 1840, John A. Crawford, of Montgomery, and had issue.
    4. Abner Decker, born 19 December 1822 (his tombstone says 1823), died 6 April 1885, and buried with his parents.
    5. Martha Decker, born 23 August 1825.
    6. Mary Decker, born 27 October 1828.
    7. James Decker, born 25 February 1831, died 1 November 1889, and buried with his parents.
  10. Catharina (“Catje”) Mould, born 2 February 1792, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church but date (and the names of any sponsors) omitted from record. Two incompatible possibilities present themselves respecting this child, and we cannot determine which is more likely: (A) She was the Catherine Mould who joined the Montgomery Dutch church in October 1813, died [unmarried] 22 February 1883, “aged 92 years,” and was buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard, who would appear on the basis of notes made by Marshall Pierson to have been the spinster Catharina Mould who lived with Ruanna (Mould) Ashby (no. 12.i below), who would thus have been a grand-niece; or (B) she was the wife of Abraham Weller (see the list of “Unplaced Persons&rsduo; at the end of these notes).

8.   Johannes4 Mould, Jr., of Montgomery, son of Johannes Maul and Maria Catharina Menges, was born ca. 28 August 1756, baptized 29 August following in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died (testate) 24 April 1813 at Montgomery, “aged 56 years, 7 months, 26 days,” and buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard.[196] He married 8 May 1777 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Maria Louw, born ca. 13 May 1756, died one day after her husband on 25 April 1813, “aged 56 years, 11 months, 12 days,” and buried with her husband, daughter of Jonathan Louw by his wife Geertjen van Wagenen.
    He served as a private in the 2nd (Mackenzie) or 8th (tombstone), Regiment of Militia in Ulster County (Mackenzie says “in Colonel McClanghry’s Regiment”) during the Revolutionary War.[197]
    His will, dated 22 April 1813 and proved 10 May following, “Johannes Mould of the Town of Montgomery in the County of Orange … weak in body but of sound and perfect mind and memory,” gives a somewhat unclear account of the testator’s properties, stating that “all the … lots of land except what is bequeathed unto my son Christopher is [sic] situated … on the east side of Shawangunk Mountain.” He leaves to his son Jonathan the farm on which he now lives and most of the personal property, and it is not clear whether this is the same property as the lots nos. 6 and 7 “purchased of David Terwilliger” which are left to him in a later clause. He leaves to his son Christopher the farm on he now lives (sic) and some of the movable property, and likewise it is not clear whether this is the same property as the lot 7 “purchased of David Terwilliger” which is left to him in a later clause but with the stipulation that he deed it to John or forfeit the sum of $3700. Christopher is to assume the expense of the testator’s share in the support of “the Negro woman Silvy,” presumably an old family slave. He leaves to his son Abraham the house, lot, and tan-yards purchased of William Hunter Junr. He leaves to his daughter Magdalane the personal property she has already received, together with lot no. 4 containing 160 acres, purchased from Daniel Terwilliger. He leaves to his daughter Mary the personal property she has already received, and lot no. 5, containing 163 acres, purchased of John Christ Tice. (These references strongly imply that these two daughters are married, but do not supply their married surnames.) He leaves to his unmarried minor daughter Catharine lot no. 3, containing 163 acres, purchased of John Christ Tice and Daniel Terwilliger. His “beloved wife Mary” is to have the customary use of the estate during her widowhood, in lieu of dower. He appoints as executors his my sons Jonathan and Christopher, and “my beloved friend Adam Dickerson.” The witnesses are Joseph Bookstaver, Johannes C. Moul, and Jane Bookstaver.[198]
    Issue (all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church; no sponsors named in any of the records):

  1. Abraham Mould, born 30 May 1778, baptized 28 June 1778, without sponsors, died by 1 October 1788, when another son was given the same name.
  2. Magdalena Mould, baptized 6 February 1780). As “Helena” Mould (a wrong guess on the part of a clerk, presumably as the two names share the diminutive Lena) she married 19 December 1799 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, David Mulford. They had issue.[199]
  3. 11Jonathan Mould, born ca. 24 January 1782, baptized 3 March following.
  4. Jacob Mould, baptized 5 June 1784, died before the making of his father’s will on 22 April 1813.
  5. Christopher Mould, born 15 March 1786, baptized 26 April following,[200] died (testate) 5 May 1813, “aged 27 years, 1 month, 21 days,” surviving his father by less than two weeks, and buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard, not adjacent to any other members of the Mould family. We are much indebted to Susanne (Embler) Devine for supplying the following account of him and his family. He married 26 March 1808 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, Catharine Felter, born ca. 17 July 1789 (calculated from age at death), died 7 June 1859, and buried with her second husband, Samuel McKinstry, in the Montgomery Dutch Churchyard. (She would subsequently married secondly, 13 August 1818 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Samuel McKinstry, and have five more children.[201]) In his will, dated 1 May 1813 and proved 3 June following, “Christopher Mould of the Town of Shawangunk in the County of Ulster … weak in body but of sound and perfect mind and memory” leaves his household goods to his “beloved wife Catherine,” with “the use of my farm lately bequeathed unto me by my father Johannes Mould in the County of Orange during her widowhood,” but stipulates that his brother Johannes shall become administrator of the property during his children’s minorities should she remarry. The only son yet born was Hiram, and his only daughter Susan, to whom he bequeaths $1250 on her majority or marriage. He mentions “ the child [with] which my wife is now pregnant,” who depending on its gender will either share the paternal inheritance with Hiram or receive a dowry like Susan’s. His brother John is to receive “that lott of land which I was directed to deed to him by my father’s will,” and $200 if he take possession of it. He appoints as executors Jonathan Mould, his wife Catherine, and Adam Dickerson. The witnesses are Esther Felter, John Impson (who attests with a mark), and Jane Bookstaver.[202] Issue, all baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (the records giving the dates of birth, not of baptism):
    1. Susannah Mould, born 26 January 1809; the only daughter alive at the making of her father’s will in May 1813. She was likely the Susan Mould who married 12 September 1826 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Henry Conger.
    2. Hiram Mould, born 9 February 1811; the only son alive at the making of his father’s will in May 1813.
    3. Christopher Mould, born (posthumously) 27 July 1813.
  6. Abraham Mould, born 1 October 1788, probably the Abraham Mould who married 12 January 1808 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, Susannah Hulslander. The county history by Ruttenber & Clark, under the heading of Pine Bush in Montgomery Tp., and apparently describing events of the 1830s, states: “There was a tannery west from Wheeler’s house, run by Abraham Mould from 1825, or about that date, and continued for a few years. Abraham Mould was afterwards killed by James Mitchell in an altercation. Mr. Mitchell was tried for the offense, but acquitted on the ground of justifiable homicide done in self-defense.”[203] The present man seems to be the only one of this name at this period. Known issue, all baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (the record giving the dates of births, not of baptisms):
    1. Julie Ann Mould, 21 October 1809.
    2. Catherine Mould, born 7 March 1812.
  7. Maria Mould, born 1 March 1791, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church but with no baptismal date recorded, died 7 August 1867, “aged 76 years, 4 months, 26 days,” and buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchard. She married 18 May 1811 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, Moses Rowe (Sr.), of Montgomery, born 22 (per baptismal record) or 28 (per tombstone) February 1790, likewise baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church but with no baptismal date recorded, died 13 April 1854, “aged 61 years, 1 month, 15 days,” and buried with his wife, son of Matthew Rowe and Margaret Risley (?).[204] Known issue, all baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (the records giving the dates of birth, not of baptism):[205]
    1. John Rowe, born 8 March 1812.
    2. Margaret Rowe, born 9 January 1814.
    3. Eve Ann Rowe, born 3 January 1815, died 1 February 1885, and buried with her husband in the New Prospect Reformed Dutch Church Ground, Shawangunk, Ulster Co. She married 11 April 1837 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, her second cousin, Daniel Southerland Mould, son of Philip Mould by the latter’s first wife, Eleanor Southerland. She transferred out of the Montgomery Dutch Church on 2 April 1838.
    4. David Rowe, born 20 April 1817, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (as a son of Moses Rouw and Mary “Mack,” if the entry has been read correctly), died 22 May 1882, aged 65 years and 1 month, and buried with his parents.
    5. Matthew Rowe, born 4 January 1819, died 16 January 1895, farmer. He married, and had eight children.[206]
    6. Mary Catharine Rowe, born 26 February 1821, who married her first cousin and second cousin, David Mould (no. 13), son of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Mould) Mould.
    7. Thomas Gomie Rowe, born 1 March 1823.
    8. Elizabeth Rowe, born 11 September 1826.
    9. Susan Conger Rowe, born 30 October 1828, died 29 March 1877, and buried with her parents.
    10. Eleanor Rowe, born 14 November 1831, died 17 November 1889, and buried with her parents.
  8. Johannes Mould, born 9 October 1794, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church but with no baptismal date recorded. In any earlier version of these notes we suggested that he was the John Mould who married 12 April 1815 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, Elmira Smith. It is now clear, however, that he must have died before the making of his father’s will on 22 April 1813.
  9. Catharine Menina Mould, born 3 October 1797, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church but with no baptismal date recorded, died 6 April 1874, and buried with her husband in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard. She married 3 June 1815 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, Daniel Embler, born 12 July 1794 at Montgomery, died 13 October 1847, brother of Adam Embler aforesaid, and a son of Andrew Embler and Mary Catherine Tiers. Known issue, all baptisms in the Montgomery Dutch Church (the register giving the date of birth, not of baptism):[207]
    1. Adam D. Embler, born 10 November 1816, died 20 March 1820.
    2. Ann Elmyra Embler, born 27 October 1818, died 22 September 1885. She joined the Montgomery Church in December 1840 as a single woman.
    3. Mary Jane Embler, born 22 April 1821, died 6 January 1889.
    4. William Embler, born 18 June 1823, died 21 September 1885 near Circleville, New York, aged 62 years, 3 months, and 3 days, and buried with his wife in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard. He married his first cousin once removed and second cousin once removed, Maria Ashby, born about 24 November 1827, died 1 September 1893, aged 65 years, 9 months, and 7 days, daughter of John M. Ashby and Ruanna Mould. They were the great-grandparents of Susanne (Embler) Devine. Known issue, all baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church:
      1. Ruanna Catherine (“Katie”) Embler, born 14 September 1851, baptized 21 September following, died 20 June 1877, aged 26 years, 8 months, and 6 days, and buried with her parents.
      2. Jonathan Mould Embler, born 8 February 1853, died 1 April 1912 at Colorado Springs, Colorado.
      3. Henry Wilson Embler, born 25 January 1857, died 4 January 1903 at Circleville, N.Y., and buried in the Embler Plot, Circleville Cemetery.
      4. Maria Louise Embler, born 17 September 1859, died 21 February 1943 at Newburgh, N.Y., and buried in St. Georges Cemetery, Newburgh.
      5. Dora Belle Embler, born 3 February 1862, died 30 June 1952 at Newburgh, N.Y., and buried at Bloomingburgh, N.Y.
      6. Charles William Embler, born 28 March 1865, died 1 May 1929 at Bloomingburgh, N.Y., and buried there.
    5. Lawrence Tears Embler, born 29 April 1825, died in 1885.
    6. Adrian Embler, born 12 May 1827.
    7. Catherine Amelia Embler, born 6 December 1830, died 12 October 1913 at Newburgh, N.Y.
    8. Hiram Mould Embler, born 18 August 1832, born 17 August 1932.
    9. Letty Amelia/Adelia Embler, born 10 March 1835, died 12 January 1899.
    10. Elizabeth Mould Embler, born 9 March 1837, died 14 March 1896.

9. Johannes C.5 Mould, of Montgomery, son of Christoffel Mould and Rubina Dickerson, was born ca. 25 February 1783, baptized 3 March following (no sponsors named in record), and died 1 March 1869, “aged 86 years, 6 days.” He married 17 June 1815 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Mary Shafer, of Montgomery, born ca. 2 June 1798, died 29 January 1861, “aged 62 years, 7 months, 27 days,” daughter of Daniel Shaer and Catharine Weller.[208] They are buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard. Issue:[209]

  1. Christopher J. Mould, born 16 May 1816, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 24 May 1881 of hydrophobia, resulting from a bite which he had received nine months previous. According to the county history by Ruttenber & Clark, “He remained with his parents during his boyhood, attended the neighboring school at intervals of rest from labor upon the farm, and in various ways rendered his presence invaluable to the family. Christopher J. Mould (1816-1881) At the age of thirty he became ambitious to secure a home for himself, and removed to the estate which is now the family residence…. Mr. Mould, though unassuming in manner, and having but little ambition for the honors which accompany public life, was nevertheless a man of much influence in the community. His efforts were ever directed in the cause of humanity, and all beneficent measures found in him an earnest co-operator. He was a sturdy Republican in politics, and although popular with his party, accepted no official preferment from its representatives. The cause of temperance found in him a fearless advocate, both in his official relations as excise commissioner and in private life. In religion he espoused the creed of the Reformed Dutch Church, of which he had in former years been an exemplary elder.” He was one of three men appointed by the consistory of the Montgomery Dutch Church to supervise the construction of a new building in 1860, and one of two appointed in 1871 to supervise some renovations; it was afterwards remarked that “the confidence placed in the taste of the committee was richly justified in the result as we witness it to-day.”[210] He also left a legacy to cover the costs of further improvements.[211] In an address delivered in 1882, a former minister, the Rev. Cornelius Brett, wrote: “When last I stood in this place, the Church was thronged even as to-day while the noble form of Christopher J. Mould lay waiting for burial. In the experience of four congregations, I have never met a grander specimen of earnest manly piety. He was ready in every emergency to help forward every good work. He was known as the preacher’s friend, and the man who carried his heart in his hand and the Church in his heart.” Christopher J. Mould married 14 December 1845, his kinswoman, Martha Bull, born in april 1825 (per the 1900 census), alive in 1900, daughter of Milton Bull, of Crawford, Orange Co., by the latter’s wife Esther Crawford, and granddaughter of Daniel Bull and Catharine Miller (no. 4.iii.b.1). “Martha Bull, wife of Christopher J. Mould” joined the Montgomery Dutch church in March 1847, and Christopher himself followed in December 1848. The widow Martha Mould appears as the head of a household, including her daughters Martha and Lemma, in the 1900 census of “Montgomery Township excluding Montgomery Village,” in which she is called a farmer.[212] Christopher Mould and his wife had three daughters:[213]
    1. Mary Esther Mould, born 10 September 1846, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 3 September 1874, and buried with her husband in Montgomery New Cemetery. She married by 1872, Abner M. Fulton, of Monticello, N.Y., born 20 March 1843, died 16 December 1922. Only known child:
      1. Albert M. Fulton, born 1872.
    2. Lemma Mould, born 25 July 1860, died 22 February 1929. She married 14 March 1883 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, William Francis Draper, born 18 February 1852 at Wrentham, Mass., died 11 October 1933, son of William Henry Draper and Charlotte Ide.[214] At the time of the marriage the groom was residing at Attleborough, Massachusetts, and the bride in Montgomery township. They are found in her mother’s household in the 1900 census of Montgomery Township, in which her husband is called a farm-laborer. Only known child:
      1. William Bradford Draper, born 26 November 1883.
    3. Martha Mould, born 14 March 1870, died (unmarried) 5 August 1935 at Highland Falls, New York. According to the Weller genealogy, she was a school-teacher for 35 years.
  2. Catharina Mould, born 22 February 1818, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 10 or 13 August following, “aged 6 months,” and buried with her paternal grandparents in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard. She was living with her mother in 1900, when she is called a school-teacher.
  3. 12Daniel Mould, born 6 June 1819, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 12 March 1902, and buried in Montgomery New Cemetery.
  4. Moses Mould, born 7 October 1821, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 14 August 1877. Although he is not credited by Mackenzie with any marriage, he was clearly the Moses Mould, “killed in a railroad wreck,” who, being then aged 25 years, married 18 November 1847 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Mary Van Alst, born 7 April 1826, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, possibly died about the same time as her husband, daughter of Bergoon Van Alst, of Crawford, by the latter’s wife Jane Lowe, and sister of Ebenezer Van Alst, who married Moses’ sister, Eve Mould, below.[215] At the time of their marriage both parties were of Montgomery. Moses Mould joined the church in June 1849. A seeming reference to them in 1882 reads:
    Moses Mould and wife, suddenly called away by that strange providence, “lovely and pleasant were they in their lives, and in their death they were not divided.” There sat also David Mould, the patron and friend of the Tract Society, as of every good work; and next to him the sister, whose poetic thoughts often led the people of God to higher meditations. I seem to see her now standing, Bible in hand, before that huge class of young ladies enchaining attention as she expounded to them the mysteries of truth.[216]
    Known issue:
    1. John Bergoon Mould, born 16 August 1848, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
  5. Eva Mould, born 4 March 1824, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 11 May 1891, and buried in the Montgomery New Cemetery. She, being then of Montgomery, married 6 November 1846 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Ebenezer Van Alst, of Crawford, farmer, baptized 6 November 1823 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 1902, and buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard, son of Bergoon Van Alst, of Crawford, by his wife Jane Lowe, and brother of Mary Van Alst, who married Eva Mould’s brother, Moses Mould.[217] The names of Ebenezer Van Alst and Eve Mould occur as adjacent entries in the membership list of the Montgomery Dutch Church, dated June 1844 and December 1845 respectively. Known issue:
    1. Mary Jane Van Alst, born 29 August 1847, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 3 July 1860, “aged 12 years, 10 months, 4 days,” and buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard.
    2. George A. Van Alst, born 26 April 1849, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 29 July 1860, “aged 11 years, 3 months, 3 days,” and buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard.
    3. Anna Van Alst, born 17 July 1854, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    4. Ella Van Alst, born 28 July 1861, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    5. George Van Alst, born 7 October 1873, in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
  6. Mary Emma Mould, born 17 July 1826, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 1899, and buried with her husband in Montgomery Presbyterian Cemetery.[218] She, being then of Montgomery, married 27 March 1845 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Thomas Wait, of Montgomery, born 27 January 1821 or 1823 (his tombstone says 1823) at Neeley Town (part of Montgomery), died 1903, son of Samuel and Mary (Welch) Wait, of Montgomery, previously of Banwell, Somersetshire. His name is written “Thomas Weit” in the marriage record. She transferred out of the Montgomery Dutch Church on 3 April 1854. They had fourteen children, of whom nine lived to maturity:[219]
    1. Martha Wait, born 3 June 1847, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church. She married Chauncey Brooks, of Montgomery.[220]
    2. Charles D. Wait, born 6 August 1848, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church. In 1895 he was “engaged in the coal and feed business in Montgomery.”
    3. George W. Waite, no baptismal record found, who took over his parents’ farm.
    4. Mary Emma Wait, born 10 October 1850, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church. She married Hiram H. Hawkins, of the town of Hamptonburgh, farmer.
    5. Sarah F. Wait; married Frank Eager, of Howell, Michigan, farmer.
    6. Effie Wait; married Charles W. Hill, of Walden, a coal, feed, and lumber merchant.
    7. Dr. Wesley Wait, of Newburgh, dental surgeon and inventor, born 15 May 1861 near Montgomery, died 1949. He married (1) in 1885, Emily Smith Rawlins, born 20 April 1860 at Galena, Jo Daviess County, Illinois, died 25 March 1897, daughter of Gen. John Aaron Rawlins, Chief of Staff to Ulysses S. Grant, and U.S. Secretary of War, by the latter’s first wife, Emily Smith.[221] He married (2) in 1905, Anna E. Knapp, died 1920, daughter of Samuel T. Knapp, of New York City. He married (3) the much younger Lillian Bull, born 31 March 1887 at Chester, Orange Co., daughter of Charles Ira Bull and Mary Elizabeth Green. A plausible biographical sketch of Wait appeared in a local history published in 1899, which reads, in part:
      He received his education at the district school and Montgomery Academy. In 1881 he entered New York College of Denistry, and eight months after was appointed first assistant to Professor J.B. Littig. In 1883 he graduated one year ahead of his class, his degree not being conferred until 1884, and began the practice of his profession at Newburgh in 1885. He is the proprietor of the Consumers Ice Company, now leased to the Muchattoes Lake Ice Company, also of the Newburgh Floral Company, having store on Second Street and greenhouses at West Newburgh, which contain thirty thousand feet of glass. He still practices the profession of denistry. From 1890 to 1893 he represented New York State in the American Association of Inventors and Manufacturers, and in 1S91 represented this Congressional District at the Patent Centennial at Washington, D.C., being the inventor and owner of several valuable inventions…. His residence is on Grand Avenue, Balmville, N.Y.[222]
      The claim to have been an inventor is substantiated by only one patent unearthed so far, registered many years later in 1928, for “Metallic bonding for concrete supports,” a proposal for interlocking metal beams for use in building foundations and in mines, which looks plausible enough but seems never to have been put into production.[223] But by 1917, Wait’s description of himself had acquired several elaborations which strain credulity, including an alleged business relationship with Thomas Edison.[224] This assertion is notably absent from the posthumous memoir of Wait in the National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 38:335. Wait is not listed in any other standard work of reference, and despite the allegations in NCAB that he “published many articles on scientific subjects,” nothing signed by him appears in any of the major indexes to English-language periodical literature of the period. Wait entered into correspondence with staff of the Smithsonian Institution which extended from 1921 to 1925, and the rather dry official account of this encounter states: “Though most of this correspondence is presently missing, these papers contain a typescript of “The Unity of the Universal Existence” by Wait, 1901, and nineteen oversize drawings and charts which document Wait’s theory.[225] By his first wife he had an only child:
      1. Lucile Wait; married John Springstead Bull, born 16 August 1877, died 24 October 1938, and buried in Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newburgh, son of Stephen M. Bull and Martha Oakley.[226] Although his wife is not found with him, three of his sons are buried in the same cemetery. Known issue:
        1. Stephen Moffat Bull, born 19 January 1907, died 12 February 1941, and buried in Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newburgh.
        2. John A. Rawlings Bull, called “Rollond” in the 1910 census, born 25 July 1908, died 5 March 1918, and buried in Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newburgh.
        3. William Bull, born in 1913-14 in New York State.
        4. Richard (“Pete”) Wait Bull, born 31 July 1914, died 27 May 2005, and buried in Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newburgh.
    8. Alida Wait; married Ira H. Freen, of Chester, agriculturalist.
    9. Anna B. Wait, still living unmarried with her parents in 1895.
  7. Martha Mould, born 17 February 1828 (according to her baptismal record), died (unmarried) 4 October 1845, “aged 17 years, 8 months, 1 day,” and buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard.
  8. Jesse Fonda Mould, born 18 December 1831, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 26 September 1911, and buried with his wife in the Montgomery New Cemetery. He married before 1855, Hannah M. Eager, born 6 July 1831, died 1 February 1872, daughter of John Eager and Delia Case. Jesse F. Mould became a member of the Montgomery Dutch Church in June 1857. Issue:
    1. Charles Everett Mould, of St. Petersburg, Florida, born ____; married Mary Andrews, born 1864, daughter of Nehemiah Andrews and Sarah M. Christ.
    2. Mary E. Mould (twin to Delia), born 15 September 1855, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died (unmarried) 10 April 1927, and buried in Montgomery New Cemetery.
    3. Delia Eager Mould (twin to Mary), born 15 September 1855,[227], baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church. She married by 1877, Louis Brown, born 16 December 1851, died 5 September 1900, son of Daniel Tompkins Browna and Lucretia Susan Wood. According to the Weller genealogy, her husband was from Duluth, Minnesota, and they moved to Campbell Hall, New York, in 1897. Known issue:[228]
      1. Jesse T. Brown, born 1877.
      2. Lucretia W. Brown, born 1879.
      3. Charles Brown.
      4. Ray Everett Brown, born 16 January 1882, baptized 30 July following in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
      5. Ross Brown.
    4. Robert Lee Mould, born 21 March 1859, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church; died young as another son was given the same name in 1865.
    5. Martha C. Mould, born said to have been born in 1859 but this conflicts with the date of birth of the previous child, died (unmarried) 10 April 1927, and buried in Montgomery New Cemetery.
    6. Charles Everett Mould, born 9 March 1864, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    7. Robert L. Mould, born 20 August 1865, died in infancy 18 March 1866.
    8. Martha Mould, born 8 February 1867, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    9. Jesse F. Mould, Jr., born 3 September 1870, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 21 October following (death date written into baptismal register).
  9. Herman Mould, born 24 April 1834, died 9 October 1841, “aged 7 years, 5 months, 20 days,” and buried with his paternal grandparents in the Montgomery Dutch Churchyard.
  10. William S. Mould, of Montgomery, farmer, born 8 January 1837, baptized in Montgomery Dutch Church, died 1922, and buried with his wife in Montgomery New Cemetery. He was a member of the Excise Board of Montgomery Tp. in 1881. He married about 1863, Hannah B. Conning, born 5 May 1843, died 1925, daughter of William Conning and Eliza H. Rogers. William S. Mould appears in the 1900 census of “Montgomery Township excluding Montgomery Village,” in which he is called a farmer.[229] Known issue:
    1. Ida Mould, born 1866; not living with her parents in 1900.
    2. William J. Mould, born in September 1871 (per 1900 census).
  11. John C. Mould, born 8 October 1839, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 16 March 1908, and buried with his wife in Montgomery New Cemetery. He married by 1865, Sarah Maria Sherman, born 1836, died 1917. Known issue:
    1. Josephine Mould, born 1865, died 1867, and buried with her parents.
    2. DeWitt Mould, born in November 1873, baptized in Jan. 1874 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    3. Maud S. Mould, born 25 September 1881, baptized 2 June 1882 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
  12. Anna Catharine Mould, born 27 April 1842, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 23 August 1914, and buried with her husband in Montgomery New Cemetery. She married 10 October 1866, Abner Bookstaver, of Montgomery, farmer, born 10 October 1836, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 26 March or April 1905, son of Daniel Bookstaver and Lettie Maria Weller (4.iii.d.2.VII).[230] They probably had only one child:
    1. Lettie M. Bookstaver, born 1866-67, alive at the taking of the 1880 census.

10. Philip5 Mould, son of Christoffel Mould and Rubina Dickerson, was born 28 June 1785, baptized 7 July following (no sponsors named in record), and died 12 December 1866, “aged 82 years” (sic), and buried with his two wives and his daughter Emily in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard. According to a biographical sketch of his grandson, Daniel Sutherland Mapes, he lived three miles south of the town of Montgomery. He married (1) before 1809, Eleanor (“Nelly”) Southerland, born ca. 12 July 1785, died 28 (?) June 1837, aged 53 years. Mary (Comfort) (Douglass) Mould He married (2) (as her second husband) 14 June 1838 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, his second cousin, Mary (Comfort) Douglass, born 12 February 1792, died 20 June 1881, “aged 88 years” (sic), daughter of Samuel Comfort, of Montgomery Tp., by the latter’s wife Anna Maria Youngblood, and widow of Isaac Douglass, by whom she had had three or four children, including Emily Douglass (1818-1897), wife of her third cousin, John Mould (no. 14).[231] Both are buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard. Known issue, all baptized in Montgomery Dutch Church (the records giving dates of births rather than of baptisms):

  1. Ann Eliza Mould, born 31 May 1809. Despite the ostensible discrepancy in their names, she was perhaps identical with Catherine Anne Mould, born 1809, died 21 February 1857, who married 7 November 1832 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, James Fulton Comfort, born 16 March 1805, died 28 November 1880, by whom she had six children, for a full account of whom, and further details on them, see CFA, pp. 425-29. At the time of their marriage she was of Montgomery, and he of Crawford. They transferred out of the Montgomery Dutch Church in April of 1834. She named her second son Philip Mould Comfort, suggesting that her father’s name was Philip Mould, and there does not seem to be any other possible place for her in the family. Also, she named her first son Milton Bookstaver Comfort, possibly after Milton Bookstaver (1808-) (no. 8.iv.c), who would then have been her first cousin.
  2. Daniel Southerland Mould (twin), born 24 July 1810, died 1 August 1887, and buried with his wife in the New Prospect Reformed Dutch Church Ground, Shawangunk, Ulster Co.[232] He married 11 April 1837 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, his second cousin, Eve Ann Rowe, born 3 January 1815, died 1 February 1885, daughter of Moses Rowe and Maria Mould. At the time of their marriage both parties were of Montgomery. A Mary E. Mould (ca. 1843-1880) and John T. Mould (1851-1888) are buried with them.
  3. Elizabeth Mould (twin), born 24 July 1810, baptized as Eliza, died 1880 at Butler, N.J. She married 4 February 1836 Robert Milton Mapes (called Milton in their marriage record), born 1811-12, died 1 January 1894 at Montgomery, aged 82 years. At the time of their marriage she was of Montgomery, and he of Mt. Hope. She transferred out of the Montgomery Dutch Church on 2 April 1838. “In 1840 [they] … located in Sullivan Co., N.Y., “but after a residence there of about twenty-eight years, returned to Orange County, settling on a portion of the old farm belonging to his father-in-law, three miles south of Montgomery. After carrying on agricultural pursuits there for some three years, he became agent for the Susquehanna & Western Railroad, being located at Little Ferry, N.J., where he remained for seven years.”[233] They had at least one child, a son, Daniel Sutherland Mapes, born 22 March 1845 at Beaver Brook, Sullivan County, N.Y.
  4. Ruanna Mould, born 17 September 1813. A Ruanna Mould of Montgomery married 9 June 1842 in the Mongomery Dutch Church, John David, also of Montgomery.
  5. Christoffer Mould, born 28 October 1815. He is almost certainly the Christopher P. Mould who died 13 May 1898, aged 83 years (per the Montgomery Dutch Church burial register), who previously as “Christopher P. Moeild of Montgomery” married 8 November 1843 in the First Presbyterian Church of Goshen,[234] Sarah Maria Eager, of Hamptonburgh. The witnesses were Willm. Shafer, Letty McCord, and Joseph Case (none of whom we can identify). That couple had the following issue:
    1. Joseph Case Mould, born 20 August 1845, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church; possiby the Joseph C. Mould who married before 1874, Annie L. Wallace. “Anna L. Wallace, wife of C. Mould” joined the church in june 1868, and they had children baptized there from 1874 onward.
  6. Maria Mould, born 21 March 1818.
  7. John Mould, born 7 April 1820.
  8. Eleanor Mould, born 13 August 1822.
  9. Emily Mould, born 10 October 1824, died 3 December 1833, “aged 9 years, 2 months, 3 days.” and buried in Montgomery Dutch Churchyard.
  10. Marcus Mould, born 28 January 1827.

11. Jonathan5 Mould, of Montgomery, son of Johannes Mould, Jr., and Maria Louw, was born ca. 24 January 1782, baptized 3 March following, died 14 September 1855, “aged 73 years, 7 months, 20 days,” and buried with his wife and their son David in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard. He married 21 April 1803 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, his first cousin, Elizabeth Mould, born ca. 31 March 1781, died 12 September 1841, “aged 61 years, 5 months, 12 days,” and buried with her husband, daughter of Christoffel Mould (no. 8), and had issue. Known issue (all baptisms in the Montgomery Church; records give dates of births only, not those of baptism):

  1. Ruanna Mould, born 6 February 1804 (per baptismal record; baptized as “Roaria”), died 4 May 1878, “aged 74 years, 3 months” (which disagrees with her baptismal record), and buried with her husband in the Montgomery Dutch chuchyard. She married 22 August 1822 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, John M. Ashby, born ca. 22 December 1801, died 27 September 1857, “aged 57 years, 7 months, 5 days,” and had issue.[235] Their children included:
    1. Jane Elizabeth Ashby (sometimes called Jane, sometimes Elizabeth), born 19 May 1823, died 5 October 1910 at Janesville, Wisconsin. She married 27 October 1842 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Cornelius Sammons Decker, a farmer, born 26 February 1820 in New York State, died 17 October 1906 at Janesville, Wisconsin. About 1861 they removed from Montgomery to Janesville, Wisconsin. Known issue, all baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (apart from two unaccounted for, who died before 1905):
      1. Jonathan M. Decker, born ca. 1843-1845; living at Janesville, Wisconsin in 1905. He married before 1866, Hannah T. _____. They are found in the 1880 census. Known issue (birthdates calculated from 1880 census):
        1. George M. Decker, born 1865-66.
        2. William T. Decker, born 1867-68
        3. Charles C. Decker, born 1869-70.
        4. Jonthan Decker, born 1871-72.
      2. Francis (“Frank”) Decker, born ca. 1844-47; living in Nebraska in 1905.
      3. William Decker, born ca. 1847-48, died before 1905.
      4. Theodore C. Decker, born 1849-51; he was a farmer in Janesville, Wisconsin in 1905. He married in 1871, Mary McNamara, of Massachusetts. Only known child:
        1. Frank D. Decker, born at Janesville, Wisconsin; married Ora Turnay.
      5. John Ashby Decker, born ca. 1853-54; living in Janesville, Wisconsin, in 1905. He married 22 March 1877 in Rock County, Wisonsin, Jane Cordelia McNamara, perhaps the sister of Mary McNamara who was the wife of his older brother Theodore C. Decker. No issue traced.
      6. Anna G. Decker, born ca. 1856-58; living at Sioux City, Iowa, in 1905. [#80316 in DAR Lineage Book 81, p120-121] she married 10 October 1884 in Rock County, Wisconsin, her first cousin once removed and second cousin once removed, David Mould, Jr. (no. 12.ii.g.4), born in February 1856 (per 1900 census), baptized 14 April 14 1856 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, son of David Mould and Mary C. Rowe.
      7. Catherine M. Decker, born ca. 1860, died before 1870 as she is not listed with her parents in the 1870 census.
      8. Cornelius S. Decker, born ca. 1865, died before 1905.
    2. Maria Ashby, born 24 November 1827, died 1 September 1893, aged 65 years, 9 months, and 7 days, and buried with her husband in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard. She married 1 December 1850 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, her first cousin once removed and second cousin once removed, William Embler (no. 9.ix.d), born 18 June 1823, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 21 September 1885, aged 62 years, 3 months, and 3 days, son of Daniel Embler and Catharina Menina Mould (there is a published Embler genealogy treating this family, which we have not personally seen). She was received into membership in the Montgomery Dutch Church in June 1856. For further details see his account.
  2. Maria Mould, born 15 January 1806 (per baptismal record), died 26 March 1868, and buried with her husband in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard. She married 15 January 1827 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Hamilton Morrison, Jr., born 24 August 1804, died 25 October 1881, son of Hamilton and Lydia (Beemer) Morrison.[236] According to the sketch of him in The History of Orange County, New York (1908), “Hamilton Morrison was born … at the old homestead, which is now owned by his sons, George H. and John G. This property has been handed down from father to son since long before the Revolution…. Hamilton Morrison passed his entire life on this farm in the town of Montgomery. When a young man he taught school and after marriage gave his attention to cultivating his broad acres. He was very successful in his undertakings. He was foremost in founding the Orange County Agricultural Society, of which he was president for many years.” Known issue, all baptized in the Montgomery Dutch church:[237]
    1. Jonathan Mould Morrison, born 27 November 1827; married by 1908, Margaret Windfield.
    2. David Alexander Morrison, born 20 September 1829; married by 1908, Mary R. Lipsett.
    3. George Hamilton Morrison, born 2 July 1832, unmarried in 1908. He was the author of Genealogy of the descendants of John Morrison and Prudence Gwyn (Newburgh, 1907), which we have not seen, but which we are informed inexplicably omits his sister Elizabeth.[238] and also of Inscriptions on stones, monuments and tombs in the burying ground at Little Britain, Orange County, N.Y. October 1, 1909 (Newburgh, 1909).
    4. Mary Jane Morrison, born 29 August 1835. She married by 1908, Elijah Carpenter Thayer, of Hamptonburgh, died by 1895, son of William Thayer and Elizabeth Carpenter.[239] The Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County, published in 1895, calls her his widow. Known issue:
      1. Minnie Morrison Thayer.
      2. Estelle Thayer.
      3. Lizzie A. Thayer; married W. Henry Webb.
    5. John Gwyn Morrison (his middle name is spelt Guin in the baptismal record), born 20 August 1837, unmarried in 1908.
    6. William Henry Harrison Morrison, farmer, born 12 August 1841; married by 1908, Agnes Horton.
    7. Elizabeth Mould Morrison, born 21 August 1844. Pat Eckhardt points out that this daughter is omitted both in the record of her parents’s family in The History of Orange County, New York (1908), and in the family record published in 1907 by George Hamilton Morrison also fails to mention her. Yet she was baptized in the same church as all her siblings, the parents being named as Hamilton Morrison and Maria Mould, and she is mentioned in the account of them in Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County (1895). She married 18 November 1869, William C. Hart, of Walden, born 18 December 1843 at Montgomery, died ____ at Walden, N.Y., son of Henry Crist Hart and Hannah J. Overheiser. Known issue:
      1. Robert Clarence Hart, born ca. 1870 at Walden, N.Y., died ____ at Spokane, Washington.
      2. Henry Melvin Hart, born ca. 1871 at Walden, N.Y.
      3. Harry H. Hart, born 1875 at Montgomery.
      4. Hubert C. Hart, born 1877 at Montgomery.
  3. 13David Mould, born 2 September 1808 (per baptismal record).
  4. 14John Mould, born 16 June 1813.

12. Daniel6 Mould, of Montgomery Tp., farmer, son of Johannes C. Mould and Mary Shafer, was born 6 June 1819, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 12 March 1902, and is buried with his wife in Montgomery New Cemetery. He married 8 May 1851, his kinswoman, Letitia (“Letta”) Bull, born 13 January 1822, died 5 September 1874, daughter of Milton Bull and Esther Crawford, and granddaughter of Daniel Bull and Catharine Miller (no. 4.iii.b.1).[240] “Letta Bull, wife of Daniel Mould” became a member of the Montgomery Dutch Church in September 1852. Issue (per Weller genealogy):

  1. Hermon [sic] Mould, born 11 April 1852, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 2 May 1863, and buried in the Montgomery New Cemetery.
  2. Christopher D. Mould, born 1 January 1855, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died in February 1934 at Sidney, New York, and buried with his first two wives in the Montgomery New Cemetery. He married (1) 20 October 1875 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Louisa/Louise Bergen Lawrence, born 15 March 1848 at Bell Flowers, Illinois, died 3 July 1905. Both parties were residing in Montgomery township at the time of the marriage. He married (2) after 1905, Harriet E. Bodle, born 6 June 1850, died 6 March 1920. He married (3) Belle Marsh, born 1922, died Jan. 1930. Known issue, all by first wife:
    1. Daniel Lawrence Mould, born 16 September 1876, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    2. Letitia Bull Mould, born 13 April 1879, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    3. Magdalen Bergen Mould, born 1881. She married before 1906, Joseph Henry Wood, and had a daugher, Hazel Madgalen Louise Wood, baptized 2 June 1906 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    4. Susan Mould, born 1883.
    5. Charles Milton Mould, born 17 April 1886, baptized 1 September 1888 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    6. P. Jay Mould, born 1890.
    7. An unnamed child, possibly the foregoing, baptized 5 June 1891 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
  3. Sarah Bull Mould, born 7 October 1857, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 5 June 1868, and buried in Montgomery New Cemtery.
  4. Mary Crawford Mould, born 17 June 1859, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died (unmarried) 22 March 1891, and buried in the Montgomery New Cemetery.
  5. Milton Bull Mould, born 6 July 1862k, died 21 September 1939. He worked in the dairy trade in New York City. He married by 1890, Harriet Slaughter Mills, born 3 December 1863, died 18 February 1951, daughter of Emmett Mills and ____ Slaughter. Known issue:
    1. Alfred Mills, born 13 October 1890, baptized 6 June 1896 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    2. Esther Mills, born 13 November 1896, baptized 2 September 1897 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
  6. Elizabeth V. Mould, born 14 October 1865, died 27 April (1848). She married 18 March 1885 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, John J. Downs, born 1860-61 (aged 24 years in 1885). Both parties were residing in Montgomery township at the time of the marriage. They are said to have had no issue.

13. David6 Mould, son of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Mould) Mould, was born 2 September 1808 (per baptismal record), died 6 December 1876, “aged 68 years, 3 months, 4 days,” and was buried with his parents, his wife, and two daughters in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard. He was a farmer. He married 16 October 1845 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, his first cousin and second cousin, Mary Catharine Rowe (no. 9.vii.f), born 26 February 1821, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 1 December 1906, “aged 85 years, 9 months, 3 days,” and buried with her husband, daughter of Moses Rowe and Maria Mould. Both parties were of Montgomery at the time of the marriage. The 1850 census lists David, farmer, with his wife, Mary, son John and daughter Elizabeth as part of the household of David’s widowed father, Jonathan Mould. Known issue:[241]

  1. John D. Mould, born 30 September 1848, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church. He married in 1881, Mary Van Alst, born 1856. They appear in the 1900 census. Known issue (birthdates per 1900 census):
    1. David Mould, born in September 1882, baptized 1 June 1883 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    2. Mary Adda Mould, born in November 1883, baptized 30 May 1884 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    3. Nellie Elizabeth Mould, born 30 October 1885, baptized 4 June 1886 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    4. Cora Marguerite Mould, called Margarite (sic) in the 1900 census, born 21 May 1891, baptized 4 September following in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    5. Thomas Daniel Mould, born 24 July 1900, baptized 31 May 1901 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
  2. Elizabeth Mould, born 18 April 1850, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
  3. Mary Mould, born 17 July 1854, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 10 October 1865, and buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard.
  4. David Mould, Jr., born in February 1856 (per 1900 census), baptized 14 April 14 1856 in the Montgomery Dutch Church. He was an attorney-at-Law, in 1884 forming an association with C.R. Marks under the name Marks & Mould at Sioux City, Iowa, and afterward becoming district judge in Sioux City.[242] He and his wife Anna were still living there in 1905. He married 10 October 1884 in Rock County, Wisconsin, his first cousin once removed, Anna G. Decker (no. 12.i.a.5), born ca. 1856-58 [#80316 in DAR Lineage Book 81, pp. 120-121], daughter of Cornelius Sammons Decker and Jane Elizabeth Ashby. Known issue (birthdates per 1900 census):
    1. Henry E. Mould, born in Jan. 1887.
    2. Thomas Mould, born in May 1890.
    3. Decker Mould, born in October 1891.
  5. Moses Rowe Mould, baptized 25 December 1857 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, probably died young as he does not appear with his parents in the 1860 census.
  6. Thomas Mould, born ca. 1859 (based on census records). This is likely the Thomas Mould (1859-1928) who with wife Elizabeth (1850-1920) and daughter Frances S. Mould (1865-) is buried in Slate Hill Cemetery, near Goshen, New York.[243]
  7. Susan Eleanor Mould, born ca. 3 February 1862 (by calculation), died 14 January 1866, and burried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard.

Emily (Douglass) Mould John Mould (1813-1890)

14. John6 Mould, son of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Mould) Mould, was born 16 June 1813 on the family homestead at Montgomery, died there 9 October 1890, and was buried with his wife in Montgomery Dutch churchyard. He was a farmer.[244] He married 24 January 1838 [or 1839?] in the Montgomery Dutch Church,[245] his third cousin, Emily Douglass, born 27 February 1818 at Catskill, New York, died 11 or 12 May 1897 at Poughkeepsie, New York, aged over 79 years, daughter of Isaac Douglass (the anonymous author of The Wanderer, or Horatio and Laetitia) by his wife Mary Comfort (which Mary was subsequently the wife of Philip Mould, no. 10).[246] At the time of their marriage both parties were of Montgomery. “Emily Douglas, wife of John Mould” joined the Montgomery Dutch Church in September 1841. Emily Douglass’s father was a teacher at Montgomery Academy, and she herself is said to have been educated there. CFA is generally well-informed concerning their issue.[247] Their children were:

  1. Mary Elizabeth Mould, born 21 October 1839, and baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (no date of baptism being given in the record), died 20 June 1914 at New York City, and buried with her husband in the Poughkeepsie Rural Cemetery. She married in 1863, George Washington Pierson, born about 1837, died 1909, son of Elias Pierson and his second wife Elsie Milspaugh.[248] Her husband was a school-teacher and lecturer, and prior to their marriage had lived at Walden and at Montgomery. They lived during most of their married life at Montgomery, with short periods of time spent at Suffern and at Ramapoe, New York. In 1882 they moved to Poughkeepsie, and their children Emily, Margaret, Frank, and May are all buried in the Poughkeepsie Rural Cemetery. In her widowhood Mary lived with her daughter Margaret at New York City. Issue:[249] See below for a photograph of this family.
    1. John Mould Pierson (twin to Emily), born 26 September 1864, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 15 December 1955. He married in 1909, Hattie Agar, and they were parents of Marshall Pierson, who compiled valuable notes on this family, copies of which were kindly supplied by Jody (Pierson) Masterson.
    2. Emily Douglas Pierson (twin to John), born 26 September 1864, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 18 March 1958.
    3. Edward Pierson, died in infancy in 1868.
    4. Margaret King Pierson, born 20 February 1873, baptized 6 September following in the Montgomery Dutch Church, 5 November 1944.
    5. Frank Holmes Pierson, born 17 February 1875, baptized 3 September following in the Montgomery Dutch Church, died 18 June 1953. He was the great-grandfather of Jody (Pierson) Masterson, our informant on this family.
    6. Mary (“May”) Mould Pierson, born 14 August 1878, died 11 August 1963.
  2. Jonathan Mould, born 18 December 1840, “died July 10, 18[44], aged 3 years, 6 months, 22 days, son of John & Emily,” buried in the Montgomery Dutch Churchyard. According to CFA, which was clearly drawing on some family source, Jonathan Mould was born in 1841, and died in infancy. The year of this stone has been read as 1811, but as pointed out to us by Susanne (Embler) Devine, if the date were actually 1844 it would imply a birthdate of about 18 June 1840, which would fit well for a child of the present couple.
  3. Sarah Mould, born 3 June 1843, unmarried at the publication of the biographical sketch of her brother Frank in 1895, and died unmarried in 1943, according to CFA, which would make her a centennarian at her death.
  4. Emma Frances Mould, born 22 December 1845, died 1910. She married 18 November 1869, Allen Bryson, a farmer, born 1827-28 (aged 53 in 1880) in New York State, of Irish parentage. They are found in the 1881 census of Commerce, Oakland Co., Michigan,[250] but later returned to New York State. According to a local history published in 1914, “Allen Bryson resides at Saratoga Farm (Montgomery) on forks of the Goshen and Middletown Road.”[251] Issue:
    1. Alice Bryson, born 1880-81 (aged 9 in 1880) in New York State; married in 1894, George Bell, of Reading, Pennsylvania. According to a local history, “George H. Bell (son of Dr. William P. Bell), partner of Jonathan Mould since 1887, was born in 1862 at Fishkill-on-the-Hudson, N.Y., and was educated in the local schools. He entered the department store of Mr. Mould, his brother-in-law [sic!], at Reading in 1877, as a salesman, and in several years showed so much proficiency that he was placed in charge of one of the departments. In 1887 he became a partner, and since then the business has been conducted under the name of J. Mould & Co. In 1894 Mr. Bell married Alice Bryson (daughter of Allen Bryson, of Orange county, N. Y., and Emma F. Mould, his wife, a sister of Mr. Mould). They have three children: Jonathan Mould, Helen, and George Allen. They are members of Trinity Lutheran Church; and Mrs. Bell is a member of the D. A. R. at Reading, Conrad Weiser Chapter.”[252]
    2. Caroline (“Carrie”) Bryson, born 1881-82 (aged 8 in 1880) in New York State; died unmarried.
    3. Josepha Bryson, apparently born after the taking of the 1880 census; “at home” in 1914.
  5. Jonathan Mould, born 20 February 1847, died 1931. He married in 1871, Julia E. Bell, “daughter of Dr. William P. Bell, a prominent physician of Fishkill-on-the-Hudson, N.Y.”[253] Jonathan Mould CFA states that they had no issue. A biographical notice in a local history, the source of the portrait reproduced here, reads, in part:
    Jonathan Mould, merchant at Reading since 1871, was born in Orange county, N.Y., near Newburg, February 20, 1847, and educated in the pay schools of the vicinity and at the Montgomery Academy. He was reared on his father’s farm during the course of his education until he was eighteen years old, when he went to Newburg and entered the large dry-goods store of A.K. Chandler as a salesman, and he continued there seven years. During the later years he assisted Mr. Chandler in establishing and operating a chain of dry-goods stores in New York and Pennsylvania. In this capacity, he was sent to Reading, Pa., in January, 1871, and after operating the store for over a year it was sold to Schofield & Co.
        Mr. Mould, during this interval, having come to appreciate Reading as a business center, remained with the new firm, and assisted in the management of the store until January, 1875, when he embarked in business for himself. He established a department store at No. 325 Penn street, and in three years moved into larger quarters at No. 645 Penn street, where he continued with increasing success for twelve years. In 1890, he purchased the two adjoining premises on the east, Nos. 647-649, and upon erecting a large four-story brick store building … moved into the new quarters, where he has since been conducting a department store with upward of a hundred employees, and a wholesale and retail trade which reaches into the surrounding districts and adjoining counties. In 1887, his brother-in-law [sic!], George M. Bell (after being employed in the store for ten years), was admitted as a partner, and since then the business has been carried on under the name of J. Mould & Co. Mr. Mould has been identified for some years with the Farmer’s National Bank of Reading, the Neversink Bank, and a number of industrial enterprises, serving in each of them as one of the directors. In 1871 Mr. Mould married Julia E. Bell…. They are members of the Trinity Lutheran Church at Reading, having been identified with this church since 1871.[254]
  6. Harrison Douglas Mould, born 24 December 1848, called a “travelling salesman, with headquarters at Poughkeepsie, N.Y.” in the 1895 biographical sketch of his brother Frank. He is inexplicably missed in CFA.
  7. Catherine Rowena Mould, born 24 February 1850, died 28 September 1914. She married (as his second wife) 1 September 1875 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Nicholas Ichabod Quackenbos, born 14 April 1838 in New York City, died 23 November 1898, and buried at the Brick Church Cemetery, Montgomery, son of Mangle Minthorn Quackenbos, of New York, Alderman, by the latter’s wife Juliana M. Clark. Both parties were residing in Montgomery township at the time of the marriage. Her husband, who was a wealthy landowner, was the widower of Mary Carvey, by whom he had five children. A biographical sketch of him published in 1895 reads, in part: “While Mr. Quackenbos has never been prevailed upon to accept public office, he is interested in municipal matters and politically gives his vote to the candidates and principles of the Republican party. He is a frequent attendant at the meetings of the Republicans of the county, and in conventions his voice may often be heard in explanation or defense of some progressive measure. He was reared in the Episcopalian faith, but is now identified with the Dutch Reformed Church in Montgomery.”[255] A memorial notice, published in 1899, reads, in part: “When about twenty-one years of age Mr. Quackenbos selected Montgomery, N.Y., as his future place of residence, where he purchased a tract of land very pleasantly situated, which he brought to a high state of cultivation and later erected thereon one of the most modern homes in the valley of the Wallkill. Mr. Quackenbos had strong characteristics, blended with many graces…. He gave liberally of his wealth to the support of his Church and public benevolence. He had the happy faculty of forming close, true friendships, with a magnetic power that drew to him without conscious effort the hearts of those with whom he came in touch.”[256] Issue:
    1. Julia Minthorn (“Minna”) Quackenbos, born 14 January 1876, baptized 1 June 1877 in the Montgomery Dutch Church. She married William N. Howell.
    2. Harrison Mould Quackenbos, born in 1878, baptized 1 June 1879 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    3. Frederick Allen Quackenbos, born in 1881, baptized 2 June 1882 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
    4. George Nicholas Quackenbos, born 7 March 1891, baptized 10 June 1892 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
  8. Washington Mould (twin to Franklin), born 9 March 1851, died 22 September 1851, and buried in Montgomery Dutch Churchyard.
  9. Franklin (“Frank”) Mould (twin to Washington), born 9 March 1851,[257] died 1927. He married (1) 29 January 1884, Annie Lewis, died 1885, from Scranton, Pennsylvania. According to the 1895 biographical sketch, “Upon attaining his majority he went to Reading, Pa., where he engaged in a general mercantile businees with his brother Jonathan until 1894. Disposing of his interest in the enterprise at that time, he remained in Reading until the spring of 1895, when he returned to Orange County and purchased the homestead where he was born. This consists of one hundred acres of land, upon which valuable improvements have been placed, and which he is [sic] devoted to the raising of the various cereals.” He married (2) 6 December 1894, Olivia S. Fleming, from Reading, Pennsylvania. The 1895 biographical sketch mentions no issue.
  10. Caroline (“Carrie”) Mould, born ca. 1853. She married 13 January 1875 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Louis H. Holmes,[258] of Albany, N.Y. (per the 1895 biographical sketch of her brother Franklin). Both parties were residing in Montgomery township at the time of the marriage. CFA says they lived at Yonkers. Issue (per CFA):
    1. William Holmes.
    2. Edward Holmes.
  11. Isaac W. Mould, born 4 January 1855, died (unmarried) 19 March 1892.
  12. Maria M. Mould, born 24 December 1856, died (unmarried) 22 March 1891.
  13. Alice Thompson Mould, born 31 July 1858 (census records consistently understate her age), died (unmarried) 10 April 1937. The last surviving member of her family, she lived for many years at no. 15 Carroll Street, Poughkeepsie.
George Washington Pearson family

George Washington Pearson (ca. 1837–1909), his wife Mary Elizabeth Mould (1839–1914), and family, from a photograph kindly supplied by Jody Masterson. (Click for larger image)

Unplaced Persons

Probably most of the following persons were of the present family, but they cannot presently be placed in the pedigree:

Christopher Mould, died 15 November 1815 (per records of Montgomery Dutch Church).

John Mould, alive in 1822. He married 12 April 1815 in the Shawangunk Dutch Church, Elmira Smith, also alive in 1822. He cannot (as suggested in an earlier version of these notes) have been a son of Johannes Mould, Jr. (1756-1813), of Montgomery, as he is not named in the latter’s will. “Elmira wife of John Mould” joined the Montgomery Dutch Church in September 1819. They had the following issue, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (the register giving the date of birth, not of baptism):

  1. Maria Mould, born 19 December 1815.
  2. Elizabeth Smith Mould, born 3 September 1822. She is possibly the Elizabeth S. Mould who married William I.C. Anderson, and had the following issue baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church:
    1. Anna A. Anderson, born 5 February 1842.
    2. Adam S. Anderson, born 27 December 1845.
    3. William H. Anderson, born 2 July 1848.
    4. Sarah F. Anderson, born 3 July 1851.
    5. Thomas Henry Anderson, born 28 December 1853.
    6. Charles Townley Anderson, born 22 April 1856.
    7. Edward Lee Anderson, born 21 January 1859.

Mary Ann Mould, married by 1816, Jacob Graham. They had the following only known child, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (the register giving the date of birth, not of baptism):

  1. William Hunter Graham, born 23 September 1816.

Catherine Mould, alive in 1823. She married before 1817, Abraham Weller, died 18 July 1857, and buried in Montgomery Dutch churchyard. The Weller genealogy, without explanation, identifies him with the Abraham Weller, baptized 28 November 1791, son of Jeronimus Weller and Sarah Smith. There is a stone in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard which reads according to a published transcription reads “Abraham Weller, died 18 July 1857, aged 65 years, 7 months, and 16 days. (The date of death is supported by the burial register, but it gives his age as only 60 years, at least according to the published transcription.) It is disturbingly coincidental that the implied birthdate of around 2 February 1792 does not agree with that of any known Abraham Weller, but exactly coincides with that of Catherine Mould (no. 7.x above), daughter of Christoffel Mould and Rubina Dickerson. This naturally invites the question of whether the inscription on the stone is confused or damaged in some way. In any case, the Catharine Mould who married Abraham Weller had the following issue, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (the register giving the date of birth, not of baptism):

  1. Sally Ann Weller, born 13 March 1817, 21 July 1819, aged 2 years, 4 months, and 8 days, and buried in Montgomery Dutch churchyard, her tombstone calling her a daughter of Abraham and Catherine Weller.
  2. Melinda Weller (the name is given as “Mulmina” in Hasbrouck’s transcription of the baptismal register), born 2 July 1820, died 16 June 1841, aged 23 years, 11 months, and 14 days, and buried as Milinda (sic), daughter of Abraham and Catherine Weller.
  3. Eliza Weller, born 19 December 1823, died 21 September 1841, aged 20 years, 9 months, and 2 days, and buried in Montgomery Dutch churchyard, her tombstone calling her a daughter of Abraham and Catherine Weller.

Abraham B. Moul, married 24 November 1819 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Jane Cool.

Eliza Moul, married by 1821, Matthew Smith. They had the following issue, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church (the register giving the date of birth, not of baptism):

  1. Minerva Smith, born 1 July 1821.

Samuel Mould married before 11 March 1833, Eve Robertson, who on 11 March 1833 requested to be dismissed from the Montgomery Dutch Church in order to transfer to another congregation.

Maria Mould, of Montgomery, alive in 1854. She married 12 February 1835 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Harvey Hunter, of Crawford, also alive in 1854. In the membership records of the Montgomery Dutch Church the names of John Mould (who has not been identified) and “Maria Mould, wife of Henry [sic] Hunter” occur as adjacent entries under date of May 1846. Known issue, all baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, no baptismal dates being stated in the records:

  1. Eliza Jane Hunter, born 19 December 1848.
  2. Charles Hunter, born 23 May 1851.
  3. Francis Smith Hunter, born 6 May 1854.
  4. Elizabeth Hunter, died 11 March 18__ (tombstone illegible), aged 11 years and 9 months, and buried in Montgomery Dutch churchyard as a daughter of Hervey (sic) and Maria Hunter.

Maria/Eliza Mould, of Montgomery, alive in 1858. She married 24 October 1839 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Albert Cranse, of Crawford, also alive in 1858. She is usually called Maria, but is called Eliza in the baptismal record of her son Herman (1842). The name of her eldest son, Christopher Mould Cranse, is probably a clue as to the name of her father. “Albert Crans and Mary Mould his wife” became members of the Montgomery Dutch Church in December 1840. Known issue, all baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, no baptismal dates being stated in the record (and with a possible gap between the fifth and sixth children):

  1. Christopher Mould Cranse, born 16 January 1841.
  2. Herman Cranse, born 21 August 1842.
  3. Emma Cranse, born 15 August 1846.
  4. Electus Cranse, born 13 June 1848.
  5. Catharine Ellen Cranse, born 4 November 1850, died 11 March 1864, and buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard, her tombstone calling her a daughter of Albert and Maria “Crans.” There are a number of other persons of this name buried there.
  6. Elizabeth Lee Cranse, born 26 September 1858.

John J. Mould, of Montgomery, alive in 1856. He married 1 December 1842 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Sarah Jane Van Vorhees (occasionally written Van Voorhees), of Montgomery, also alive in 1856. “Sarah Jane Van Voorhes wife of J. Mould” became a member of the Montgeromy Dutch Church in June 1848. He is called John J. Mould in the 1849 baptismal record of his daughter Amelia, which probably means that his father&rsuqo;s first name started with J. Known issue:

  1. Mary Ellen Mould, born 12 December 1844, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
  2. George Henry Mould, born 13 October 1846, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
  3. Amelia Mould, born 20 May 1849, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
  4. Caroline Mould, born 8 June 1851, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
  5. Alice Mould, born 10 August 1853, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
  6. Sarah Mould, born 19 June 1856, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.

Ellen Mould, of Montgomery, age unstated (although it should have been given), married 5 February 1852 in the Montgomery Dutch Church, Jacob P. Clayton, of Bethel, aged 24 years. Known issue:

  1. Harriet Alice Clayton, born 8 February 1854, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church.

William F. Mould, of Montgomery, alive in 1871. He married by 1866, Hannah B. Conning, also alive in 1871, and had the following issue, baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church:

  1. Ida Mould, born 18 December 1866, baptized in June 1867 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.
  2. William I. Mould, born 22 September 1871, baptized in June 1872 in the Montgomery Dutch Church.


Notes

1E.M. Ruttenber & L.H. Clark, History of Orange County… (1881), 411.
2Henry Z. Jones, Jr., Palatine Families of New York, 1710, 2 vols. (Universal City, California, 1985) [hereafter cited as PFNY], 2:1147.
3Not to be confused with Montgomery Co., N.Y.
4Henry Z. Johnes, More Palatine Families: Some Immigrants to the Middle Colonies, 1717-1776, and their European Origins (Universal City, California, 1991), vii.
5George Norbury Mackenzie, Colonial Families of the United States, 7 vols. (New York, 1901-1920), 6:369-73.
6Cecelia C. and Roland B. Botting, Comfort Families of America: A Collection of Genealogical Data (Brookings, South Dakota: the authors, 1971) [hereafter cited as CFA], p. 624.
7For a record of their issue see the biographical sketch of their son Frank in Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County, New York (New York & Chicago, 1895), pp. 702-3, at p. 702.
8The myth of the family’s Dutch origin is perpetuated, for example, in Mackenzie’s Colonial Families (1917, already cited), in Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, 7:623-4, and in CFA, 624.
9PFNY 1:600, 603.
10PFNY 1:600.
11PFNY 1:600.
12PFNY 1:604.
13PFNY 1:606.
14PFNY 1:606.
15PFNY 1:600.
16PFNY 1:606.
17PFNY 1:600.
18Henry Z. Jones, Jr., “More newly-discovered German origins for the Palatine families of New York, 1710,” The American Genealogist 88 (2016): 133-144, at pp. 143-44.
19PFNY 1:600-1. The two sons shown are each identified in later records as a “son of Johann Martin Maul of Heiligenborn.”
20He was 31 years of age in 1710.
21She was 31 years of age in 1710.
22“List of the Palatines remaining at New York, 1710,” printed in Documentary History of the State of New-York, ed. E.B. O’Callaghan, 4 vols. (1849-51), 3:562-65, at p. 564.
23Baptismal and Marriage registers of the Old Dutch Church at Kingston, Ulster County, New York, ed. Roswell Randall Hoes (1891), baptisms [hereafter KgB], no. 2953.
24KgB no. 3559.
25PFNY 2:1011.
26Henry Z. Jones & Lewis Bunker Rohrbach, Even More Palatine Families, 3 vols. (Rockport, Maine: Picton Press, 2002), 3:1717.
27PFNY 1:604.
28When his name disappears from the Hunter provisioning lists and is replaced by that of his widow.
29Doubtless of the same family was Johann Georg Theiss, who came with his wife and children from Hohenroth in the early 1750s, settled in Montgomery Tp., and maintained close ties to the Mauls; see Even More Palatine Families, 1:699-700.
30Their departure from Holland was presumably the source of the false statement, repeated in CFA, 624, that he was from Leyden.
31“List of the Palatines remaining at New York, 1710,” as cited above, at p. 564.
32PFNY 1:606.
33The children for whom we are unable to provide names must all have died young, because the Hunter list of 4 August 1710 only accounts for a total of six children.
34Marriages from 1639 to 1801 in the Reformed Dutch Church, New York (1890) [hereafter MDC], p. 141.
35On whom see Jones, More Palatine Families, 272.
36There are sketches of her in numerous biographical dictionaries, many containing false information based on Cooper (see below in the text), and almost all giving various erroneous years for her birth. Several also contain illustrations purporting to be portraits of her, which are absurdly anachronistic in style and (it is almost needless to point out) are inauthentic.
37The date of her death has been given as 1751, but with no evidence offered.
38MDC:137.
39There are memoirs of him in the Dictionary of American Biography, the Dictionary of Literary Biography, and many other standard works of reference. On his family see PFNY 2:1123-5, 1201-2, and Jones, More Palatine Families, 380-1.
40Modern writers insist on calling her Anna, but when she took over her husband’s business she always used the name Catharine in her imprints, despite the fact that she had a younger sister of that name.
41Most works call him a son of his father by the latter’s first wife, Mary White. However, his baptismal record disproves this contention.
42National Cyclopaedia of American Biography (NCAB), vol. 23, p. 148. A more factually accurate account of her than that in NCAB, listing woman printers of an earlier date than hers, was given a century before in “Female Printers and Editors,” Morning News [New York], vol. 3, issue 98 (4 March 1847), p. [2].
43Kent Cooper, Anna Zenger, Mother of Freedom (New York, 1946).
44Vincent Buranelli, “The Myth of Anna Zenger,” William and Mary Quarterly, series 3, vol. 13 (1956), 157-68, which among other corrections of previous writers refutes (at p. 160) the statement of NCAB cited above.
45All information on the children beyond their baptismal records is, unless otherwise stated, from Livingston Rutherfurd, John Peter Zenger: His Press, his Trial, and a bibliography of Zenger imprints … also a reprint of the first edition of the trial (New York: Peter Smith, 1941), 129. Zenger’s DAB article states that he was “survived” by six children, but several are not known from any records other than those of their baptisms.
46Baptisms … in the Reformed Dutch Church, New York, 2 vols. (1901, 1902) [hereafter BDC], 1:445.
47Death notice, The New-York Evening Post, issue 218 (24 June 1751), p. [3]; this notice was unknown Rutherford, p. 169, who only notes the date as falling between 18 March 1751 (the date of the last known issue of the New York Weekly Journal) and July 1751 (“when his presses and type were sold by auction”).
48BDC 2:113.
49BDC 2:153.
50BDC 1:460.
51MDC:184.
52See the memoir of this family in James Riker, Revised History of Harlem (1904), 591-7, at p. 595.
53BDC 1:441.
54BDC 1:478.
55BDC 1:492.
56MDC:173.
57Even More Palatine Families, 1:357-8, citing The Burghers of New Amsterdam and the Freemen of New York, 1675-1866, ed. Edward F. de Lancey (Collections of the New York Historical Society for the year 1885), p. 164.
58Records of the Chancery Court, Province and State of New York: Guardianships, 1691-1815, abstracted by Kenneth Scott (New York: The Holland Society of New York, 1971), p. 5.
59WNYHS 6:14-15.
60WNYHS 7:96-7.
61BDC 2:11.
62BDC 2:24.
63Charlton Hall Auctions, Lot no. 657, sold 20 June 2004, included a silhouette bearing a more-or-less contemporary inscription reading: “Ziba Westcott Kellum, son of James & Elizabeth Westcott Kellum. Born February 18th, 1782, married March 12, 1806. Mary Lane daughter of Mathias & Catherine Lenger Lane, Died April 25th, 1832.” See http://charltonhallauctions.com/index.php? page=13&cat=29&id=9838&os=201.
64William L. Messick, Messick, Dimter, MacIver, Kellum, Berry, Landes Family, available online at http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=wlmessick.
65Traced further in the database by William L. Messick cited above. See also the ancestry of a daughter of the last-named couple, Mrs. Ellen Lane (Patten) Taylor, in Lineage Book, National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, 20 (1897): 209-10; the memoir of a son, John Williams Patten, Jr. (1851-1923), in New England Historical and Genealogical Register 79 (1925):102-3; and Richard Lawrence Williams, Descendants of Robert Williams, available online at http://www.richwilliams.org/family/.
66Traced further in the database by William L. Messick cited above.
67MDC:134.
68As the name is usually spelled during this period. This name is found at Kingston in the early 18th century, but seems to have been otherwise unknown in New York City.
69MDC:138.
70MDC:162.
71BDC 1:212.
72PFNY 1:604. His surname is often written “Moul” in records produced by the Dutch, a spelling which came to be used by many of his descendants.
73KgB nos. 2810, 2953.
74PFNY 1:483, 482; 2:1083.
75Some of these details are from the account of the Mould family in George Norbury Mackenzie, Colonial Families of the United States, 6:369-73. Because we do not know the original sources of the statements made therein, we have used it with discretion. There is certainly some confusion between birth dates and baptismal dates.
76KgB no. 2068.
77Baptismal and Marriage registers of the Old Dutch Church at Kingston, Ulster County, New York, ed. Roswell Randall Hoes (1891), marriages [herafter KgM], no. 702.
78KgB no. 1708.
79For the marriages of Jacob Decker see KgM nos. 35, 196. For the baptism of his son Broer Decker see KgB no. 1244. This family is treated in a Decker genealogy by Benton Weaver Decker, which we have not seen.
80Minisink Valley Dutch Church Records (Collections of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, vol. 5, 1913), p. 281.
81See Pamela J. Sears, “Decker Triplets in 1749,” posting to Dutch-Colonies-L dated 19 October 2000, at http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/Dutch-Colonies/2000-10/ 0971977989, citing Clenendar of New Jersey Wills, vol. 33 (1761-1770).
82Machackemeck baptisms are from Minisink Valley Dutch Church Records, as cited above, p. 273.
83This list is partly from the LDS Ancestral File (father QBJF-XP, mother QBJG-3J), and the apparently more reliable Lorraine Luke, Ulster County, New York Ancestors & Descendents, available online at http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=gemini. Machackemeck baptisms are from Minisink Valley Dutch Church Records, as cited above, pp. 101, 103, 105, 108, 112, 118, 124, 133.
84KgB no. 2837.
85Ralph H. Weller, The Hieronimus Weller Family in America, above-cited, p. 10.
86KgB no. 4147.
87Minisink Valley Dutch Church Records, as cited above, p. 269.
88KgB no. 3142.
89See Walter Kenneth Griffin, “The Dutcher Family,” pt. 2, NYGBR 40 (1909):249-58, at p. 254, which however does not give his marriage.
90WNYHS 13:64-5.
91Minisink Valley Dutch Church Records, as cited above, p. 273.
92Minisink Valley Dutch Church Records, as cited above, pp. 130, 131.
93Minisink Valley Dutch Church Records, as cited above, p. 161.
94KgB no. 4479.
95KgB no. 4767.
96Minisink Valley Dutch Church Records, as cited above, p. 271.
97Ralph Le Fevre, History of New Paltz, New York and its old families (from 1678 to 1820) (Albany, N.Y., 1909), pp. 223-252; Kenneth Edward Hasbrouck, The Bevier family: the descendants of Louis Bevier, patentee of New Paltz, New York (New Paltz, N.Y.: Huguenot Historical Society, 1970), 307 pp.
98Minisink Valley Dutch Church Records, cited above, p. 273; Michael J. O’Brien, The McCarthys in Early American History (New York: Dodd, Mead and Company, 1921), 180-1.
99Minisink Valley Dutch Church Records, cited above, pp. 160, 169, 172, 175; Lorraine Luke, Ulster County, New York Ancestors & Descendents, available online at http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=gemini.
100Minisink Valley Dutch Church Records, cited above, pp. 215, 223, 222, 225 (second and third children not baptized in order of birth).
101Minisink Valley Dutch Church Records, as cited above, p. 275.
102Minisink Valley Dutch Church Records, as cited above, p. 138.
103KgB no. 2247.
104KgM no. 907.
105From The Celebration of the One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the Reformed Church, Montgomery, Orange Co., N.Y. (Montgomery, 1882), p. 9:
It may be interesting to you also to know the names of the sixteen members with whom the Church was organized. They are all familiar names, and with one or two exceptions are common among us to this day. The record in low Dutch reads as follows:— “On confession were received to the fellowship of this Church, 1732.— Alichael Krans, M^irgriet Maul, Cathrina Maul, Johannes Krans, Jacob Sinsebach, Magdalena Sinsebach, Benira Newkerk, Aitje Menges, wife of Stephanus Christ, Elizabeth Menges, wife of Lawrens Christ, Gertrout Jong Bloet, Fredrick Weller, Anna Margretta Kochin, Maria Gertrout Stemer, wife of Philip Melsbach, Maria Cathrina Stemer, Elizabeth Stemer, Geertje Klearwater, wife of Johannes Newkerk.”
106PFNY 2:1084.
107Records of Montgomery R.D. Church, as extracted in IGI. This list agrees with Mackenzie (6:371), where however the dates are erroneously presented as birthdates.
108CFA, pp. 261-62 (for the marriage of Benjamin Comfort to Elizabeth Youngblood); 324 (for their son Absalom).
109The father’s name being erroneously given as Christian in the record.
110The father’s named is erroneously given as Jacob Constable, but the mother’s name is given correctly.
111KgB no. 2529.
112KgM no. 908.
113On whom see PFNY 2:1080-83, at p. 1083; Ralph H. Weller, The Hieronimus Weller Family in America (Alcove, N.Y., 1999), pp. 9-10, etc.
114From The Celebration of the One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the Reformed Church, Montgomery, Orange Co., N.Y. (Montgomery, 1882), p. 9, as quoted above under the account of her sister Margaretha.
115PFNY 2:1083-4; Maclenzie, 6:371, misses the second daughter Anna Juliana.
116See Samuel E. Eager, An Outline History of Orange County (Newburgh, “1846-7”), 281-2; Ruttenber & Clark, History of Orange County… (1881), 376-9.
117We are much indebted to the account of this family in the Weller genealogy, pp. 22ff.
118Eager, Outline History of Orange County, pp. 338-40.
119Their dates — ca. 1728-1798 and 1754-1810+ respectively — would make either father or son a plausible candidate.
120Gustave Anjou (ed.), Ulster County, N.Y. Probate Records, 2 vols. (New York, 1906), 2:57.
121 Joseph Donald & Carol Ann (Gaunce) Nickell, Descendants of William Bull (=Sarah WELLS) and allied lines, available online at http://nickell.tierranet.com/bull/fam09813.htm; Marc Nozell’s Genealogy, available online at http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=nozell.
122Eager, Outline History of Orange County, 484.
123Lineage of Margaret Ellen (Mitchell) Whallon, in Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, 3:475-6; no dates are provided for this William Weller, nor the name of any wife.
124Eager’s Outline History of Orange County, 483-4, states that when Eleanor (Bull) Weller’s mother died on 21 April 1796, Eleanor had seven children and three grandchildren. We can account for only two grandchildren born before that date.
125Indeed this is specifically asserted in Joseph Donald & Carol Ann (Gaunce) Nickell, Descendants of William Bull (=Sarah WELLS) and allied lines, available online at http://nickell.tierranet.com/bull/fam09810.htm.
126Gene Pool Individual Records; a subscription database available at Ancestry.com. The records actually give the place as Crawford township, but this is an anachronism, as Crawford was not set off from Montgomery until 1823.
127“Medoc,” Halifax County, North Carolina, Genealogical Society Newsletter (Dec. 2007), p. 3. We are grateful to the author (and editor of the newsletter), Susan Mamby, for bringing this item to our attention.
128Russel Headley (ed.), The History of Orange County, New York (Middletown, N.Y., 1908), 979, 980.
129Russel Headley (ed.), The History of Orange County, New York (Middletown, N.Y., 1908), 980.
130 Descendants of William Bull (=Sarah WELLS) and allied lines, available online at http://nickell.tierranet.com/bull/fam09811.htm.
131 Descendants of William Bull (=Sarah WELLS) and allied lines, available online at http://nickell.tierranet.com/bull/fam09812.htm. As of 8 January 2006 this page did not show their children.
132Descendants of William Bull (=Sarah WELLS) and allied lines, available online at http://nickell.tierranet.com/bull/fam09813.htm, which is also our source for his marriage date and for the dates of his wife.
133Gertrude A. Barber (comp.), Cemeteries Located in Orange County, N.Y. …, typescript, date-stamped 1932, in the collection of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society.
1341800 census of Orange Co., p. 326; 1810 census of Orange Co., p. 474.
135Ancestors of Donald Carl Embler, available online at http://www.qpollc.com/emblergen/emblerweb.htm.
136Eager, Outline History of Orange County, p. 358.
137For the younger children we follow Gene Pool Individual Records; a subscription database available at Ancestry.com.
138The names are evidently quite unclear in the record. Hasbrouck’s edition gives the name as “Leatus? Marcus,” while Worden’s gives it as “Lectus Marens.”
139For one line of their descendancy see Ancestors of Donald Carl Embler, available online at http://www.qpollc.com/emblergen/emblerweb.htm.
1401800 census of Orange Co., p. 294.
141For his wife see Descendants of William Bull (=Sarah WELLS) and allied lines, available online at http://nickell.tierranet.com/bull/fam09813.htm, which is also our source for his marriage date and for the dates of his wife. However, this source incorrectly makes him a son of his uncle, Abasalom Weller.
142Ancestors of Donald Carl Embler, available online at http://www.qpollc.com/emblergen/emblerweb.htm.
143The early records of the First Presbyterian Church at Goshen, New York, from 1767 to 1885, comp. Coleman (Goshen, 1934), p. 19.
144KgB no. 2791.
145Jones, in MPF:48, shows another John McLean, also of Hanover Precinct (now Montgomery Tp.), who was alive in 1747 and was thus a contemporary of this man.
146So CFA. But Jones, in MPF:48, shows Margareta Christ, wife of the other John MacLean, joining the church in 1747. Did both women join in the same year?
147Mackenzie, 6:371.
148When her first child was born.
149CFA 456-514.
150As her first child was baptized 30 April 1751.
151CFA 260-456.
152PFNY 1:605.
153KgB no. 2791.
154See PFNY 1:613-16, at p. 616.
155Jones. Mackenzie, 6:372, carelessly gives as her birthdate that of her daughter Anna.
156PFNY 2:1084; 1:616, 483.
157Mackenzie, loc. cit.
158D.A.R. Lineage Book, 48:451, etc.
159According to the lineage of Florence McCoy Crane (Montgomery) Brinson, in Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, 7:623-4, which reproduces a portrait of Abraham Dickerson Soper. “Wm. Dickerson’s wife Dority” died 18 October 1755 at Southold (Long Island Source Records, p. 220). She is also mentioned in the 1753 will of her father, John Corey, which however calls her Dorothea Dickinson; see Lucy D. Akerly, “The Corey family of Southampton, and Southold, Long Island, N.Y.,” pt. 2, NYGBR 32 (1901): 30-35, at p. 33 (reprinted in Genealogies of Long Island Families, 1:307-12). They are buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard, Abraham’s tombstone stating that he served in the 2nd Regiment of Ulster County Militia. We have not seen Wesley Logan Baker, Dickerson and Dickinson: Descendants of Philemon Dickerson of Southold, Long Island, N.Y.; also, Long Island Descendants of Captain John Dickinson of Oyster Bay (1978), which certainly mentions Abraham Dickerson, husband of Anna Maul, on p. 568.
160James Milligan Dickson, The Goodwill memorial; or, The first one hundred and fifty years of the Goodwill Presbyterian Church, Montgomery, Orange Co., N.Y. (Newburgh, N.Y., 1880), 75-76.
161See also Ruttenber & Clark, p. 381, and Mackenzie, 6:372.
162LDS Ancestral File, entry no. 1T31-MJR. For Elisabeth Buchstäber see Jones, More Palatine Families, p. 41.
163He is treated in Charles H. Cochrane, The History of the Town of Marlborough, Ulster County, New York (Poughkeepsie, 1887), 164-5, where however his wife’s surname is erroneously given as Dickinson. This work is our main source on their issue.
164Dutchess Observer, 17 July 1822, per Notice of Marriages and Deaths about 4,000 in Number Published in Newspapers Printed at Poughkeepsie, New York, 1778-1825 (Collections of the Dutchess County Historical Society, vol. IV, 1930), p. 96.
165Charles H. Cochrane, The History of the Town of Marlborough, Ulster County, New York, 165-6, 181; Ron & Mandy Stonehouse, Stonehouse and Related Families, available online at http://www.stonehouse.ca/tree2/index.htm.
166United Methodist Church of Milton & Marlboro, available online at http://www.gbgm-umc.org/mmumc/history.html.
167Charles H. Cochrane, The History of the Town of Marlborough, Ulster County, New York, 182.
168Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County, p. 1424; Ron & Mandy Stonehouse, Stonehouse and Related Families, available online at http://www.stonehouse.ca/tree2/surnames.htm, where however Adam Dickerson is erroneously said to have been born 1765.
169Ruttenber & Clark, History of Orange County, p. 409; Kenneth E. Hasbrouk, The Hasbrouck Family in America (New Paltz, N.Y., 1961), pp. 205-6.
170See Eager, Outline History of Orange County, 282-95; Ruttenber & Clark, History of Orange County, pp. 376-9. There is also a good summary of this material in Martha & Bill Reamy, Pioneer Families of Orange County, New York (1993), 112.
171See Eager, Outline History of Orange County, 281-2; Ruttenber & Clark, History of Orange County, insert following p. 654.
172Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County, 909-10.
173Weller genealogy, p. 261, q.v. for descendants.
174Her name also appears as Huy, Heuwey, Huwigh, and a number of less recognizable variants. We know nothing of her family.
175As suggested to us by Pamela J. Sears in 2006.
176Abstracts of Wills on file in the Surrogateļæ½s Office, City of New York, 4:3.
177Records of Shawangunk R.D. churches per IGI; name of fifth child, and children’s marriages, from Mackenzie, 6:371.
178As suggested to us by Pamela J. Sears in 2006.
179Marbletown baptisms, nos. 1083 and 1249; this evidence was brought to our attention by Pamela J. Sears.
180The mother’s name being erroneously given as Susanna “Theis.”
181See Anonymous, Descendants of Jan [Van Keuren], available online at http://www.afn.org/~afn10447/VAN%20KEUREN.html.
182Chester Van Keuren, The Van Keuren Family (Kingston, N.Y.: privately published, 1990), p. 97, quoted by Cathe Gordon, supra cit.
183Information not from baptismal records is from Pamela J. Sears.
184The following information is from descendant Pamela J. Sears: Hiram Miller married (1) 27 December 1827 in he Dutch Reformed church of Bloomingburgh, Sullivan Co., Maria Brink, baptized 2 December 1802 at Shawangunk, daughter of Cornelius Brink and Leah Van Keuren. She died 24 November 1828, probably in child birth, for her son Cornelius Brink Miller was born ca. November 1828, as confirmed by census records. This Cornelius B. Miller is probably one of the children listed by Jared Miller in the Miller family bible, who is not further identified. He married a woman named Agnes, and moved to San Francisco, and then Oakland, Alameda, California (1860, 1870 and 1880 census returns).
1851850 Census of New York, Kings County, Brooklyn 2nd Ward, p. 215, taken 27 July 1850:
294/358
name               age  gender    occupation  place of birth
------------------------------------------------------------
Hiram Miller         51   male     none       NY
Susan E. Miller      44   female              NY
Cornelius B. Miller  21   male     acct       NY
Gared [?] Miller     11   male     in school  NY
Penina Van Heman     46   female              NY
Mary Johnson         26   female              Ireland
186Miller family bible record, and Christian Intelligencer of the Reformed Dutch Church, 3 January 1861.
187J. Wilson Poucher & Byron J. Terwilliger, Old Gravestones of Ulster County, New York (Collections of the Ulster County Historical Society, vol. 1, 1931), 324.
188MacKenzie, 6:371-2; D.A.R. Lineage Book, 48:450, etc.
189 He was perhaps the Christopher Mould of Shawangunk whose will is recorded in Ulster Co. will book D (1804-1814), p. 437, but we have not checked the record.
190For the statement that she was a sister of Abraham Dickerson see Dickson, The Goodwill Memorial (1880), cited above, 75; for her parentage see the note on her brother above. She is certainly treated in Wesley Logan Baker, Dickerson and Dickinson: Descendants of Philemon Dickerson of Southold, Long Island, N.Y.; also, Long Island Descendants of Captain John Dickinson of Oyster Bay (1978), pp. 57, 556; but we have not had access to a copy of that work.
191In an earlier version of these notes we carelessly credited them with a daughter Susannah, born 26 January 1809 according to the records of the Montgomery Dutch Church; but as pointed out to us by Susanne (Embler) Devine, if the dates are correct this was seven days after Catharine’s death.
192See J.M. Pelton, Genealogy of the Pelton Family in America (Albany, N.Y., 1892), pp. 422-5, for a refcord of their family.
193William S. Pelletreau, Historic Homes and Institutions and Genealogical and Family History of New York, 4 vols. (1907), 4:32-3; CFA 168-9.
194D.A.R. Lineage Book, 94:228.
195Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County, p. 1049, where however her name is misprinted “Runna.” It is conceivable that there were two daughters named Ruanna, the first dying young, but the coincidence of the calendar dates of the supposed events, and the tightness of the chronology implied thereby, lead us to doubt such a possibility.
196Some of our information on this man is taken from D.A.R. Lineage Book, 48:450, 81:120, and other citations.
197D.A.R. Lineage Book, 69:165.
198Will of Johannes Mould, from a transcription kindly supplied by Jody Masterson.
199See D.A.R. Lineage Book, 69:165.
200The record giving the name of the father as “John Moore.”
201The children of Samuel McKinstry and Catharine (Felter) Mould, all baptized in the Montgomery Dutch Church, were: (i) Christopher Mould McKinstry, born 9 June 1819; (ii) Sarah McKinstry, born 23 July 1821; (iii) Jacob D. Felter McKinstry, born 14 May 1824; (iv) Esther Felter McKinstry, born 12 March 1827; (v) Caroline McKinstry, born 15 January 1832.
202Will of Christopher Mould, from a transcription kindly supplied by Jody Masterson.
203Ruttenber & Clark, p. __.
204This couple baptized three children at Montgomery, and the records record their names in a rather inconsistent manner: in 1782 as Mathias Rou and Margarett Kreysley; in 1787 as Mathys Row and Margrieta Rysley; in 1790 as Matthew Rouw and Margaret Ryslie.
205Additional information from Susanne (Embler) Devine.
206Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County, p. 716.
207The last two children, being baptized on the same (but unstated) day some time after their father’s death, are recorded as the children of “Cathrine Mould, widow of Daniel Embler.”
208Weller genealogy, pp. 100-1.
209Mackenzie, 6:369-70; and more importantly, the Weller genealogy, pp. 100-1, 210-12, etc.
210The Celebration of the One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the Reformed Church, Montgomery, Orange Co., N.Y. (Montgomery, 1882), p. 41.
211The Celebration of the One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the Reformed Church, Montgomery, p. 43.
2121900 U.S. Federal Census, New York, Orange County, Montgomery Tp., enumeration district 28, p. 13B; roll T623_1140. The entry reads:
name      relationship  gender  age birthdate  b.p. fa.b.p. mo.b.p. occupation
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Martha Mould      head       F  75  April 1825  NY    NY    NY    farmer
Martha Mould      dau.       F  30  March 1870  NY    NY    NY    school-teacher
Lenna* M. Draper  dau.       F  39  July  1860  NY    NY    NY
William F. Draper son-in-law M  48  February  1852  Mass. Mass. Mass. farm laborer
William B. Draper grandson   M  16  November  1883  NY    Mass. NY    at school
Ray West          servant    M  13  April 1887  NY    NY    NY    at school
===
* sic
213Ruttenber & Clark, History of Orange County, pp. 411, 415 (for the identification of Martha Bull’s mother); The Weller genealogy, pp. 158 (for Milton Bull’s Weller descent), 210, which says that an obituary of Christopher J. Mould mentions four children, while acknowledging that only three are accounted for.
214See Thomas Waln-Morgan Draper, The Drapers in America (New York, 1892), p. 143.
215Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County, pp. 232, 715. Bergoon Van Alst (1795-1842) and his wife Jane Lowe (1802-1955) are buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard.
216The Celebration of the One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the Reformed Church, Montgomery, Orange Co., N.Y. (Montgomery, 1882), p. 50.
217Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County, pp. 256, where however the year of their marriage is erroneously given as 1845.
218Gertrude A. Barber (comp.), Graveyard Inscriptions of Orange County New York, typescript, 4 vols. (1930), 4:50.
219Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County (1895), 733-4; Russel Headley (ed.), The History of Orange County, New York (Middletown, N.Y., 1908), 973; Reynolds, Cuyler (ed.) Genealogical and Family History of Southern New York and the Hudson River Valley …, 3 vols. (New York, 1914), 1:256-8; Mackenzie, 6:369-70.
220Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County, pp. 240-1.
221Information from Christine Emerson-Moulton. The name is incorrectly given as Rowland in Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County, and as Pawlins (sic) in Headley’s History of Orange County.
222The Wallkill Valley in Art and Story (Walden, New York: Wallkill Valley Farmers’ Association, [1899]), 42 (with portait).
223United States Patent no. 1662727, available online at http://www.freepatentsonline.com/1662727.pdf.
224Mackenzie, Colonial Families of the United States, 6 (1917):369-73.
225Finding Aids to Personal Papers and Special Collections in the Smithsonian Institution Archives — Record Unit 7094, Wesley Wait Papers, 1921-1925, available online at http://siarchives.si.edu/findingaids/FARU7094.htm.
226Compare Kimball G. Everingham’ss Genealogical Database at http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=kgeveringham.
227Ignore the impossible date of birth assigned to her in the Weller genealogy.
228Some of this material is taken from the Weller genealogy.
2291900 U.S. Federal Census, New York, Orange County, Montgomery Tp., enumeration district 28, p. 13B; roll T623_1140. The entry reads:
name    relationship  gender  age birthdate  b.p. fa.b.p. mo.b.p. occupation
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
William S. Mould  head     F  63  Jan. 1837   NY     NY     NY     farmer
Hannah B. Mould   wife     F  57  May  1843   NY     NY     NY
William J. Mould  son      F  28  September 1871  NY     NY     NY     farm labor
Mary Brand        servant  F  48  May  1852   Maine  Maine  Maine  housework
Archie Bruyen     servant  F  15  May  1885   NY     NY     NY     at school
George Osborn     servant  F  45  May  1855   NY     NY     NY     farm labor
===
* sic
230Weller genealogy, p. 287.
231CFA, pp. 397-8.
232Poucher & Terwilliger, Old Gravestones of Ulster County, 324.
233Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County, New York, pp. 242-3.
234The early records of the First Presbyterian Church at Goshen, New York, from 1767 to 1885, comp. Coleman (Goshen, 1934), p. 37.
235See D.A.R. Lineage Book, 81:120-1.
236Hamilton Morrison (1759-1808) and his wife Lydia Beemer (1764?-1868), who is said to have been aged 103 years at her death, are buried in the Montgomery Dutch churchyard.
237See D.A.R. Lineage Book 48:450-1, 452; 65:87-88; Nutt, Newburgh: Her Institutions, Industries, and Leading Citizens (1891), 211; Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County (1895), pp. 1523-5, 674; Russel Headley, The History of Orange County, New York (Middletown, New York, 1908), pp. 906-7 (does not name a daughter Elizabeth).
238We are grateful to Pat Eckardt, of Murphy, North Carolina, for bringing this work to our attention,
239D.A.R. Lineage Book 48:450.
240Weller genealogy, p. 264.
241See D.A.R. Lineage Book, 51:192; 94:228.
242“C.R. Marks,” in Northwestern Iowa: Its History and Tradition, vol. 3, available online at http://iagenweb.org/history/ni/nibv3m.htm, a reference kindly pointed out to us by Sue Devine.
243Gertrude A. Barber (comp.), Graveyard Inscriptions of Orange County New York, typescript, 4 vols. (1930), 4:59.
244A brief biographical sketch of him appears in The Wallkill Valley in Art and Story (Walden, New York: Wallkill Valley Farmers’ Association, [1899]), 59 (with portrait).
245Their date of marriage of 1838 as given in the church records would appear to be incorrect, as notes by Marshall Pierson in the possession of a descendant, Jody (Pierson) Masterson, distinctly state that the couple celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in 1889.
246Some of this information is from notes by Marshall Pierson in the possession of a descendant, Jody (Pierson) Masterson. According to the notice of her son Jonathan in Morton Montgomery, Historical and Biographical Annals of Berks County Pennsylvania (Chicago, 1909), p. 704, she “was a lineal descendant of William Douglas, who emigrated from Scotland in 1640 and settled at Boston, Massachusetts.” The Wanderer, or Horatio and Laetitia: A Poem (Utica, 1811) is mentioned in John Camp Williams, An Oneida County Printer, William Williams: Printer, Publisher, Editor (New York, 1906), p. 47, which states: ”The authors were Douglas Brothers of Pratt’s Settlement, N.Y., and were personally known to Mr. A.G. Dauby, the Editor of the Utica Observer.” Isaac Douglass’s own copy, with extensive revisions for an intended new edition and the title altered to The Western Wanderer, or Horatio and Laetitia: A Metrical Tale contains a note in a different hand stating that the work was “written by Isaac Douglas (father of Emily Douglas Mould) and his friend.”
247Except for the inexplicable omission of their son Harrison, which is probably a typographical error. Additional details has been supplied from see the biographical sketch of their son Frank in Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County, New York, pp. 702-3, and information supplied by Susanne (Embler) Devine.
248For the maternal ancestry of Elsie Milspaugh, whose mother was a Weller (but, unlike some of the Wellers mentioned elsewhere in this page, had no known Maul descent) see the 1999 Weller genealogy, pp. 99-100.
249From notes by a grandson, Marshall Pierson, kindly supplied by Jody (Pierson) Masterson.
2501880 U.S. Federal Census, Michigan, Oakland Co., Commerce, p. 74D; National Archives microfilm no. T9-0598 [Family History Library microfilm no. 1,254,598]. The entry reads:
name    relation  cond.  gender  race age  b.p. fa.p.d.   mo.b.p.  occcupation
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Allen Bryson     head  M  Male    W   52   NY   IRELAND   IRELAND  varpenter
Emma L. Bryson   wife  M  Female  W   34   NY   NY        NY       keeping house
Alice Bryson     dau.  S  Female  W    9   NY   NY        NY
Caroline Bryson  dau.  S  Female  W    8   NY   NY        NY
251Walden and its Environs with Pen and Camera (Walden, New York: Wallkill Valley Publishing Association, 1914), p. 86, quoted in Pioneer Families of Orange County, New York, p. 17.
252Morton Montgomery, Historical and Biographical Annals of Berks County Pennsylvania (Chicago, 1909), p. 704.
253Morton Montgomery, Historical and Biographical Annals of Berks County Pennsylvania (Chicago, 1909), p. 704.
254Morton Montgomery, Historical and Biographical Annals of Berks County Pennsylvania (Chicago, 1909), p. 704.
255Portrait and Biographical Record of Orange County, New York, pp. 620-22.
256The Wallkill Valley in Art and Story (Walden, New York: Wallkill Valley Farmers’ Association, [1899]), 56 (with portrait).
257The 1895 biographical sketch erroneously gives the year of his birth as 1852. CFA correctly states that he and his brother Washington were twins and were born 9 March 1851.
258CFA calls him Louis D. Holmes, but his marriage record and the 1895 biographical sketch of her brother Franklin calls him L.H. Holmes.


Some Sites of Related Interest

From the Genealogy Page of John Blythe Dobson
URL = johnblythedobson.org/genealogy/ff/Maul.cfm
This page first appeared 2 February 2002
Placed in an archival state 28 February 2013
Last revised 30 September 2016